Quantum Computing News and Reports off the Wire. 
You’ll find the latest news from our most reliable sources, here.  The news, uncategorized, awaiting our review.   Get it first.   Because Quantum is Coming.  Qubit.

  • Northwestern University Researchers Demo Quantum Teleportation using a Chemical Reaction
    EVANSTON, Ill. – A team of Northwestern University researchers are the first to document the role chemistry will play in next generation computing and communication. By applying their expertise to the field of Quantum Information Science (QIS), they discovered how to move quantum information on the nanoscale through quantum teleportation—an emerging topic within the field of QIS. Their findings were published in the journal, Nature Chemistry, on September 23, 2019 and have untold potential to influence future research and application. Quantum teleportation allows for the transfer of quantum information from one location to another, in addition to a more secure delivery of that information through significantly improved encryption. The QIS field of research has long been the domain of physicists, and ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-10-17By Mariana Iriarte
  • Blanket of light may give better quantum computers
    Quantum mechanics is one of the most successful theories of natural science, and although its predictions are often counterintuitive, not a single experiment has been conducted to date of which the theory has not been able to give an adequate description. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-10-17
  • Weaving quantum processors out of laser light
    An international team of scientists from Australia, Japan and the United States has produced a prototype of a large-scale quantum processor made of laser light. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-10-17
  • Quantum Cryptography Market to Rise Demand, Analysis by Revenue of Top Players 2018-2026
    Quantum cryptography is a technique to ensure confidentiality of communicating information. It is a blend of quantum mechanics, which allows to perform various cryptography tasks those are not possible by non-quantum communication. ... READ MORE
    Source: ReleaseWirePublished on 2019-10-17
  • ColdQuanta to Accelerate Commercial Deployment of Quantum Atomic Systems
    Today ColdQuanta announced it has been awarded $1M from NASA’s Civilian Commercialization Readiness Pilot Program. The program will enable ColdQuanta to develop significantly smaller cold atom systems with a high level of ruggedness. This award expands on the success of ColdQuanta’s Quantum Core technology which was developed with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and is currently operating aboard the International Space Station. The post ColdQuanta to Accelerate Commercial Deployment of Quantum Atomic Systems appeared first on insideHPC. ... READ MORE
    Source: Inside High Performance ComputingPublished on 2019-10-17By Rich Brueckner
  • Ultrafast particle interactions could make quantum information devices feasible
    Energy is information. Lengthening the time during which a system is capable of retaining energy before losing it to the local environment is a key goal for the development of quantum information. This interval is called the "coherence time." Several studies have been performed with the aim of retarding decoherence. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-10-17
  • Book review: ‘The Story of Codes’ by Stephen Pincock and Mark Frary
    When it comes to the whole subject of encryption, cyphers and codes it’s tempting to think that we’re dealing with a thoroughly modern phenomenon, a function of living in the wireless digital age. While the authors of ‘The Story of Codes’ (Modern Books, £19.95, ISBN 9781911130895) concede the reasonableness of the assumption in the first line of the book – “the very air around us hums with encryption” – they are quick to point out that there is nothing new under the Sun. According to Stephen Pincock and Mark Frary, we can trace the roots of our encoded secrecy back four millennia. Safeguarding the confidentiality of our communications plays such a fundamental role in our digital finance, social media and ... READ MORE
    Source: Engineering & TechnologyPublished on 2019-10-17By Nick Smith
  • ‘Quantum Paradox’ Experiment Could Enable More Accurate Sensors and Clocks
    An international research team will test Einstein’s twin paradox using quantum particles in a superposition state — an experiment that could lead to more accurate sensors and clocks. The twin paradox postulates that time can pass at different speeds for people who are at different distances from a large mass or who are traveling at different velocities. “For example, relative to a reference clock far from any massive object, a clock closer to a mass or moving at high speed will tick slower,” professor Magdalena Zych (University of Queensland) said. “This creates a ‘twin paradox,’ where one of a pair of twins departs on a fast-speed journey while the other stays behind.” A clock ... READ MORE
    Source: PhotonicsPublished on 2019-10-17
  • ERC grant for research on unusual quantum state
    Martin Leijnse, researcher in solid state physics at Lund University in Sweden, has received a prestigious European Research Council (ERC) synergy grant worth EUR 1.5 million. He shares the total grant amount of EUR 10 million with three researchers from the University of Copenhagen.read more ... READ MORE
    Source: PressReleasePointPublished on 2019-10-17By LundUniv
  • A Quantum Future Approaches
    By Kenichi Ohno, Robert Visser, and Nir Yahav We often think quantum technology is a far-off future. Thanks to decades-long research on the elemental technologies and recent breakthroughs, the emergence of quantum may happen sooner than later. Large enterprises, start-ups, government agencies and research organizations around the world are investing billions of dollars to scale quantum technology from ideation to commercialization. As with any disruptive technology, the speed at which quantum can move from “lab to fab” will depend on the ability of the quantum ecosystem to work together to solve key technology challenges. At Applied Materials, our open innovation approach includes convening key stakeholders and thought leaders around big industry inflections, like quantum, and issuing a rally call to ... READ MORE
    Source: Semiconductor EngineeringPublished on 2019-10-17By Kenichi Ohno
