Quantum Computing News and Reports off the Wire. 
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  • Bas|ket>ball: A Game for Young Students Learning Quantum Computing
    It is no secret that quantum computing has recently become one of the trendiest topics within the physics community, gaining financial support and good press at an ever increasing pace. The new technology not only promises huge advances in information processing, but it also – in theory – has the potential to crack the encryption that currently protects sensitive information inside governments and businesses around the world. Consequently, quantum research has extended beyond academic groups and has entered the technical industry, creating new job opportunities for both experimentalists and theorists. However, in order for this technology to become a reality, we need qualified engineers and scientists that can fill these positions. Increasing the number of individuals with an interest in ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum FrontiersPublished on 2019-11-14By Kaitlin Gili
  • Rigetti, CBA test quantum computing’s financial potential
    Researchers from Rigetti Computing and the Commonwealth Bank of Australia say they have taken an important step towards the use of quantum computing in the financial services sector. ... READ MORE
    Source: COMPUTERWORLD AustraliaPublished on 2019-11-14By Rohan Pearce
  • Trapped interferometer makes a compact gravity probe
    Atoms held in place by laser beams offer a new and more compact means of measuring the local acceleration due to gravity, paving the way for applications ranging from geophysical exploration to sensitive tests of fundamental forces. The new device, which was developed by Victoria Xu and colleagues at the University of California, Berkeley, US, exploits the quantum properties of cold, trapped atoms to measure tiny variations in the Earth’s gravitational field. Like other such “quantum gravimeters”, it relies on the interference pattern generated when clouds of atoms, or matter waves, are first vertically separated in space, and then allowed to recombine. Because the gravitational acceleration g depends on altitude above the Earth’s surface (as well as factors such as ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-11-14By Margaret Harris
  • Storing energy in hydrogen 20 times more effective using platinum-nickel catalyst
    Catalysts accelerate chemical reactions, but the widely used metal platinum is scarce and expensive. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e), together with Chinese, Singaporean and Japanese researchers, have now developed an alternative with a 20 times higher activity: a catalyst with hollow nanocages of an alloy of nickel and platinum. TU/e researcher Emiel Hensen wants to use this new catalyst to develop a refrigerator-size electrolyzer of about 10 megawatts in the future. Credit: CC0 Public Domain By 2050, the  aims to get almost all of the Netherlands’ energy requirements from sustainable sources, such as the sun or the wind. Because these  are not available at all times, it is important to be able to store the generated energy. ... READ MORE
    Source: Green-RevolutionPublished on 2019-11-14By research/ media organizations
  • Physicists irreversibly split photons by freezing them in Bose-Einstein condensate
    Light can be directed in different directions, usually also back the same way. Physicists have however succeeded in creating a new one-way street for light. They cool photons down to a Bose-Einstein condensate, which causes the light to collect in optical 'valleys' from which it can no longer return. The findings could also be of interest for the quantum communication of the future. ... READ MORE
    Source: Science DailyPublished on 2019-11-14
  • Physicists irreversibly split photons by freezing them in a Bose-Einstein condensate
    Light can be directed in different directions, usually also back the same way. Physicists from the University of Bonn and the University of Cologne have, however, succeeded in creating a new one-way street for light. They cool photons down to a Bose-Einstein condensate, which causes the light to collect in optical "valleys" from which it can no longer return. The findings from basic research could also be of interest for the quantum communication of the future. The results are published in Science. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-11-14
  • Researchers generate terahertz laser with laughing gas
    Within the electromagnetic middle ground between microwaves and visible light lies terahertz radiation, and the promise of “T-ray vision.” Terahertz waves have frequencies higher than microwaves and lower than infrared and visible light. Where optical light is blocked by most materials, terahertz waves can pass straight through, similar to microwaves. If they were fashioned into lasers, terahertz waves might enable “T-ray vision,” with the ability to see through clothing, book covers, and other thin materials. Such technology could produce crisp, higher-resolution images than microwaves, and be far safer than X-rays. The reason we don’t see T-ray machines in, for instance, airport security lines and medical imaging facilities is that producing terahertz radiation requires very large, bulky setups or devices, many ... READ MORE
    Source: MIT Latest NewsPublished on 2019-11-14By Jennifer Chu | MIT News Office
  • OpenIO Joins iRODS Consortium
    Nov. 14, 2019 — The iRODS Consortium, the foundation that leads development and support of the integrated Rule-Oriented Data System (iRODS) data management software, welcomes OpenIO as its newest Consortium member. OpenIO is a software-defined, open source object storage solution designed for big data and artificial intelligence applications. OpenIO scales easily while delivering consistent performance and can be deployed on-premise, cloud-hosted or at the edge, and on any hardware mix that customers choose. iRODS is free open source software for data discovery, workflow automation, secure collaboration, and data virtualization used by research and business organizations around the globe. iRODS allows users to automate data management by creating a unified namespace and a metadata catalog of all the data and users ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-11-14By Mariana Iriarte
  • Attosecond coherent manipulation of electrons in tunneling microscopy
    Nanoelectronic devices operating in the quantum regime require coherent manipulation and control over electrons at atomic length and time scales. We demonstrate coherent control over electrons in a tunnel junction of a scanning tunneling microscope, by means of precise tuning of carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of two-cycle long (<6 fs) optical pulses. We explore photon and field-driven tunneling, two different regimes of interaction of optical pulses with the tunnel junction, and demonstrate a transition from one to the other regime. Our results show that it is possible to induce, track and control electronic current at atomic scales with sub-fs resolution, providing a route to develop petahertz coherent nanoelectronics and microscopy. ... READ MORE
    Source: SciencePublished on 2019-11-14By Garg, M., Kern, K.
