Report: Quantum Information Technologies to Revolutionize Government Security

Practical planning for a quantum future

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+  “QIS is currently at the threshold of a potentially disruptive revolution, creating opportunities and challenges for the Nation, as growing international interest and investments are starting a global quantum race,” the agency’s budget request states. “DOE envisions a future in which the cross-cutting field of QIS increasingly drives scientific frontiers and innovations toward realizing the full potential of quantum-based applications, from computing to sensing, connected through a quantum internet.”

“In principle, if you were to try to interrupt the communication, it’s visible because the entanglement of the two particles makes it so that any change you make on one impacts the other and vice versa,” Buchholz said.

+  Quantum information technologies stand to revolutionize government security. Exactly when that will happen is yet unknown, but a new report stresses that it’s not too soon for agencies to begin preparing.

+  Deloitte Insights’ “The realist’s guide to quantum technology and national security” offers a way for nontechnical government leaders to start learning about quantum information science. The Energy Department defines (QIS) as “the ability to exploit intricate quantum mechanical phenomena to create fundamentally new ways of obtaining and processing information.” It’s based on quantum mechanics, a branch of physics that describes the behavior of matter at the subatomic scale.

+  Specifically, quantum technologies allow for the manipulation of individual atoms to exploit their properties to accomplish things that were previously impossible, said Scott Buchholz, Deloitte Consulting’s CTO for government and public services and national emerging tech research director, who is one of the report authors.

Source:  GCN.  Stephanie Kanowitz,  Practical planning for a quantum future…

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