  • Scientists discover fractal patterns in a quantum material
    A fractal is any geometric pattern that occurs again and again, at different sizes and scales, within the same object. This “self-similarity” can be seen throughout nature, for example in a snowflake’s edge, a river network, the splitting veins in a fern, and the crackling forks of lightning. Now physicists at MIT and elsewhere have for the first time discovered fractal-like patterns in a quantum material — a material that exhibits strange electronic or magnetic behavior, as a result of quantum, atomic-scale effects. The material in question is neodymium nickel oxide, or NdNiO3, a rare earth nickelate that can act, paradoxically, as both an electrical conductor and insulator, depending on its temperature. The material also happens to be magnetic, though ... READ MORE
    Source: MIT Latest NewsPublished on 2019-10-16By Jennifer Chu | MIT News Office
  • The Nano-Guitar String That Plays Itself
    Scientists at Lancaster University and the University of Oxford have created a nano-electronic circuit which vibrates without any external force.     Using a tiny suspended wire, resembling a vibrating guitar string, their experiment shows how a simple nano-device can generate motion directly from an electrical current. The research has been published in Nature Physics. To create the device, the researchers took a carbon nanotube, which is wire with a diameter of about 3 nanometres, roughly 100,000 times thinner than a guitar string. They mounted it on metal supports at each end, and then cooled it to a temperature of 0.02 degrees above absolute zero. The central part of the wire was free to vibrate, which the researchers could detect by passing a ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-10-16By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Taking 2D Materials to the MAX
    Discovered by researchers at Drexel University as electrodes for energy applications, MXenes have become a research focus for KAUST. Husam Alshareef and his team specialize in creating nanomaterials for electronic and energy applications. They turn them into devices, such as supercapacitors, batteries and sensors. The chemically active surface and highly conducting core of MXenes make them an ideal candidate material for the group’s cutting-edge materials research. MXene membranes, like these fabricated in Alshareef’s lab, are used for energy storage, sensing and osmotic power generation. MXenes typically consist of a core of titanium and carbon atoms, just a few atoms thick. This metallic material (a carbide or nitride) has electrical conductivity comparable to a copper wire. The upper and lower surface ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-10-16By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Quantum dots technology to revolutionize healthcare and sensing technology: see what’s invisible
    Researchers have invented a new method of producing ultra-sensitive hyper-spectral photodetectors. At the heart of the discovery are colloidal quantum dots. ... READ MORE
    Source: NanowerkPublished on 2019-10-16
  • Microsoft Quantum proves shallow quantum circuits provide an exponential advantage
    We know that Shors algorithm can factor integers on a quantum computer exponentially faster than any known classical algorithm, and that there are problems, such as the simulation of physical systems as posed by Richard Feynman in the 1980s, that quantum computers can solve that would take classical computers more than the lifetime of the universe to calculate.But can we prove that a quantum computer can solve a problem exponentially faster than a classical computer?In 2018, work by Sergey Bravyi (IBM Research), David Gosset (University of Waterloo), and Robert Koenig (Technische Universitt Mnchen) described a problem that could be solved by a shallow quantum circuit but could not provably be solved by a shallow classical bounded circuit. (More on shallow ... READ MORE
    Source: Microsoft QuantumPublished on 2019-10-16By Robin Kothari
  • News from the front in the post-quantum crypto wars with Dr. Craig Costello
    Episode 94, October 16, 2019 Dr. Craig Costello is in the business of safeguarding your secrets. And he uses math to do it. A researcher in the Security and Cryptography group at Microsoft Research, Dr. Costello is among a formidable group of code makers (aka cryptographers) who make it their life’s work to protect the internet against adversarial code breakers (aka cryptanalysts), both those that exist today in our classical computing world, and those that will exist in a quantum computing future. On today’s podcast, Dr. Costello gives us a battlefield update in the ongoing crypto wars; talks about different approaches to post quantum cryptography and explains why he believes isogeny-based primitives are among the most promising; and reassures us that, as long ... READ MORE
    Source: Microsoft ResearchPublished on 2019-10-16By Alyssa Hughes
  • The inner magic behind the Z3 theorem prover
    Microsoft researchers Nikolaj Bjørner (left) and Leonardo de Moura (center) received the 2019 Herbrand Award for Distinguished Contributions to Automated Reasoning in recognition of their work in advancing theorem proving. They’re pictured with Jürgen Giesl (right) of the award committee.Microsoft researchers Nikolaj Bjørner (left) and Leonardo de Moura (center) received the 2019 Herbrand Award for Distinguished Contributions to Automated Reasoning in recognition of their work in advancing theorem proving. They’re pictured with Professor Jürgen Giesl (right) of the award committee. It’s not uncommon for us to hear that the Z3 theorem prover is magical, but the frequency of such complimentary feedback doesn’t make it any less unexpected—or humbling. When we began work on Z3 in ... READ MORE
    Source: Microsoft ResearchPublished on 2019-10-16By Alyssa Hughes
  • Creating and trapping trions at room temperature
    A team chemically engineered carbon nanotubes to synthesize and trap trions at room temperature. Trions are quasi particles that can potentially carry more information than electrons in applications from bioimaging to chemical sensing and quantum computing. The research makes it possible to manipulate trions and study their fundamental properties in ways that have never been possible before. ... READ MORE
    Source: Science DailyPublished on 2019-10-16
  • Cryptography without using secret keys