  • Intermediate bosonic metallic state in the superconductor-insulator transition
    Whether a metallic ground state exists in a two-dimensional system beyond Anderson localization remains an unresolved question. Here, we study how quantum phase coherence evolves across superconductor-metal-insulator transitions via magneto-conductance quantum oscillations in nanopatterned high-temperature superconducting films. We tune the degree of phase coherence by varying the etching time of our films. Between the superconducting and insulating regimes, we detect a robust intervening anomalous metallic state characterized by saturating resistance and oscillation amplitude at low temperatures. Our measurements suggest that the anomalous metallic state is bosonic and that the saturation of phase coherence plays a prominent role in its formation. ... READ MORE
    Source: SciencePublished on 2019-11-14By Yang, C., Liu, Y., Wang, Y., Feng, L., He, Q., Sun, J., Tang, Y., Wu, C., Xiong, J., Zhang, W., Lin, X., Yao, H., Liu, H., Fernandes, G., Xu, J., Valles, J. M., Wang, J., Li, Y.
  • NTT Research Announces Eight Joint Research Agreements
    PALO ALTO, Calif., Nov. 14, 2019 — NTT Research, Inc., a division of NTT, today announced that its Physics and Informatics (PHI) Lab has reached joint research agreements with six universities, one government agency, and one private company. The PHI Lab, which is focused on a new computing paradigm created in the interdisciplinary field between quantum physics, neuroscience, and optical technology, has struck five-year agreements with California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Cornell University, University of Michigan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, Stanford University, Swinburne University of Technology, and quantum computing software company 1QBit. NTT Research PHI Lab Director Yoshihisa Yamamoto believes this collaborative framework will advance its goal of rethinking “computation” within the principles of quantum ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-11-14By Mariana Iriarte
  • Jülich Supercomputer JUWELS New Booster to Increase Power from 12 to Over 70 Petaflops
    JULICH, Nov. 14, 2019 — The Jülich supercomputer JUWELS will have a big brother, a so-called booster module, as Forschungszentrum Jülich, Atos, and ParTec have agreed. The module, equipped with several thousand graphics processors, is designed for extreme computing power and artificial intelligence tasks. It is designed as a Franco-German project together with NVIDIA and Mellanox using the co-design process. With the launch of the booster in 2020, the computing power of JUWELS will be increased from currently 12 to over 70 petaflops. This is equivalent to 70 trillion computing operations per second or the power of more than 300,000 modern PCs – no computer in Europe currently calculates faster.
    JUWELS Supercomputer, JSC, FZJThe “Jülich Wizard for European ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-11-14By Mariana Iriarte
  • Mellanox Introduces Quantum LongReach Appliance
    SUNNYVALE, Calif. and YOKNEAM, ISRAEL , Nov. 14, 2019 – Mellanox Technologies, Ltd., a leading supplier of high-performance, end-to-end smart interconnect solutions for data center servers and storage systems, today introduced the Mellanox Quantum LongReach series of long-distance InfiniBand switches. Mellanox Quantum LongReach systems provide the ability to seamlessly connect remote InfiniBand data centers together, or to provide high-speed and full RDMA (remote direct memory access) connectivity between remote compute and storage infrastructures. Based on the 200 gigabit HDR Mellanox Quantum InfiniBand switch, the LongReach solution provides up to two long-reach InfiniBand ports and eight local InfiniBand ports. The long reach ports can deliver up to 100Gb/s data throughput for distances of 10 and 40 kilometers. With Quantum LongReach users ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-11-14By Mariana Iriarte
  • DOE Awards Fermilab and its Partners $3.2M for Illinois Quantum Network
    Nov. 14, 2019 — The Department of Energy (DOE) has announced that it will grant Fermilab and partner institutions $3.2 million to develop designs for transparent optical quantum networks and demonstrate their operation in the greater Chicago area. The proposed Illinois-Express Quantum Network, or IEQNET, connects nodes at Fermilab and proposed nodes at Northwestern University’s Chicago and Evanston campuses. The metropolitan-scale network uses a combination of cutting-edge quantum and classical technologies to transmit quantum information and will be designed to coexist with classical networks. “Our team brings together researchers who are leading the way in quantum communications, classical networking, quantum devices and fast-timing electronics,” said scientist Panagiotis Spentzouris, head of quantum science at Fermilab and the project’s principal investigator. ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-11-14By Mariana Iriarte
  • Quantum physics: Our study suggests objective reality doesn’t exist
    Alternative facts are spreading like a virus across society. Now it seems they have even infected science—at least the quantum realm. This may seem counter intuitive. The scientific method is after all founded on the reliable notions of observation, measurement and repeatability. A fact, as established by a measurement, should be objective, such that all observers can agree with it. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-11-14
  • IBM Joins Stanford Human-Centered AI Institute’s Partner Program
    As a Stanford alum, I am excited to announce that IBM Research is the first founding corporate partner of the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI). Building on decades of research collaboration across computer and materials science, IBM is committed to joining HAI to advance AI research, education, policy and practice that improve how we live, work, play and learn. In this new role, IBM will work closely with fellow AI thought leaders, researchers and innovators at Stanford and through participation on the HAI Corporate Advisory Committee. IBM researchers will also work alongside Stanford researchers as part of the Visiting Scholars program. Across departments and with other academic, industry and government leaders, IBM will work with HAI to collaborate to ... READ MORE
    Source: IBM ResearchPublished on 2019-11-14By Jeffrey Welser
  • European physicists propose huge underground gravitational-wave laboratory
