Australia, in collaboration with U.S.A.’s Purdue University, surged forward with controlling qubits individually on silicon chips. The ability to control qubits singly is seen paramount to moving ahead in making quantum computing a reality. Additional positive findings were error-reductions in the system due to the ability to control qubits individually when in proximity to each other. This brings quantum computing one step closer to complex computations involving entangled states. 

Australian and U.S. researchers have accomplished control of two individual qubits within 16 nanometers of one another.

This report is found at the University of New South Wales…