    Most security applications, for instance, access to buildings or digital signatures, use cryptographic keys that must at all costs be kept secret. That also is the weak link: Who will guarantee that the key doesn't get stolen or hacked? Using a physical unclonable key (PUK), which can be a stroke of white paint on a surface, and the quantum properties of light, researchers of the University of Twente and Eindhoven University of Technology have presented a new type of data security that does away with secret keys. They present their method in the journal Quantum Science and Technology. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-10-16
  • UW–Madison physicist awarded Packard Fellowship
    Shimon Kolkowitz, a University of Wisconsin–Madison assistant professor of physics, has been selected as one of 22 members of the 2019 class of Packard Fellows for Science and Engineering. The fellowship, awarded to early-career scientists from across the U.S., provides $875,000 of funding over five years. Kolkowitz will use the funds to develop his research program in ultra-precise atomic clocks, which he will use to investigate such fundamental aspects of physics as the relationship between quantum mechanics and gravity and the nature of dark matter. Read more. ... READ MORE
    Source: Chicago Quantum ExchangePublished on 2019-10-16By t-9eaysh
  • Quantum dots technology to revolutionize healthcare and sensing technology
    Researchers of the Optoelectronics and Measurement Techniques Unit (OPEM) at the University of Oulu have invented a new method of producing ultra-sensitive hyper-spectral photodetectors. At the heart of the discovery are colloidal quantum dots, developed together with the researchers at the University of Toronto, Canada. Quantum dots are tiny particles of 15-150 atoms of semiconducting material that have extraordinary optical and electrical properties due to quantum mechanics phenomena. By controlling the size of the dots, the researchers are able to finetune how they react to different light colors (light wavelengths), especially those invisible for the human eye, namely the infrared spectrum. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org NanotechPublished on 2019-10-16
  • Researchers demonstrate quantum teleportation using a chemical reaction
    A team of Northwestern University researchers are the first to document the role chemistry will play in next generation computing and communication. By applying their expertise to the field of Quantum Information Science (QIS), they discovered how to move quantum information on the nanoscale through quantum teleportation—an emerging topic within the field of QIS. Their findings were published in the journal, Nature Chemistry, on September 23, 2019 and have untold potential to influence future research and application. Quantum teleportation allows for the transfer of quantum information from one location to another, in addition to a more secure delivery of that information through significantly improved encryption. The QIS field of research has long been the domain of physicists, and only in the ... READ MORE
    Source: Chicago Quantum ExchangePublished on 2019-10-16By t-9eaysh
  • Scientists discover method to create and trap trions at room temperature
    Trions consist of three charged particles bound together by very weak bonding energy. Although trions can potentially carry more information than electrons in applications such as electronics and quantum computing, trions are typically unstable at room temperature, and the bonds between trion particles are so weak that they quickly fall apart. Most research on trions requires supercooled temperatures, and even then, their fleeting nature has made trions difficult to control and hard to study. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-10-16
  • The Future of Quantum Computing, Quantum Networking and Quantum Sensors – The Hague, NL – 29-30 October
    Come and meet ID Quantique at Inside Quantum Technology, a unique must-attend event that offers comprehensive insights into the commercial future of all areas of quantum technology. Inside Quantum Technology Europe is an event that offers insights into the commercial future of all areas of quantum technology, presenting both opportunities available today and future applications for businesses and government. The conference will consist of two major tracks: one covering the Quantum Computing hardware and software sector industry, and one covering Quantum Communication and Cryptography. In addition, there will be sessions on the rapidly emerging business of quantum sensors, NISQ/algorithms and national programs and initiatives. Olivier Pfeiffer will take part on the panel discussion on ‘Current QKD and QRNG systems’ at ... READ MORE
    Source: IDQPublished on 2019-10-16By cremarc
  • Solving the mystery of quantum light in thin layers
    When a current is applied to a thin layer of tungsten diselenide, it begins to glow in a highly unusual fashion. In addition to ordinary light, which other semiconductor materials can emit, tungsten diselenide also produces a very special type of bright quantum light, which is created only at specific points of the material. It consists of a series of photons that are always emitted one by one—never in pairs or in bunches. This anti-bunching effect is perfect for experiments in the field of quantum information and quantum cryptography, where single photons are required. However, for years, this emission has remained a mystery. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-10-16
  • Quantum physics: Ménage à trois photon-style
    Entanglement is one of the properties specific to quantum particles. When two photons become entangled, for instance, the quantum state of the first will correlate perfectly with the quantum state of the second, even if they are at a distance from one another. But what happens when three pairs of entangled photons are placed in a network? Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, working in partnership with Tehran's Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), have proved that this arrangement allows for a new form of quantum correlation in theory. When the scientists forced two photons from separate pairs to become entangled, the connection was also made with their twin photon present elsewhere in the network, forming a ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-10-16
  • Experimental observation of the effect of global phase on optimal times of $mathrm{SU}(2)$ quantum operations