    Physicists from across Europe have revealed plans for a huge underground gravitational-wave observatory that, if funded, could be operational by the mid-2030s. The European Laboratory for Gravitational and Atom-interferometric Research (ELGAR) could be located in either France or Italy and would cost around €200m to build. Those involved in the project have now applied for European funding to carry out a detailed design and costing for the facility. Gravitational waves are ripples in space-time that were predicted over 100 years ago by Albert Einstein. In 2015 the twin Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (aLIGO) in the US along with the Virgo gravitational-wave detector in Italy detected the first gravitational-wave signal and since then tens of such events have been spotted. ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-11-14By Michael Banks
  • Causal order as a resource for quantum communication
    Author(s): Ding Jia (贾丁) and Fabio CostaIn theories of communication, it is usually presumed that the involved parties perform actions in a fixed causal order. However, practical and fundamental reasons can induce uncertainties in the causal order. Here we show that a maximal uncertainty in the causal order forbids asymptotic quantum comm...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 052319] Published Thu Nov 14, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-11-14By Ding Jia (贾丁) and Fabio Costa
  • Recent Development in Hollow-Core Optical Fiber
    Hollow-core microstructured fibers (HCF) has now become a versatile tool for applications ranging from low latency optical communication, ultra-intense pulse delivery, few-cycle pulse compression, UV and mid-IR light generation to biochemical sensing, quantum optics and mid-IR to Terahertz waveguides. These applications call for better performance HCF in terms of loss, bandwidth, mode quality, damage threshold, etc.read more ... READ MORE
    Source: PressReleasePointPublished on 2019-11-14By The Optical Society
  • Building Quantum Espresso With Arm Compiler
    This resource topic addresses how to build Quantum Espresso with Arm Compiler for HPC. Quantum Espresso is an integrated suite of open-source computer codes for electronic-structure calculations and materials modeling at the nanoscale. It is based on density-functional theory, plane waves, and pseudopotentials. Click here to read more. The post Building Quantum Espresso With Arm Compiler appeared first on Semiconductor Engineering. ... READ MORE
    Source: Semiconductor EngineeringPublished on 2019-11-14By Arm
  • DOE awards Fermilab and partners $3.2 million for Illinois quantum network
    The Department of Energy has announced that it will grant Fermilab and partner institutions $3.2 million to develop designs for transparent optical quantum networks and demonstrate their operation in the greater Chicago area. The proposed Illinois-Express Quantum Network, or IEQNET, connects nodes at Fermilab and proposed nodes at Northwestern University’s Chicago and Evanston campuses. The metropolitan-scale network uses a combination of cutting-edge quantum and classical technologies to transmit quantum information and will be designed to coexist with classical networks. “Our team brings together researchers who are leading the way in quantum communications, classical networking, quantum devices and fast-timing electronics,” said scientist Panagiotis Spentzouris, head of quantum science at Fermilab and the project’s principal investigator. “That marriage of world-class expertise enables ... READ MORE
    Source: Chicago Quantum ExchangePublished on 2019-11-13By t-9eaysh
  • Rational transparent conductor design provides a boost to carbon nanotubes application
    An international team of scientists led by researchers from the Laboratory of Nanomaterials at the Skoltech Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials (CPQM) has rationally designed a novel p-type flexible transparent conductor using single-walled carbon nanotubes. This opens new avenues for its applications in next generation opto-electronics and energy technologies. The results of the study were published in Nano Energy. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org NanotechPublished on 2019-11-13
  • Electron scattering experiment is first to point to a small proton radius
    For nearly a decade the size of the particle that makes up the bulk of the universe’s visible matter has been in dispute, with experiments yielding two very different values for the radius of the proton. This disagreement may soon be resolved now that an electron scattering experiment has, for the first time, favoured the smaller of the two values. Since the 1950s, nuclear physicists have been doing scattering experiments to measure the proton radius – or more precisely, the spatial extent of the proton’s electric charge. This involves aiming a very narrow beam of electrons at either gaseous or liquid hydrogen and measuring the tiny deflection of the electrons caused by their interaction with the hydrogen nuclei ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-11-13By No Author
  • Viewpoint: Equilibration in Quantum Systems
    Author(s): Sebastian DeffnerTwo research groups show that specific contributions to entropy may be the key to understanding how and when quantum systems equilibrate.[Physics 12, 123] Published Wed Nov 13, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS PhysicsPublished on 2019-11-13By Sebastian Deffner
  • Eavesdropping attack on a trusted continuous-variable quantum random-number generator
    Author(s): Johannes Thewes, Carolin Lüders, and Marc AßmannA trusted quantum random-number generator based on a thermal light source is attacked. In the experiment, Eve gets access to the light source and Alice’s local oscillator, reducing the extractable randomness down to the one of a vacuum state.[Phys. Rev. A 100, 052318] Published Wed Nov 13, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-11-13By Johannes Thewes, Carolin Lüders, and Marc Aßmann
  • Detector tomography on IBM quantum computers and mitigation of an imperfect measurement
    Author(s): Yanzhu Chen, Maziar Farahzad, Shinjae Yoo, and Tzu-Chieh WeiWe use quantum detector tomography to characterize the qubit readout in terms of measurement positive operator-valued measures (POVMs) on IBM quantum computers IBM Q 5 Tenerife and IBM Q 5 Yorktown. Our results suggest that the characterized detector model deviates from the ideal projectors, ranging...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 052315] Published Wed Nov 13, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-11-13By Yanzhu Chen, Maziar Farahzad, Shinjae Yoo, and Tzu-Chieh Wei
  • Quantum invariants and the graph isomorphism problem
    Author(s): P. W. Mills, R. P. Rundle, J. H. Samson, Simon J. Devitt, Todd Tilma, V. M. Dwyer, and Mark J. EverittThree graph invariants are introduced which may be measured from a quantum graph state and form examples of a framework under which other graph invariants can be constructed. Each invariant is based on distinguishing a different number of qubits. This is done by applying different measurements to th...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 052317] Published Wed Nov 13, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-11-13By P. W. Mills, R. P. Rundle, J. H. Samson, Simon J. Devitt, Todd Tilma, V. M. Dwyer, and Mark J. Everitt
