If we could not find room for it, time to digest it, or a reason to run it during the past week, we have collected it here.  Not a recap for the week, but a cleanup of pieces we received and just could not get to.

Because Quantum is Coming.  Qubit

Business & Industry

BMW explores quantum computing to boost supply chain efficiencies | BMW has become the latest company to take interest in the behavior of particles of matter taken at their smallest, quantum scale – or rather, in how those particles could generate the leaps in productivity that are expected to come with the advent of quantum-based technologies.   Source: ZD Net. Daphne Leprince-Ringuet  BMW explores quantum computing to boost supply chain efficiencies…

THE CONVERGENCE OF INTERNET OF THINGS AND QUANTUM COMPUTING | The Internet of Things (IoT) is actively shaping both the industrial and consumer worlds, and by 2023, consumers, companies, and governments will install 40 billion IoT devices globally.  Source: BBN Time. Ahmed Banafa  THE CONVERGENCE OF INTERNET OF THINGS AND QUANTUM COMPUTING…

Technology & Hardware

Full stack ahead: Pioneering quantum hardware allows for controlling up to thousands of qubits at cryogenic temperatures | Quantum computing offers the promise of solutions to previously unsolvable problems, but in order to deliver on this promise, it will be necessary to preserve and manipulate information that is contained in the most delicate of resources: highly entangled quantum states. One thing that makes this so challenging is that quantum devices must be ensconced in an extreme environment in order to preserve quantum information, but signals must be sent to each qubit in order to manipulate this information—requiring, in essence, an information superhighway into this extreme environment. Both of these problems must, moreover, be solved at a scale far beyond that of present-day quantum device technology.  Source: Microsoft Research Blog. Chetan Nayak  Full stack ahead: Pioneering quantum hardware allows for controlling up to thousands of qubits at cryogenic temperatures…

Cooling quantum computers | Keeping your qubits stable requires some of the most extreme cooling equipment around  Source: DCD. Sebastian Moss  Cooling quantum computers…

Science & Research

Efficient modeling of superconducting quantum circuits with tensor networks | We use a tensor network method to compute the low-energy excitations of a large-scale fluxonium qubit up to a desired accuracy. We employ this numerical technique to estimate the pure-dephasing coherence time of the fluxonium qubit due to charge noise and coherent quantum phase slips from first principles, finding an agreement with previously obtained experimental results. By developing an accurate single-mode theory that captures the details of the fluxonium device, we benchmark the results obtained with the tensor network for circuits spanning a Hilbert space as large as 15180. Our algorithm is directly applicable to the wide variety of circuit-QED systems and may be a useful tool for scaling up superconducting quantum technologies.  Source: npj | quantum information. Agustin Di Paolo, Thomas E. Baker, Alexandre Foley, David Sénéchal & Alexandre Blais  Efficient modeling of superconducting quantum circuits with tensor networks…

Algorithms & Software

New “Fast Forward” Algorithm Could Unleash the Power of Quantum Computers | A new algorithm that fast forwards simulations could bring greater use ability to current and near-term quantum computers, opening the way for applications to run past strict time limits that hamper many quantum calculations.  Source: Los Alamos National Laboratory (SciTechDaily). Los Alamos National Laboratory  New “Fast Forward” Algorithm Could Unleash the Power of Quantum Computers…

Effective routing design for remote entanglement generation on quantum networks | Quantum network is a promising platform for many ground-breaking applications that lie beyond the capability of its classical counterparts. Efficient entanglement generation on quantum networks with relatively limited resources such as quantum memories is essential to fully realize the network’s capabilities, the solution to which calls for delicate network design and is currently at the primitive stage. In this study we propose an effective routing scheme to enable automatic responses for multiple requests of entanglement generation between source-terminal stations on a quantum lattice network with finite edge capacities. Multiple connection paths are exploited for each connection request while entanglement fidelity is ensured for each path by performing entanglement purification. The routing scheme is highly modularized with a flexible nature, embedding quantum operations within the algorithmic workflow, whose performance is evaluated from multiple perspectives. In particular, three algorithms are proposed and compared for the scheduling of capacity allocation on the edges of quantum network. Embodying the ideas of proportional share and progressive filling that have been well-studied in classical routing problems, we design another scheduling algorithm, the propagatory update method, which in certain aspects overrides the two algorithms based on classical heuristics in scheduling performances. The general solution scheme paves the road for effective design of efficient routing and flow control protocols on applicational quantum networks.  Source: npj | quantum information. Changhao Li, Tianyi Li, Yi-Xiang Liu & Paola Cappellaro  Effective routing design for remote entanglement generation on quantum networks… 

Government & Policy

How to enable quantum computing innovation through access | Two recent breakthroughs in quantum computing have generated significant excitement in the field. By using quantum computers to solve problems that classical computers could not, researchers in the United States and China have separately ushered in the era of “quantum advantage.” Yet as momentous as the demonstration of quantum advantage may be, it is the availability of more capable quantum machines that will ultimately have greater impact. Access to these machines will foster a cohort of “quantum natives” capable of solving real-world problems with quantum computers.  Source: Brookings Institute. Joan A. Hoffmann  How to enable quantum computing innovation through access…