    Author(s): Ji Bian, Xi Chen, Ran Liu, Zhennan Zhu, Xiaodong Yang, Hui Zhou, and Xinhua PengWe study the role that the global phase plays in quantum operations. Previous theoretical works suggested that the optimal (minimum) times to realize SU(n) quantum operations with different global phases are generally different. Here, we experimentally constructed two SU(2) operations with different...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 042315] Published Wed Oct 16, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-10-16By Ji Bian, Xi Chen, Ran Liu, Zhennan Zhu, Xiaodong Yang, Hui Zhou, and Xinhua Peng
  • Synopsis: Undoing a Quantum Knot
    Researchers have observed the decay of a topological knot defect in a quantum gas.[Physics] Published Wed Oct 16, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS PhysicsPublished on 2019-10-16By rss@aps.org
  • Holonomic gates in pseudo-Hermitian quantum systems
    Author(s): Julien Pinske, Lucas Teuber, and Stefan ScheelThe time-dependent pseudo-Hermitian formulation of quantum mechanics allows one to study open system dynamics in analogy to Hermitian quantum systems. In this setting, we show that the notion of holonomic quantum computation can equally be formulated for pseudo-Hermitian systems. Starting from a deg...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 042316] Published Wed Oct 16, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-10-16By Julien Pinske, Lucas Teuber, and Stefan Scheel
  • Sounds of a supersolid detected in dipolar atomic gases for the first time
    Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03045-xUltracold gases of dipolar atoms can exhibit fluid and crystalline oscillations at the same time, illuminating the ways in which different kinds of sound propagate in the quantum state of matter known as a supersolid. ... READ MORE
    Source: nature.comPublished on 2019-10-15By Sean M. Mossman
  • John Fenley awarded fusion patent featuring electric fields that form a penning trap
    after commenting on the recent Navy fusion patent story, he added: “… I, however have recently been awarded a fusion patent of my own, which I invite everyone to examine. It’s very descriptive, and is based on a solid foundation of basic physics. Like most fusion devices, the devil is in the details and I won’t know if it actually works til it’s built… the magnetic and electric fields in my design form a penning trap [see Wikipedia definition, below]. Ions in the trap follow predictable orbits that all pass through the same spot at the same time, once per orbit.” https://disqus.com/by/johnfenley/ —– Abstract: Systems and methods are disclosed herein relating to fusion reactors for fusing particles via multiple ... READ MORE
    Source: Green-RevolutionPublished on 2019-10-15By research/ media organizations
  • Researchers Find Superconducting Material That Could Someday Power Quantum Computers
    Quantum computers with the ability to perform complex calculations, encrypt data more securely, and more quickly predict the spread of viruses may be within closer reach thanks to a discovery by Johns Hopkins researchers. “We’ve found that a certain superconducting material contains special properties that could be the building blocks for technology of the future,” says Yufan Li, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University and first author of the paper, which will be published Friday in Science. Today’s computers use bits, represented by an electrical voltage or current pulse, to store information. Bits exist in two binary states, represented in computing as “0” or “1.” Quantum computers, based on the laws of quantum mechanics, use quantum ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-10-15By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • NASA Awards $1M to ColdQuanta to Accelerate Commercial Deployment of Quantum Atomic Systems
    BOULDER, Colo., Oct. 15, 2019 — ColdQuanta, Inc., the quantum atomics company, today announced it has been awarded $1M from NASA’s Civilian Commercialization Readiness Pilot Program (CCRPP). The program will enable ColdQuanta to develop significantly smaller cold atom systems with a high level of ruggedness. This award expands on the success of ColdQuanta’s Quantum Core technology which was developed with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and is currently operating aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The company expects continued advancement of its technology to lead to compact systems of unprecedented capability, including quantum-based timekeeping, navigation, and radio-frequency field sensing, as well as quantum communications, computing, and simulation. “We believe this new award from NASA is clear validation of the success ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-10-15By Mariana Iriarte
  • Controlling the charge state of organic molecule quantum dots in a 2D nanoarray
    Researchers have fabricated a self-assembled, carbon-based nanofilm where the charge state (ie, electronically neutral or positive) can be controlled at the level of individual molecules. Molecular self-assembly on a metal results in a high-density, 2D, organic quantum-dot array with electric-field-controllable charge state, with the organic molecules used as 'nano-sized building blocks' in fabrication of functional nanomaterials. Achieved densities are an order of magnitude larger than conventional inorganic systems. ... READ MORE
    Source: Science DailyPublished on 2019-10-15
  • Diversity may be key to reducing errors in quantum computing
    In quantum computing, as in team building, a little diversity can help get the job done better, computer scientists have discovered. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-10-15
  • Quantum dots that light up TVs could be used for brain research
    While many people love colorful photos of landscapes, flowers or rainbows, some biomedical researchers treasure vivid images on a much smaller scale—as tiny as one-thousandth the width of a human hair. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org NanotechPublished on 2019-10-15
  • Putting Quantum Bits into the Fiber Optic Network
    Transporting quantum information over long distances with glass fibers and paving the way for the quantum Internet: With this goal in mind, the Dutch research center QuTech and the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT launched the ICON project QFC-4-1QID on September 1, 2019. In this long-term strategic partnership between the research institutions, the scientists will be developing quantum frequency converters that will connect quantum processors to fiber optic networks. The new... ... READ MORE