  • Necessary and sufficient condition for the equivalence of two pure multipartite states under stochastic local incoherent operations and classical communications
    Author(s): Dipayan Chakraborty, Prabir Kumar Dey, Nabendu Das, Indrani Chattopadhyay, Amit Bhar, and Debasis SarkarThe resource theory of quantum coherence originated like entanglement in quantum information theory. However, until now proper classification of quantum states is missing under coherence. In this work we have provided a classification of states under local incoherent operations. We have succeeded in...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 052316] Published Wed Nov 13, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-11-13By Dipayan Chakraborty, Prabir Kumar Dey, Nabendu Das, Indrani Chattopadhyay, Amit Bhar, and Debasis Sarkar
  • Microsoft continues tradition of ‘big and bold’ bets for future
    In association with Microsoft. Cloud computing was very much the focus of Microsoft’s TechX Summit in Dublin, in the context of a platform on which great things could be achieved. Digital transformation, new business models, new applications, leveraging new technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML) and quantum computing, were all highlighted as [&hellip The post Microsoft continues tradition of ‘big and bold’ bets for future appeared first on TechCentral.ie. ... READ MORE
    Source: TechCentral.iePublished on 2019-11-13By Frank Quinn
  • Messages from the future
      PM: 23/05/2025 Hi Brandon, long time no speak, though I caught up with your videostream the other day. Along with mum, we must be the only ones left posting to Facebook now. Are you still putting the captures up on TikTok as well or have you moved onto something else now? Maybe you can get some followers to stump up for your next system: I saw all those likes for the formation paragliding over the Taj Mahal. This stuff has come a long way from Instagram filters, hasn’t it? How did you do it? Did you do it a bunch of times or do you get the software to generate all the extras? Well, I’ve got one too ... READ MORE
    Source: Engineering & TechnologyPublished on 2019-11-13By Chris Edwards
  • Quantum transition makes electrons behave as if they lack spin
    (Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo) Combining experiments under extreme conditions with theoretical analysis, researchers pursue knowledge that could be used in the future to create a new generation of sustainable functional materials for use in quantum information devices or superconductors. ... READ MORE
    Source: EurekAlert! Chemistry & PhysicsPublished on 2019-11-13
  • New material points toward highly efficient solar cells
    A new type of material for next-generation solar cells eliminates the need to use lead, which has been a major roadblock for this technology. Solar cells, incorporating the mineral perovskite, have been the focus of attention since the material was first shown to work in 2009. Solar cells that are built using this material are more efficient than current solar panels. Current solar panels capture 15% to 18% of the solar energy on average, while perovskite solar cells have been found to be as much as 28% efficient. But there are major obstacles to using these materials commercially: The materials are not stable, and they contain water-soluble lead, which is a health hazard. Now a team of scientists and engineers led by Letian Dou, assistant ... READ MORE
    Source: Green-RevolutionPublished on 2019-11-12By research/ media organizations
  • Thorium Superconductivity: Scientists Discover New High-Temperature Superconductor
    A group of scientists led by Artem Oganov of Skoltech and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and Ivan Troyan of the Institute of Crystallography of RAS has succeeded in synthesizing thorium decahydride (ThH10), a new superconducting material with the very high critical temperature of 161 kelvins. The results of their study, supported by a Russian Science Foundation grant, were published in the journal Materials Today.A truly remarkable property of quantum materials, superconductivity is the complete loss of electrical resistance under quite specific, and sometimes very harsh, conditions. Despite the tremendous potential for quantum computers and high-sensitivity detectors, the application of superconductors is hindered by the fact that their valuable properties typically manifest themselves at very low temperatures or extremely high pressures. Until recently, the ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-11-12By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Woodside Joins MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab and IBM Q Network
    Nov. 12, 2019 — Woodside and IBM will work together to re-imagine the way work is done using next-generation technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) and quantum computing to help Woodside realize its vision of an “intelligent plant.” Announced today at IBM’s Cloud Innovation Exchange in Sydney by Woodside CEO Peter Coleman and IBM Chairman, President and CEO Ginni Rometty, the collaboration will include Woodside becoming a member of the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab, which is a collaborative industrial-academic laboratory focused on advancing fundamental AI research. Woodside will also join the IBM Q Network, making it the first commercial organization in Australia to join IBM’s quantum computing network. Woodside and IBM will use quantum computing to conduct deep computational simulations ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-11-12By Mariana Iriarte
  • 100 Years Ago, Elmer Imes’ Observations Informed a New Understanding of Molecular Physics
    One hundred years ago this month, physicist Elmer Imes published his dissertation, “Measurements on the Near-Infrared Absorption of Some Diatomic Gases,” in Astrophysical Journal. The paper provided the scientific world with the first accurate determination of the distances between atoms in molecules using his own customized spectrometers; expanded the range of applicability of quantum theory; and provided evidence for the existence of two isotopes of chlorine. Elmer Samuel Imes. Courtesy of Wiki Commons. Before 1919, however, Imes was already making a name for himself in the scientific community through his construction and improvement of spectrometers. In 1916, working under physicist Harrison M. Randall at the ... READ MORE
    Source: PhotonicsPublished on 2019-11-12
  • 100 Years Ago, Elmer Imes’s Observations Informed a New Understanding of Molecular Physics
