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The rate at which quantum computing is hitting the media stream is ever-increasing. This piece is a collection of articles and reports covering various aspects of quantum computing from the lens of cybersecurity and cryptography. Mea Cubitt

Without quantum security, our blockchain future is uncertain | News that two teams of Chinese scientists have achieved quantum advantage — a technical term for when a computer can perform functions beyond that of a classical computer — may be the signal that we have truly entered a new era. While Google’s 54-qubit quantum processor, Sycamore, became the first widely known example of early-stage quantum computing, the latest news out of the University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei is the best proof yet that we have crossed the information rubicon.  Source: COINTELEGRAPH.   Without quantum security, our blockchain future is uncertain…

Report: China to Target Encrypted Data as Quantum Advances | Chinese threat actors may increasingly look to steal sensitive, encrypted data in hopes of decrypting it with quantum computing technology in the years ahead, according to a new report. Researchers say Chinese threat actors may target government, private sector and academic data with long-term value, including trade secrets, biometric identification markers, Social Security numbers, criminal records, weapon designs, and research and development around pharmaceuticals, biology, materials science, and chemistry, among other areas.  Source: HEALTHCARE INFO SECURITY.   Report: China to Target Encrypted Data as Quantum Advances…

Public Key Encryption Dead Before 50? | November 2021 marks the 45th anniversary of when Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman published their paper, New Directions in Cryptography, introducing the world to a new system for developing and exchanging keys over an insecure channel. The Diffie-Hellman key exchange has since become one of the most important developments in public-key cryptography and is frequently used in a range of different security protocols including, TLS, IPsec, SSH, PGP, and many others.   Source: QUANTUMXCHANGE.   Public Key Encryption Dead Before 50?

Message Received: Studying Quantum Channels | Physicists study many forms of communication, including quantum communication. Thanks to specific properties of quantum mechanics, like entanglement, information integrity can be better maintained with quantum communications, even being hackproof in some cases. Quantum entanglement is the property that allows two molecules, each in a random quantum state, to be in perfect harmony with each other. This is important, as one common test of quantum communication devices, a.k.a., quantum channels, is to send entangled photons (light particles) down these channels. Entanglement helps when photons are lost or absorbed, as the redundancy in information being sent this way ensures that some of the information will still reach the receiver.  Source: JILA.   Message Received: Studying Quantum Channels…

In a quantum future, our economy needs to be protected. A cyber security expert explains why | The privacy of online communication is currently protected by cryptography, which shields information as it travels around the internet. It secures everything from making online purchases to accessing work email remotely. With capabilities of quantum computing growing rapidly, industry experts reckon that it will take at least another 10 years before quantum computers with very large numbers of qubits are available.  Source: World Economic Forum.   In a quantum future, our economy needs to be protected. A cyber security expert explains why …