    Source: Novus LightPublished on 2019-10-15By Anne Fischer
  • Going the extracurricular mile
    (Courtesy: iStock/Milkos)Gaining a degree in physics is no mean feat. As a student, you’re busy completing lots of assignments in many different modules, and tackling experiments in the lab too. So it isn’t surprising that, for most students, extracurricular activities often fall into a black hole of “things you don’t have time for”. However, having a rich life outside your core academic activities is vital when it comes to helping you figure out what you want to do after you graduate, and getting the right job. While good grades are important, students also need a broad range of transferable skills. This includes learning prioritization, communication, teamwork and problem solving; taking initiative, showing resilience and leadership; and developing business acumen and skills ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-10-15By No Author
  • Power/Performance Bits: Oct. 15
    Probabilistic computing Researchers at Purdue University and Tohoku University built a hardware demonstration of a probabilistic computer utilizing p-bits to perform quantum computer-like calculations. The team says probabilistic computing could bridge the gap between classical and quantum computing and more efficiently solve problems in areas such as drug research, encryption and cybersecurity, financial services, data analysis and supply chain logistics. P-bits were proposed in 2017 and can be either zero or one at any given time and fluctuate rapidly between the two. “There is a useful subset of problems solvable with qubits that can also be solved with p-bits. You might say that a p-bit is a ‘poor man’s qubit,’” said Supriyo Datta, a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering ... READ MORE
    Source: Semiconductor EngineeringPublished on 2019-10-15By Jesse Allen
  • ERC Funding for Research into Three-Dimensional Magnetic Nanostructures
    Professor Mathias Kläui at the Institute of Physics of Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz (JGU) has been awarded together with cooperation partners at Forschungszentrum Jülich and Radboud University Nijmegen in the Netherlands a prestigious ERC Synergy Grant. In the “3D MAGiC” project, the partners will explore still largely unknown nanoscale 3D magnetic structures, which show particle-like properties and whose existence has so far only been predicted theoretically. Synergy grants are awarded for groundbreaking projects which, due to their complexity, cannot be carried out alone but only by a team of two to four investigators. The group in Mainz will receive more than EUR 3 million over six years with a total funding of just under EUR 12 million for the consortium. Questions ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-10-14By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • UO’s New Quantum Scientist AIMS to Get Qubits Talking
    England-native David Allcock had unfinished research in Colorado when the University of Oregon hired him in September 2018, so before joining the Department of Physics he was granted leave to finish the job. That project, which he helped design at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, landed in a recent issue of the journal Science. His eight-member team produced the tiniest measurement of motion – down to trillionths of a meter – documented so far of a single electrically charged atom known as an ion. The accomplishment, Allcock said, is a bit of a larger puzzle, which is zeroing in on how to improve entanglement between closely located atoms that normally don’t interact. That connection is a crucial building ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-10-14By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • First Prototype of a Quantum Computer on Superconductive Materials Sucessfully Launched in Russia
    Scientists from NUST MISIS sucessfully launched Russia’s first prototype of a quantum computer. The device working on two qubits performed a specific quantum algorithm, exceeding the previously known accuracy limit by 3%. Superconducting materials were taken as the basis for qubits. Work on the creation of a quantum computer within the framework of Russian Foundation for Advanced Research Projects has been carried out at the NISU MISIS since 2016 under the supervision of Valery Ryazanov, the chief researcher of the University’s Laboratory for Superconducting Metamaterials. The design involves the use of superconducting materials as the basis for qubits. Qubits (quantum bits) are the “heart” of a quantum computer, an analogue of the bits of a regular PC, but far more advanced. If PC “thinks” and counts in zeros and ones, that is, each bit of information can be encoded either as “0” or as “1”, then the qubit has the property ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-10-14By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • 5 Laws of Resilient Innovation
    Disruptive technologies such as AI, machine learning, AR/VR, 5G, quantum computing, autonomous vehicles, et al.read more ... READ MORE
    Source: PressReleasePointPublished on 2019-10-14By Singularity University
  • Quantum Computer Prototype on Superconductive Materials Launched in Russia
    MOSCOWOct. 14, 2019 — Scientists from NUST MISIS launched Russia’s first prototype of a quantum computer. The device working on two qubits performed a specific quantum algorithm, exceeding the previously known accuracy limit by 3%. Superconducting materials were taken as the basis for qubits. Work on the creation of a quantum computer within the framework of Russian Foundation for Advanced Research Projects has been carried out at the NISU MISIS since 2016 under the supervision of Valery Ryazanov, the chief researcher of the University’s Laboratory for Superconducting Metamaterials. The design involves the use of superconducting materials as the basis for qubits. Qubits (quantum bits) are the “heart” of a quantum computer, an analogue of the bits of a regular PC, but far ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-10-14By Mariana Iriarte
  • Quantum Computer Prototype on Superconductive Materials Launched in Russia