    One hundred years ago this month, physicist Elmer Imes published his dissertation, “Measurements on the Near-Infrared Absorption of Some Diatomic Gases,” in Astrophysical Journal. The paper provided the scientific world with the first accurate determination of the distances between atoms in molecules using his own customized spectrometers; expanded the range of applicability of quantum theory; and provided evidence for the existence of two isotopes of chlorine. Elmer Samuel Imes. Courtesy of Wiki Commons. Before 1919, however, Imes was already making a name for himself in the scientific community through his construction and improvement of spectrometers. In 1916, working under physicist Harrison M. Randall at the ... READ MORE
    Source: PhotonicsPublished on 2019-11-12
  • Nearby stars could reveal wormhole at the centre of the Milky Way
    Gravity passing through a hypothetical wormhole at the centre of the Milky Way could alter the orbits of nearby stars – according cosmologists in China and the US who are developing new ways to search for wormholes. A theoretical consequence of Einstein’s general theory of relativity, wormholes are “shortcuts” that link distant points in space. They can, in theory, be “dug” through space–time by the immense mass of a gravitational singularity such as a black hole. To date, wormholes have not been observed and it is not known whether they do exist in nature. To establish if wormholes exist, astronomers need to know what observational signatures they should look for. De-Chang Dai of the Centre for Gravity and ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-11-12By No Author
  • NSA’s Deborah Frincke on Quantum-Resistant Encryption
    Deborah Frincke, director of research at the National Security Agency, said federal government agencies should begin adapting their digital security processes for the future amid rapid developments in quantum computing technology, Nextgov reported Monday. ... READ MORE
    Source: ExecutiveGovPublished on 2019-11-12By Jane Edwards
  • Time-optimal control of collisional $sqrt{mathrm{SWAP}}$ gates in ultracold atomic systems
    Author(s): Jesper Hasseriis Mohr Jensen, Jens Jakob Sørensen, Klaus Mølmer, and Jacob Friis ShersonWe use quantum optimal control to identify fast collision-based two-qubit SWAP gates in ultracold atoms. We show that a significant speedup can be achieved by optimizing the full gate instead of separately optimizing the merge-wait-separate sequence of the trapping potentials. Our optimal strategy d...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 052314] Published Tue Nov 12, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-11-12By Jesper Hasseriis Mohr Jensen, Jens Jakob Sørensen, Klaus Mølmer, and Jacob Friis Sherson
  • Manufacturing silicon qubits at scale
    In the past two decades, quantum computing has evolved from a speculative playground into an experimental race. The drive to build real machines that exploit the laws of quantum mechanics, and to use such machines to solve certain problems much faster than is possible with traditional computers, will have a major impact in several fields. These include speeding up drug discovery by efficiently simulating chemical reactions; better uses of “big data” thanks to faster searches in unstructured databases; and improved weather and financial-market forecasts via smart optimization protocols. We are still in the early stages of building these quantum information processors. Recently, a team at Google has reportedly demonstrated a quantum machine that outperforms classical supercomputers, although this so-called “quantum supremacy” ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-11-12By No Author
  • A New Quantum Data Classification Protocol Brings Us Nearer to a Future Quantum Internet
    Quantum-based communication and computation technologies promise unprecedented applications, such as unconditionally secure communications, ultra-precise sensors, and quantum computers capable of solving specific problems with a level of efficiency impossible to reach by classical computers. In recent times, quantum computers are also envisioned as nodes in a network of quantum devices, where connections are established via quantum channels and data are quantum systems that flow through the network, thus setting the bases for a future “quantum internet”. With the design of these quantum information networks come new theoretical challenges, given that it is necessary to establish optimised automated information treatment protocols to work with quantum data, in the same way as current communcation networks automatically manage information. UAB researchers have had ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-11-11By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Woodside reveals quantum computing partnership with IBM
    ASX-listed oil and gas company Woodside has become the first commercial organisation in Australia to join the IBM Q Network, which is focused on the development and use of quantum computing. ... READ MORE
    Source: COMPUTERWORLD AustraliaPublished on 2019-11-11By Rohan Pearce
  • Quantum Computer Made from Photons Achieves New Record
    In the race to create a quantum computer that can outperform a classical one, a method using particles of light (photons) has taken a promising step forward. PAN Jianwei and LU Chaoyang, both at the University of Science and Technology of China, and their colleagues improved a quantum computing technique called boson sampling to achieve a record 14 detected photons in its final results. Previous experiments were capped at only five detected photons. The increase in the number of the particles is small, but it amounts to a 6.5-billion-fold gain in “state space,” or the number of ways in which a computer system can be configured. The larger the state space, the less likely a classical computer can perform the ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-11-11By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • IBM Adds Support for Ion Trap Quantum Technology to Qiskit
    After years of percolating in the shadow of quantum computing research based on superconducting semiconductors – think IBM, Rigetti, Google, and D-Wave (quantum annealing) – ion trap technology is edging into the QC mainstream. Last week, IBM announced its Qiskit QC development framework now supports ion trap technology from Austria-based start-up Alpine Quantum Technologies (AQT). A week earlier US-based ion trap start-up IonQ launched its nascent cloud platform, Azure Quantum, with Microsoft. Of course Microsoft is pursuing yet a different approach in QC. Whether ion trap technology will win a significant place among technologies vying for sway in QC is uncertain. It has some inherent advantages such as not requiring the extremely low temperature operating environment of superconducting semiconductor-based systems. ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-11-11By John Russell
