Einstein Hmmm

The rate at which quantum computing is hitting the media stream is ever-increasing. This piece is a collection of recent articles and reports covering various aspects of quantum computing from the lens of science and research. Mea Cubitt

Time Crystals: “Back to Basics” Approach Helps Unravel New Phase of Matter | Researchers from the University of Cambridge used computer modeling to study potential new phases of matter known as prethermal discrete time crystals (DTCs). It was thought that the properties of prethermal DTCs were reliant on quantum physics: the strange laws ruling particles at the subatomic scale. However, the researchers found that a simpler approach, based on classical physics, can be used to understand these mysterious phenomena.  Source: SciTechDaily.   Time Crystals: “Back to Basics” Approach Helps Unravel New Phase of Matter…

Subtle spin: A novel study of quantum material proves theoretical predictions | (Nanowerk News) Researchers have discovered a hard-to-observe type of spin in a quantum mechanical system. In physics, a quantum mechanical system is a set of components that interact at the quantum scale. This is the realm of atoms and subatomic particles such as those defined in the Standard Model of Particle Physics.  Source: nano werk.   Subtle spin: A novel study of quantum material proves theoretical predictions…

Photon–photon collisions could shed light on physics beyond the Standard Model | A new way of studying matter that is created when photons collide has been developed by CERN’s Com  Source: physicsworld.   Photon–photon collisions could shed light on physics beyond the Standard Model…

Fujitsu and Osaka University Deepen Collaborative Research and Development for Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computers | Osaka University and Fujitsu Limited today announced the establishment of the Fujitsu Quantum Computing Joint Research Division as a collaborative research division at the Center for Quantum Information and Quantum Biology (hereinafter QIQB) of Osaka University.  Source: FUJITSU.   Fujitsu and Osaka University Deepen Collaborative Research and Development for Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computers…

Experiments Show Quantum Computers Can Be Better Than the Sum of Their Parts | Quantum computer experiments at UMD show that combining quantum computer pieces doesn’t have to mean combining their error rates.  Source: SciTechDaily.   Experiments Show Quantum Computers Can Be Better Than the Sum of Their Parts…

Distillation method strengthens quantum entanglement in a single pair of photons | Quantum entanglement is a valuable resource, enabling spy-proof communications and allowing quantum algorithms to be faster than classical ones. But like other quantum phenomena, entanglement is also extremely delicate and sensitive to environmental noise. Because many quantum communication protocols require high levels of entanglement to operate properly, preserving that entanglement is crucial.  Source: physicsworld.   Distillation method strengthens quantum entanglement in a single pair of photons…

Connecting the Dots Between Material Properties and Qubit Performance | Scientists performed transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) at Brookhaven Lab’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials and National Synchrotron Light Source II to characterize the properties of niobium thin films made into superconducting qubit devices at Princeton University. A transmission electron microscope image of one of these films is shown in the background; overlaid on this image are XPS spectra (colored lines representing the relative concentrations of niobium metal and various niobium oxides as a function of film depth) and an illustration of a qubit device. Through these and other microscopy and spectroscopy studies, the team identified atomic-scale structural and surface chemistry defects that may be causing loss of quantum information—a hurdle to enabling practical quantum computers.  Source: Brookhaven National Laboratory.   Connecting the Dots Between Material Properties and Qubit Performance…

CAN WE SEE QUANTUM CORRELATIONS AT THE MACROSCOPIC SCALE? | One of the most fundamental features of quantum physics is Bell nonlocality: the fact that the predictions of quantum mechanics cannot be explained by any local (classical) theory. This has remarkable conceptual consequences and far-reaching applications in quantum information. However, in our everyday experience, macroscopic objects seem to behave according to the rules of classical physics, and the correlations we see are local. Is this really the case, or can we challenge this view? In a recent paper in Physical Review Letters, scientists from the University of Vienna and the Institute of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences have shown that it is possible to fully preserve the mathematical structure of quantum theory in the macroscopic limit. This could lead to observations of quantum nonlocality at the macroscopic scale.  Source: OAW.   CAN WE SEE QUANTUM CORRELATIONS AT THE MACROSCOPIC SCALE?