    MOSCOWOct. 14, 2019 — Scientists from NUST MISIS launched Russia’s first prototype of a quantum computer. The device working on two qubits performed a specific quantum algorithm, exceeding the previously known accuracy limit by 3%. Superconducting materials were taken as the basis for qubits. Work on the creation of a quantum computer within the framework of Russian Foundation for Advanced Research Projects has been carried out at the NISU MISIS since 2016 under the supervision of Valery Ryazanov, the chief researcher of the University’s Laboratory for Superconducting Metamaterials. The design involves the use of superconducting materials as the basis for qubits. Qubits (quantum bits) are the “heart” of a quantum computer, an analogue of the bits of a regular PC, but far ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-10-14By Mariana Iriarte
  • How to control friction in topological insulators
    Topological insulators are innovative materials that conduct electricity on the surface, but act as insulators on the inside. Physicists at the University of Basel and the Istanbul Technical University have begun investigating how they react to friction. Their experiment shows that the heat generated through friction is significantly lower than in conventional materials. This is due to a new quantum mechanism, the researchers report in the scientific journal Nature Materials. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-10-14
  • Nanoparticle Research Leads to Surprising Quantum Property When Illuminated with Laser
    Oct. 14, 2019 — Particles that are mere nanometers in size are at the forefront of scientific research today. They come in many different shapes: rods, spheres, cubes, vesicles, S-shaped worms and even donut-like rings. What makes them worthy of scientific study is that, being so tiny, they exhibit quantum mechanical properties not possible with larger objects. Researchers at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility located at DOE’s Argonne National Laboratory, have contributed to a recently published Nature Communications paper that reports the cause behind a key quantum property of donut-like nanoparticles called ​semiconductor quantum rings.”  This property may find application in quantum information storage, communication, and ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-10-14By Mariana Iriarte
  • Nanoparticle Research Leads to Surprising Quantum Property When Illuminated with Laser
    Oct. 14, 2019 — Particles that are mere nanometers in size are at the forefront of scientific research today. They come in many different shapes: rods, spheres, cubes, vesicles, S-shaped worms and even donut-like rings. What makes them worthy of scientific study is that, being so tiny, they exhibit quantum mechanical properties not possible with larger objects. Researchers at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility located at DOE’s Argonne National Laboratory, have contributed to a recently published Nature Communications paper that reports the cause behind a key quantum property of donut-like nanoparticles called ​semiconductor quantum rings.”  This property may find application in quantum information storage, communication, and ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-10-14By Mariana Iriarte
  • What’s New in HPC Research: Rabies, Smog, Robots & More
    In this bimonthly feature, HPCwire highlights newly published research in the high-performance computing community and related domains. From parallel programming to exascale to quantum computing, the details are here. Using HPC for rabies response Understanding how diseases spread is crucial to developing strategies for preventing and controlling them – and computer-simulated models of disease spread can be important tools in this process. In this paper from Charles Sturt University in Australia, the authors discuss how a combination of high-performance computing and social network analysis can be used to optimize these disease spread simulations. Authors: Victoria Brookes, Michael P. Ward, K. VanderWaal, Emily Hudson and Salome Durr. Evolving HPC and application design for exascale platforms at NASA As global weather models have evolved, ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-10-14By Oliver Peckham
  • Scientists reveal mechanism of electron charge exchange in molecules
    Breakthrough has applications in data storage, energy conversion, quantum computing. ... READ MORE
    Source: NanowerkPublished on 2019-10-14
  • Crystal Ball Gazing: IBM’s Vision for the Future of Computing
    Dario Gil, IBM’s relatively new director of research, painted a intriguing portrait of the future of computing along with a rough idea of how IBM thinks we’ll get there at last month’s MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab’s AI Research Week held at MIT. Just as Moore’s law, now fading, was always a metric with many ingredients baked into it, Gil’s evolving post-Moore vision is a composite view with multiple components. “We’re beginning to see an answer to what is happening at the end of Moore’s law. It’s a question that has been the front of the industry for a long, long time,” said Gil in his talk. “And the answer is that we’re going to have this new foundation of bits ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-10-14By John Russell
  • Concepts of work in autonomous quantum heat engines
    Quantum 3, 195 (2019).https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2019-10-14-195One of the fundamental questions in quantum thermodynamics concerns the decomposition of energetic changes into heat and work. Contrary to classical engines, the entropy change of the piston cannot be neglected in the quantum domain. As a consequence, different concepts of work arise, depending on the desired task and the implied capabilities of the agent using the work generated by the engine. Each work quantifier---from ergotropy to non-equilibrium free energy---has well defined operational interpretations. We analyse these work quantifiers for a heat-pumped three-level maser and derive the respective engine efficiencies. In the classical limit of strong maser intensities the engine efficiency converges towards the Scovil--Schulz-DuBois maser efficiency, irrespective of the work quantifier.Concepts of work in autonomous quantum ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-10-14By Wolfgang Niedenzu, Marcus Huber, and Erez Boukobza
  • Anomalous Weak Values Without Post-Selection