  • Using light to generate order in an exotic material
    Adding energy to any material, such as by heating it, almost always makes its structure less orderly. Ice, for example, with its crystalline structure, melts to become liquid water, with no order at all. But in new experiments by physicists at MIT and elsewhere, the opposite happens: When a pattern called a charge density wave in a certain material is hit with a fast laser pulse, a whole new charge density wave is created — a highly ordered state, instead of the expected disorder. The surprising finding could help to reveal unseen properties in materials of all kinds. The discovery is being reported today in the journal Nature Physics, in a paper by MIT professors Nuh Gedik and Pablo Jarillo-Herrero, ... READ MORE
    Source: MIT Latest NewsPublished on 2019-11-11By David L. Chandler | MIT News Office
  • NASA Outlines SC19 Activities
    Nov. 11, 2019 — NASA will be exhibiting at this year’s SC19 event. In addition to the science and engineering demos happening in the NASA booth, researchers and high-performance computing experts from the agency and its partners will participate in events across the SC19 program and exhibits, including: Sunday, Nov. 17, 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.Tutorial: Introduction to Quantum Computing Sunday, Nov. 17, 9:15 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.Students@SC: Careers in HPC Panel Monday, Nov. 18, 11:30 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.Workshop: A Mixed Precision Multicolor Point-Implicit Solver for Unstructured Grids on GPUs Monday, Nov. 18, 11:50 a.m. – 12:10 p.m.Workshop: Optimization of a Solver for Computational Materials and Structures Problems on NVIDIA Volta and AMD Instinct GPUs Tuesday, Nov. 19, 12:15 ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-11-11By Mariana Iriarte
  • Decomposable coherence and quantum fluctuation relations
    Quantum 3, 202 (2019).https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2019-11-11-202In Newtonian mechanics, any closed-system dynamics of a composite system in a microstate will leave all its individual subsystems in distinct microstates, however this fails dramatically in quantum mechanics due to the existence of quantum entanglement. Here we introduce the notion of a `coherent work process', and show that it is the direct extension of a work process in classical mechanics into quantum theory. This leads to the notion of `decomposable' and `non-decomposable' quantum coherence and gives a new perspective on recent results in the theory of asymmetry as well as early analysis in the theory of classical random variables. Within the context of recent fluctuation relations, originally framed in terms of quantum channels, we show that ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-11-11By Erick Hinds Mingo and David Jennings
  • Duality in Quantum Quenches and Classical Approximation Algorithms: Pretty Good or Very Bad
    Quantum 3, 201 (2019).https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2019-11-11-201We consider classical and quantum algorithms which have a duality property: roughly, either the algorithm provides some nontrivial improvement over random or there exist many solutions which are significantly worse than random. This enables one to give guarantees that the algorithm will find such a nontrivial improvement: if few solutions exist which are much worse than random, then a nontrivial improvement is guaranteed. The quantum algorithm is based on a sudden $quench$ of a Hamiltonian; while the algorithm is general, we analyze it in the specific context of MAX-$K$-LIN$2$, for both even and odd $K$. The classical algorithm is a ``dequantization of this algorithm", obtaining the same guarantee (indeed, some results which are only conjectured in the ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-11-11By Matthew B. Hastings
  • A distinct spin on atomic transport
    One of the more unexpected things that can be done with charge-neutral atoms is using them to emulate the fundamental behavior of electrons. Over the past few years, the group of Tilman Esslinger at the Institute of Quantum Electronics in the Department of Physics of ETH Zurich has pioneered a platform in which atoms cooled to temperatures close to absolute zero are transported through one- and two-dimensional structures, driven by a potential difference. In this way, defining phenomena occuring in mesoscopic electronic systems can be studied in great detail, including quantized conductance. In a pair of papers published today in Physical Review Letters and Physical Review A, postdoc Laura Corman, former Ph.D. student Martin Lebrat and colleagues in the Esslinger ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-11-11
  • Protons are smaller than we thought (and that’s a big deal)
    Protons, the little positively-charged nuggets inside an atoms, are fractions of a quadrillionth of a meter smaller than anyone thought, according to new research. In work they hope solves the contentious “proton radius puzzle” that has been roiling some corners of physics in the last decade, a team of scientists has addressed the question of the proton’s radius in a new way. They discovered that it is 0.831 femtometers across, which is about 4% smaller than the best previous measurement using electrons from accelerators. A single femtometer is 0.000000000000039370 inches imperial, if that helps, or think of it as a millionth part of a billionth part of a meter. And the new radius is just 80% of that. But this ... READ MORE
    Source: FuturityPublished on 2019-11-11By Karl Bates-Duke
  • Communication efficient quantum secret sharing
    Author(s): Kaushik Senthoor and Pradeep Kiran SarvepalliA quantum secret sharing scheme is a cryptographic protocol by which a dealer can share a secret among a group of n players so that only certain subsets of players can recover the secret by collaboration. In this paper we propose communication efficient quantum threshold secret sharing schemes. They...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 052313] Published Mon Nov 11, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-11-11By Kaushik Senthoor and Pradeep Kiran Sarvepalli
  • Quantum steganography over noisy channels: Achievability and bounds
    Author(s): Chris Sutherland and Todd A. BrunCharacterizing secret communication over noisy quantum channels is an interesting problem from both a practical and theoretical perspective. Suppose Alice and Bob wish to communicate secret information so that an eavesdropper Eve will not suspect any type of encoded communication between the two. Cl...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 052312] Published Mon Nov 11, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-11-11By Chris Sutherland and Todd A. Brun
