A Step Toward Large-scale Quantum Computers: Characterization of Non-Gaussian Noise in Superconducting Qubits

Research advances noise cancelling for quantum computers

Excerpts and salient points ~

+  “This is the first concrete step toward trying to characterize more complicated types of noise processes than commonly assumed in the quantum domain,” said Lorenza Viola, a professor of physics at Dartmouth who led the 2016 study as well as the theory component of the present work. “As qubit coherence properties are being constantly improved, it is important to detect non-Gaussian noise in order to build the most precise quantum systems possible.”

A team from Dartmouth College and MIT has designed and conducted the first lab test to successfully detect and characterize a class of complex, “non-Gaussian” noise processes that are routinely encountered in superconducting quantum computing systems.

+  Superconducting qubit systems are considered one of the leading contenders in the race to build scalable, high-performing quantum computers. But, like other qubit platforms, they are highly sensitive to their environment and can be affected by both external noise and internal noise.

+  External noise in quantum computing systems could come from control electronics or stray magnetic fields. Internal noise could come from other uncontrolled quantum systems such as material impurities. The ability to reduce noise is a major focus in the development of quantum computers.

+  “The big barrier preventing us from having large-scale quantum computers now is this noise issue.” said Leigh Norris, a postdoctoral associate at Dartmouth that co-authored the study. “This research moves us toward understanding the noise, which is a step toward cancelling it, and hopefully having a reliable quantum computer one day.”

Source:  ScienceDaily.  Dartmouth News,  Research advances noise cancelling for quantum computers…

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