Einstein Hmmm

The rate at which quantum computing is hitting the media stream is ever-increasing. This piece is a collection of recent articles and reports covering various aspects of quantum computing from the lens of science and research. Mea Cubitt

Heating Up Quantum Science Education With Laser Cooling | A series of interactive workshops developed by Columbia physicist Sebastian Will and STEMteachersNYC will give educators tips and tools to cover quantum science in their classrooms.  Source: Columbia News.   Heating Up Quantum Science Education With Laser Cooling…

TU Delft researchers realize quantum teleportation onto mechanical motion of silicon beams | Quantum technology typically employs qubits (quantum bits) consisting of, for example, single electrons, photons, or atoms. A group of TU Delft researchers has now demonstrated the ability to teleport an arbitrary qubit state from a single photon onto an optomechanical device – consisting of a mechanical structure comprising billions of atoms. Their breakthrough research, now published in Nature Photonics, enables real-world applications such as quantum internet repeater nodes while also allowing quantum mechanics itself to be studied in new ways.  Source: TU Delft (PDF).   TU Delft researchers realize quantum teleportation onto mechanical motion of silicon beams…

Research Team Unlocks Secret Path To A Quantum Future | In 1998, researchers including Mark Kubinec of UC Berkeley performed one of the first simple quantum computations using individual molecules. They used pulses of radio waves to flip the spins of two nuclei in a molecule, with each spin’s “up” or “down” orientation storing information in the way that a “0” or “1” state stores information in a classical data bit. In those early days of quantum computers, the combined orientation of the two nuclei – that is, the molecule’s quantum state – could only be preserved for brief periods in specially tuned environments. In other words, the system quickly lost its coherence. Control over quantum coherence is the missing step to building scalable quantum computers.  Source: Public..   Research Team Unlocks Secret Path To A Quantum Future…

Electrons tango to the limit in quantum material | A team led by scientists at the US Department of Energy (DOEs)’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has found a rare quantum material in which electrons move in coordinated ways, essentially ‘dancing’. Straining this material creates an electronic band structure that sets the stage for exotic, more tightly correlated behavior – akin to tangoing – among Dirac electrons, especially mobile electric charge carriers that may someday lead to faster transistors. The team reports its results in a paper in Science Advances.  Source: materialstoday.   Electrons tango to the limit in quantum material…

A highly simplified way to predict quantum light-matter interactions | When light interacts with matter, for example, when a laser beam hits a two-dimensional material like graphene, it can substantially change the behavior of the material. Depending on the form of interaction between light and matter, some chemical reactions appear differently, substances turn magnetic or ferroelectric or begin to conduct electricity without any losses. In particularly thrilling cases, an actual light source may not even be necessary because the mere possibility for light to exist, i.e., its quantum equivalent, the photons, can change the behavior of matter. Theoretical scientists try to describe and predict these fascinating phenomena because they could be crucial in the development of new quantum technologies.  Source: PHYS ORG.   A highly simplified way to predict quantum light-matter interactions…

Exotic magnetic states in miniature dimensions | Led by scientists at Empa and the International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, an international team of researchers from Switzerland, Portugal, Germany, and Spain have succeeded in building carbon-based quantum spin chains, where they captured the emergence of one of the cornerstone models of quantum magnetism first proposed by the 2016 Nobel laureate F. D. M. Haldane in 1983.  Source: nanowerk.   Exotic magnetic states in miniature dimensions…

Atoms and molecules make vortex beams | A wave-like property previously only seen in beams of light and electrons has been observed for the first time in atoms and molecules. By passing beams of helium and neon through a grid of specially shaped nanoslits, researchers led by Edvardas Narevicius of Israel’s Weizmann Institute of Science succeeded in giving the beams a non-zero orbital angular momentum (OAM). The resulting structures are known vortex beams, and they could be used for fundamental physics studies such as probing the internal structure of protons.  Source: physicsworld.   Atoms and molecules make vortex beams…

Research Team Unlocks Secret Path to a Bright Quantum Future | In 1998, researchers including Mark Kubinec of UC Berkeley performed one of the first simple quantum computations using individual molecules. They used pulses of radio waves to flip the spins of two nuclei in a molecule, with each spin’s “up” or “down” orientation storing information in the way that a “0” or “1” state stores information in a classical data bit. In those early days of quantum computers, the combined orientation of the two nuclei – that is, the molecule’s quantum state – could only be preserved for brief periods in specially tuned environments. In other words, the system quickly lost its coherence. Control over quantum coherence is the missing step to building scalable quantum computers.  Source: SciTechDaily.   Research Team Unlocks Secret Path to a Bright Quantum Future…