  • Coherence of quantum channels
    Author(s): Jianwei XuWe investigate the coherence of quantum channels and establish a resource theory for quantifying the coherence of quantum channels. To this aim, we define the incoherent channels and incoherent superchannels. This theory recovers the case of quantum states when we view quantum states as a special ca...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 052311] Published Mon Nov 11, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-11-11By Jianwei Xu
  • October ’19 Startup Funding: Mega Harvest
    Seventeen startups took in mega-rounds of $100 million or more during October, with a cumulative total of just over $3.2 billion. Cybersecurity startups continued to be popular with private investors during the month of October, with 15 financing rounds. Twenty automotive and mobility technology firms picked up new investments. Analytics firms, artificial intelligence/machine learning technology, Internet of Things vendors, and semiconductor-related companies also garnered investments. The biggest winners were in various platforms (nearly 40 firms) and software startups, with more than 20 investments. Platforms San Francisco-based Instabase received $105 million in Series B funding, at a post-money valuation of more than $1 billion. Index Ventures led the round and was joined by Spark Capital, Tribe Capital, SC Ventures, Glynn Capital, ... READ MORE
    Source: Semiconductor EngineeringPublished on 2019-11-11By Jeff Dorsch
  • Motions of the planets put new limit on graviton mass
    The motions of the planets have been used to make the best estimate yet of the upper limit of the mass of the graviton – a hypothetical particle that is a quantum of the gravitational field. That is the claim of Leo Bernus at the Paris Observatory and colleagues, who used over a century’s worth of data in their calculations. In theories that try to provide a quantum description of gravity, the graviton mediates the gravitational force between massive objects. It can be thought of as a gravitational version of the photon, which mediates the electromagnetic force between charged objects. A correct theory of quantum gravity has yet to be developed, but it is possible to test some ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-11-09By No Author
  • Transistors with new programming paradigm
    Team simulates nanoelectronics through data-centric lens, gaining a 140-fold speedup on the Summit supercomputer Transistors, tiny semiconductor devices that switch electricity on or off, revolutionized the electronics field when they were discovered in 1947. Originally half-inch-high pieces of germanium, transistors today are mainly composed of germanium’s close relative, silicon, and are about 40 to 60 nanometers in length—more than 1,000 times smaller than the finest grains of sand on Earth. Their size allows electronics manufacturers to fit billions of them on present-day computer chips. Although today’s electronics are incredibly compact, they don’t come without challenges. As electrons flow through transistors, they generate heat that dissipates into the environment around them. And as transistors get smaller, the density of the ... READ MORE
    Source: Green-RevolutionPublished on 2019-11-08By research/ media organizations
  • What’s New in HPC Research: Cosmic Magnetism, Cryptanalysis, Car Navigation & More
    In this bimonthly feature, HPCwire highlights newly published research in the high-performance computing community and related domains. From parallel programming to exascale to quantum computing, the details are here. Exploring transfer learning to reduce training overhead of HPC data in machine learning HPC scientific simulations often generate terabytes (or even petabytes) of data per run, and processing that amount of data for machine learning training can be taxing, taking days, or even weeks. This paper, written by a team from Temple University, Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology, discusses the use of transfer learning to reduce this training overhead. The researchers find that transfer learning can reduce training time without (in most cases) significantly increasing the error ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-11-08By Oliver Peckham
  • Imec Reports Monolithic Thin-Film Image Sensor for the SWIR Range with Record Pixel Density
    Imec, a world-leading research and innovation hub in nanoelectronics and digital technology, presents a new thin-film monolithic image sensor that captures light in the near-infrared (NIR) and short-wavelength infrared (SWIR). Based on a monolithic approach, the process promises an order of magnitude gain in fabrication throughput and cost compared to processing today’s conventional IR imagers, while at the same time enabling multi-megapixel resolution. IR imagers are used in a wide variety of applications, and imec’s new technology greatly extends their possibilities, including surveillance, biometric identification, virtual reality, machine vision, and industrial automation. To date, infrared image sensors are produced through a hybrid technology: the crystalline semiconductor detector and the electronic readout are fabricated separately and then interconnected at pixel or ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-11-08By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • New research synthesizes different aspects of causality in quantum field theory
    In current quantum field theory, causality is typically defined by the vanishing of field commutators for spacelike separations. Two researchers at the University of Massachusetts and Universidade Federal Rural in Rio de Janeiro have recently carried out a study discussing and synthesizing some of the key aspects of causality in quantum field theory. Their paper, published in Physical Review Letters, is the result of their investigation of a theory of quantum gravity commonly referred to as "quadratic gravity." ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-11-08
  • Key Opportunities and Challenges in the Quantum Dots Market
    Quantum dots application in healthcare to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period ... READ MORE
    Source: ReleaseWirePublished on 2019-11-08
  • A Scientist’s Tiny Black Hole Brings the Cosmos Into the Lab
    Single-purpose quantum computers are helping physicists build simulations of nature's greatest hits and observe them up close. ... READ MORE
    Source: WIRED SciencePublished on 2019-11-08By Sophia Chen
  • Empire State Development Announces Round III Finalists of the Luminate NY Accelerator