    Quantum 3, 194 (2019).https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2019-10-14-194A weak measurement performed on a pre- and post-selected quantum system can result in an average value that lies outside of the observable's spectrum. This effect, usually referred to as an ``anomalous weak value'', is generally believed to be possible only when a non-trivial post-selection is performed, i.e., when only a particular subset of the data is considered. Here we show, however, that this is not the case in general: in scenarios in which several weak measurements are sequentially performed, an anomalous weak value can be obtained without post-selection, i.e., without discarding any data. We discuss several questions that this raises about the subtle relation between weak values and pointer positions for sequential weak measurements. Finally, we ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-10-14By Alastair A. Abbott, Ralph Silva, Julian Wechs, Nicolas Brunner, and Cyril Branciard
  • Controlling the charge state of organic molecule quantum dots in a 2-D nanoarray
    A Monash University experimental study has fabricated a self-assembled, carbon-based nanofilm where the charge state (ie, electronically neutral or positive) can be controlled at the level of individual molecules, on a length scale of around one nanometer. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org NanotechPublished on 2019-10-14
  • Erasure decoding of two-dimensional color codes
    Author(s): Arun B. Aloshious and Pradeep Kiran SarvepalliThe quantum erasure channel models phenomena such as loss or leakage of qubits. Using quantum codes, we can recover from such errors. In this paper, we are interested in studying the performance of two-dimensional color codes over the quantum erasure channel. Our approach makes use of the local equi...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 042312] Published Mon Oct 14, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-10-14By Arun B. Aloshious and Pradeep Kiran Sarvepalli
  • Experimental 4-intensity decoy-state quantum key distribution with asymmetric basis-detector efficiency
    Author(s): Hui Liu, Zong-Wen Yu, Mi Zou, Yan-Lin Tang, Yong Zhao, Jun Zhang, Xiang-Bin Wang, Teng-Yun Chen, and Jian-Wei PanThe decoy-state method has been developed rapidly in quantum key distribution (QKD) since it is immune to photon-number splitting attacks. We examine two-basis-detector-efficiency asymmetry, which exists in realistic scenarios. By using the recent 4-intensity decoy-state optimization protocol, we re...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 042313] Published Mon Oct 14, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-10-14By Hui Liu, Zong-Wen Yu, Mi Zou, Yan-Lin Tang, Yong Zhao, Jun Zhang, Xiang-Bin Wang, Teng-Yun Chen, and Jian-Wei Pan
  • Quantum entanglement driven by electron-vibrational mode coupling
    Author(s): F. M. Souza, P. A. Oliveira, and L. SanzIn this work, we show how electron-vibrational mode coupling can be used to drive maximally entangled states. The physical system consists of two pairs of quantum dots, each pair with a single electron able to tunnel between the dots, thus encoding a qubit. The electron-vibrational mode coupling, de...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 042309] Published Mon Oct 14, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-10-14By F. M. Souza, P. A. Oliveira, and L. Sanz
  • Nonlocal quantum correlations under amplitude damping decoherence
    Author(s): Tanumoy Pramanik, Young-Wook Cho, Sang-Wook Han, Sang-Yun Lee, Sung Moon, and Yong-Su KimDifferent nonlocal quantum correlations of entanglement, steering and Bell nonlocality are defined with the help of local hidden state and local hidden variable models. Considering their unique roles in quantum information processing, it is of importance to understand the individual nonlocal quantum...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 042311] Published Mon Oct 14, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-10-14By Tanumoy Pramanik, Young-Wook Cho, Sang-Wook Han, Sang-Yun Lee, Sung Moon, and Yong-Su Kim
  • Distributed sampling, quantum communication witnesses, and measurement incompatibility
    Author(s): Leonardo Guerini, Marco Túlio Quintino, and Leandro AolitaWe study prepare-and-measure experiments where the sender (Alice) receives trusted quantum inputs but has an untrusted state-preparation device and the receiver (Bob) has a fully untrusted measurement device. A distributed-sampling task naturally arises in this scenario, where the goal is for Alice ...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 042308] Published Mon Oct 14, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-10-14By Leonardo Guerini, Marco Túlio Quintino, and Leandro Aolita
  • Enabling entanglement distillation via optomechanics
    Author(s): Victor Montenegro, Alessandro Ferraro, and Sougato BoseQuantum networking based on optical Gaussian states, although promising in terms of scalability, is hindered by the fact that their entanglement cannot be distilled via Gaussian operations. We show that optomechanics, and particularly the possibility to measure the mechanical degree of freedom in an...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 042310] Published Mon Oct 14, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-10-14By Victor Montenegro, Alessandro Ferraro, and Sougato Bose
  • Sultana: The Girl Who Refused To Stop Learning
    Sultana at Caltech, Pasadena, CA Caltech attracts some truly unique individuals from all across the globe with a passion for figuring things out. But there was one young woman on campus this past summer whose journey towards scientific research was uniquely inspiring. Sultana spent the summer at Caltech in the SURF program, working on next generation quantum error correction codes under the supervision of Dr. John Preskill. As she wrapped up her summer project, returning to her “normal” undergraduate education in Arizona, I had the honor of helping her document her remarkable journey. This is her story: Afghanistan My name ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum FrontiersPublished on 2019-10-14By jmgonzalez4
  • Masters programme offers pathway to emerging nano-industry
