Einstein Hmmm

The rate at which quantum computing is hitting the media stream is ever-increasing. This piece is a collection of recent articles and reports covering various aspects of quantum computing from the lens of science and research. Mea Cubitt

Ytterbium ion trap quantum computing: The current state-of-the-art | The history of classical computers is a progression from the first proofs of concept, using vacuum tubes, to the eventual sophistication of modern silicon-based architecture. Now, quantum computers are moving from proof of concept to practical design and are at the point of scaling to increasingly large numbers of coherent, well-connected qubits.  Source: AVS Quantum SCIENCE.   Ytterbium ion trap quantum computing: The current state-of-the-art…

WPI-MANA Probing Potential of Quantum Materials | The NIMS Quantum Materials Project is WPI-MANA’s newly formed group for research into creating and exploiting quantum materials. Recently the Japanese government selected a number of priority research projects and has directed funds toward them. One of the fields of interest is quantum technology — quantum computing, quantum information and so on — related to the very small physical world, the quantum domain. WPI-MANA spoke to two scientists of the NIMS project:  Source: CISION .   WPI-MANA Probing Potential of Quantum Materials…

NTT Research PHI Lab Adds to its Scientific Staff | NTT Research, Inc., a division of NTT (TYO:9432), announced that in the first eight months of 2021, its Physics & Informatics (PHI) Lab has gained six new scientists. These include Senior Research Scientists Adil Gangat and Sho Sugiura; Research Scientists Thibault Chervy, Edwin Ng, and Gautam Reddy; and Post-doctoral Fellow Yonghwi Kim. These additions bring the total number of PHI Lab scientists to 18, including PHI Lab Director Yoshihisa Yamamoto, generating further momentum to this group as NTT Research begins its third year of operations.  Source: businesswire.   NTT Research PHI Lab Adds to its Scientific Staff…

New quantum microscope enhances sensitivity avoiding photodamage | Invented more than 350 years ago and considered a ground breaking discovery, this instrument is now omnipresent in many fields of science. Chemists, biologists, clinicians, physicists, and even engineers rely on the capabilities of different types of microscopes to unveil the inner structures of organisms and matter that we cannot see with our naked eye. Most microscopes use light as the tool to illuminate transparent or semi-transparent samples, and allow us to see what is happening inside. Some samples tolerate high intensity levels of light, but others, like some molecules and cells, are extremely delicate and become damaged or even die under such intense radiation. This is not good for experimental accuracy.  Source: EurekAlert!   New quantum microscope enhances sensitivity avoiding photodamage…

Getting quantum dots to stop blinking | Quantum dots, discovered in the 1990s, have a wide range of applications and are perhaps best known for producing vivid colors in some high-end televisions. But for some potential uses, such as tracking biochemical pathways of a drug as it interacts with living cells, progress has been hampered by one seemingly uncontrollable characteristic: a tendency to blink off at random intervals. That doesn’t matter when the dots are used in the aggregate, as in TV screens, but for precision applications it can be a significant drawback.  Source: PHYS.ORG.   Getting quantum dots to stop blinking…

Energizer atoms: JILA researchers find new way to keep atoms excited | JILA researchers have tricked nature by tuning a dense quantum gas of atoms to make a congested “Fermi sea,” thus keeping atoms in a high-energy state, or excited, for about 10% longer than usual by delaying their normal return to the lowest-energy state. The technique might be used to improve quantum communication networks and atomic clocks.  Source: EurekAlert!   Energizer atoms: JILA researchers find new way to keep atoms excited..