    Empire State Development has announced its list of 10 finalist for the Lightning Round of Luminate NY, the world’s largest business accelerator for optics, photonics, and imaging (OPI) startups. The event, hosted the evening of Nov. 7 by the National Museum of Play in Rochester, awarded $100,000 to the 10 finalists, with companies operating across the tech spectrum, from quantum security to underwater optical communications. The finalists are listed below. AkknaTek Edgar Janunts, CEO, Kaiserslautern, Germany Product: Lens Reviewer, optical imaging system AkknaTek’s Lens Reviewer assists optical surgeons in implanting premium lenses for cataracts by correcting the lens centration after implantation. The diagnostic ... READ MORE
    Source: PhotonicsPublished on 2019-11-08
  • View from India: Investments in research required for better technology solutions
    Lasers, nuclear energy and quantum computing are considered must-haves of today’s world. We can’t do without them. If you scratch the surface, you’ll find that lasers, nuclear energy and quantum computing are the outcome of a collaborative effort between scientists and researchers. Fundamental science and research forms the basis of many of today’s requirements. This area needs to be encouraged to solve many issues for the masses. All that is required to encourage the next generation is a dose of encouragement and some push. “Can our youngsters find a vaccine for dengue? Can they find an inexpensive solution to desalination of sea water? Can they improve the productivity of our farmers by a factor of five,” said NR Narayana Murthy, founder, Infosys. ... READ MORE
    Source: Engineering & TechnologyPublished on 2019-11-08By Kavitha Srinivasa
  • Mechanical qubit-light entanglers in hybrid nonlinear qubit optomechanics
    Author(s): Victor Montenegro, G. D. de Moraes Neto, and Sougato BoseInterfacing between matter qubits and light is a crucial provision for numerous quantum technological applications. However, a generic qubit may not directly interact with a relevant optical field mode, and hence, one could necessitate adjusting frequencies to match resonance conditions between part...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 052310] Published Fri Nov 08, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-11-08By Victor Montenegro, G. D. de Moraes Neto, and Sougato Bose
  • Time-polynomial Lieb-Robinson bounds for finite-range spin-network models
    Author(s): Stefano Chessa and Vittorio GiovannettiThe Lieb-Robinson bound sets a theoretical upper limit on the speed at which information can propagate in nonrelativistic quantum spin networks. In its original version, it results in an exponentially exploding function of the evolution time, which is partially mitigated by an exponentially decreasi...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 052309] Published Fri Nov 08, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-11-08By Stefano Chessa and Vittorio Giovannetti
  • Experimental observation of conditional past-future correlations
    Author(s): Shang Yu, Adrián A. Budini, Yi-Tao Wang, Zhi-Jin Ke, Yu Meng, Wei Liu, Zhi-Peng Li, Qiang Li, Zheng-Hao Liu, Jin-Shi Xu, Jian-Shun Tang, Chuan-Feng Li, and Guang-Can GuoConditional past-future correlations measure the lack of statistical independence between past and future system measurement outcomes when conditioned to a given state at a present time. Quantum non-Markovian memory effects are present whenever this correlation is not null. Conditional past-future c...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 050301(R)] Published Fri Nov 08, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-11-08By Shang Yu, Adrián A. Budini, Yi-Tao Wang, Zhi-Jin Ke, Yu Meng, Wei Liu, Zhi-Peng Li, Qiang Li, Zheng-Hao Liu, Jin-Shi Xu, Jian-Shun Tang, Chuan-Feng Li, and Guang-Can Guo
  • A new quantum data classification protocol brings us nearer to a future ‘quantum internet’
    (Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) A new protocol created by researchers at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona sorts and classifies quantum data by the state in which they were prepared, with more efficiency than the equivalent classical algorithm. The research was published today in Physical Review X. ... READ MORE
    Source: EurekAlert! Chemistry & PhysicsPublished on 2019-11-08
  • $10 ‘intelligent’ material could make MRI faster
    A new, “intelligent” metamaterial—which costs less than ten bucks to build—could make the entire magnetic resonance imaging process faster, safer, and more accessible to patients around the world. Clinicians use MRI to diagnose medical problems by spotting abnormalities that could indicate anything from a torn meniscus to muscular dystrophy. But MRIs are expensive, expose patients to radiation, and they take a long time—often the greater part of an hour for a single scan. Finding enough MRI time for waiting patients can be a problem, even in US hospitals, but in hospitals in countries like India, waiting periods of a year or more can put patients’ lives at risk. So how do we speed up the MRI process without jeopardizing the ... READ MORE
    Source: FuturityPublished on 2019-11-07By Art Jahnke-Boston University
  • This is the golden age of innovation
    By Paul Dabbar, Under Secretary for Science at the U.S. Department of Energy. The Arrow of Time is a theory from physicist Arthur Eddington describing how time moves forward and what will change. And we can say with confidence that humanity and America are at a special point in time, due to where we are on the prospects for innovation across a wide set of areas. One critical area of innovation is in quantum information technologies. Late last month, Google announced it achieved Quantum Supremacy in computing. A team led by John Martinis from Google and the University of California, Santa Barbara, used a 53 qubit quantum computer to solve a mathematical problem in just three minutes that ... READ MORE
    Source: Chicago Quantum ExchangePublished on 2019-11-07By t-9eaysh
  • Mark Saffman wins innovation award
    Two technical breakthroughs, from the realms of experimental physics and microscopic communities, have claimed top honors from the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation this year. The 2019 WARF Innovation Award winners are: Mark Saffman (physics) and Ophelia Venturelli, Philip Romero and Ryan Hsu (biochemistry). Saffman has developed simplified optical hardware for quantum computing. His technology, recently licensed to ColdQuanta Inc., improves an apparatus for particle trapping, which will reduce the cost and complexity of next-generation quantum computing devices. “We’re trying to push the envelope on how much computation we can do with a quantum computer,” said Saffman. “We currently have more than 100 quantum bits…that’s the largest number of quantum bits any lab in the world has been able to ... READ MORE
    Source: Chicago Quantum ExchangePublished on 2019-11-07By t-9eaysh
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