    A new Masters programme in nanoscience and nanotechnology has been specifically designed to give students the skills and experience they need to work in the fast-moving nanotechnology industry. The course, which was launched in September 2018 by the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) in the UK, builds on the university’s strong reputation for nanotechnology research, as well as its established links with industrial partners in the UK and beyond. According to Dr Joe Smerdon, the course leader, the hope is “to convert some of these MSc candidates directly into employees”. One notable feature of the course is an optional one-year industrial placement, and even the more conventional taught elements of the course will enable students to interact with companies developing ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-10-13By No Author
  • Transparent graphene wearables monitor signs of health
    A third of adults are consistently not getting enough exercise, reported the World Health Organisation in a 2018 study. In addition,  obesity has been claimed to be a national emergency in the UK.  The use of consumer based health and wellness trackers such as smart watches or smart clothing has the potential to increase physical activity participation. Many of these devices noninvasively track vital health signs by optical detection. However, this technology is limited by the need for rigid materials. To overcome this, Emre Polat et al. have developed a new class of flexible and transparent wearables based on graphene sensitized with semiconducting quantum dots. The new technology can successfully measure heart rate and oxygen saturation. It also ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-10-12By Olivia Voyce
  • Radiation detector with the lowest noise in the world boosts quantum work
    Researchers from Aalto University and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland have built a super-sensitive bolometer, a type of thermal radiation detector. The new radiation detector, made of a gold-palladium mixture makes it easier to measure the strength of electromagnetic radiation in real time. Bolometers are used widely in thermal cameras in the construction industry […] The post Radiation detector with the lowest noise in the world boosts quantum work appeared first on Science Bulletin. ... READ MORE
    Source: SCIENCE BULLETINPublished on 2019-10-11By Karina
  • Simulating Molecules with Quantum Simulators
    Being able to simulate how a molecule unfolds or how it reacts with another one to produce a larger molecular compound is an extremely complex task. So far, classical computers or even supercomputers have not been able to model the many-body interactions that occur within such compounds, simply because they do not have the capacity to process this information in a reasonable amount of time. As a solution, quantum simulators have become an alternative approach to tackle quantum problems that overpass our computational capabilities. In particular, they have been used in the field of condensed matter physics and to imitate crystals but, until now, it remained unknown how to simulate the interactions between electrons accurately enough within complex molecular systems. ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-10-11By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Chicago Quantum Summit to Gather International Experts
    Oct. 11, 2019 — Top experts in quantum technology from around the globe will gather at the University of Chicago on Oct. 25 to discuss the future of quantum information science and strategies to build a quantum workforce. The second annual Chicago Quantum Summit, hosted by the Chicago Quantum Exchange, will engage scientific and government leaders and the industries that will drive the applications of emerging quantum information science. Speakers include technology leaders at IBM, Intel, Boeing, Applied Materials, Toshiba Research Europe, the University of Waterloo, the University of New South Wales, Australia, and the Quantum Economic Development Consortium. “The Summit provides an opportunity to build and strengthen collaborations that span beyond our national and academic boundaries,” said David Awschalom, director of the Chicago Quantum Exchange. “Through joint ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-10-11By Mariana Iriarte
  • Shaping nanoparticles for improved quantum information technology
    Researchers report the cause behind a key quantum property of donut-like nanoparticles called 'semiconductor quantum rings'. This property may find application in quantum information storage, communication, and computing in future technologies. ... READ MORE
    Source: NanowerkPublished on 2019-10-11
  • An ultrafast glimpse of the photochemistry of the atmosphere
    Our lives are governed by submicroscopic processes in the nanocosmos. Indeed many natural phenomena begin with a minuscule shift in the states of atoms or molecules, triggered by radiation. One such process has now been elucidated by a team led by Prof. Matthias Kling and Dr. Boris Bergues at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (LAP), which is jointly run by Ludwig-Maximilians Universität (LMU) and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (MPQ). The group studied how molecules that were attached to the surface of nanoparticles responded to irradiation with light. Light-induced molecular processes on nanoparticles play an important role in atmospheric chemistry, and can ultimately influence our climate. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org NanotechPublished on 2019-10-11
  • View from Brussels: EU bankers ready to boost clean energy tech
    As green protests reach new heights of participation and media coverage, EU countries stand on the brink of agreeing a pact that will see the bloc go carbon-neutral by 2050. But that is only a political declaration. Once signed, it will be up to policy-makers to actually chart a course that navigates greenhouse gas emission cuts, technology transition and mindset change. EU emissions fell by less than 1 per cent between 2017 and 2018, so serious  financial investments will have to be made to bridge the ambitious gap. But work is ongoing behind the scenes, away from the spotlight currently fixed on teenage Swedish activist Greta Thunberg and the Amazon fires. The European Investment Bank (EIB), the EU’s triple-A-rated lender, ... READ MORE
    Source: Engineering & TechnologyPublished on 2019-10-11By Sam Morgan
  • Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal
    Researchers at EPFL have created a metallic microdevice in which they can define and tune patterns of superconductivity. Their discovery, which holds great promise for quantum technologies of the future, has just been published in Science. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-10-11
1 2 3 14