Quantum Computing News and Reports off the Wire. 
You’ll find the latest news from our most reliable sources, here.  The news, uncategorized, awaiting our review.   Get it first.   Because Quantum is Coming.  Qubit.

  • Is There a Probabilistic Computer in Your Future?
    Even as the quantum computing community chases reliable systems, innovation continues around developing techniques that ‘mimic’ some of quantum computing’s capabilities but run on less complicated machines. Welcome to ‘probabilistic computing” or at least a step in that direction. Researchers from Purdue University and Tohoku University published a proof-of-concept study in Nature last week in which they created and used probabilistic bits (p-bits) to factorize integers up to 945. The work, led by Kerem Casmari (Purdue) and Shunsuke Fukami (Tohoku), seems to be well suited for classes of optimization (energy cost) problems. If this sounds a bit like adiabatic quantum annealing, you’re correct, although the authors say it can be also used to emulate gate-based quantum computing. The researchers write ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-09-23By John Russell
  • Is There a Probabilistic Computer in Your Future?
    Even as the quantum computing community chases reliable systems, innovation continues around developing techniques that ‘mimic’ some of quantum computing’s capabilities but run on less complicated machines. Welcome to ‘probabilistic computing” or at least a step in that direction. Researchers from Purdue University and Tohoku University published a proof-of-concept study in Nature last week in which they created and used probabilistic bits (p-bits) to factorize integers up to 945. The work, led by Kerem Casmari (Purdue) and Shunsuke Fukami (Tohoku), seems to be well suited for classes of optimization (energy cost) problems. If this sounds a bit like adiabatic quantum annealing, you’re correct, although the authors say it can be also used to emulate gate-based quantum computing. The researchers write ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-09-23By John Russell
  • Industry reaction to Google’s quiet claim of quantum supremacy
    Quantum computing has business potential, though the concept of quantum supremacy is easy to misinterpret. Jumping the shark could result in reduced interest and investment. ... READ MORE
    Source: TechRepublic ArticlesPublished on 2019-09-23
  • Time reversal symmetry breaks in ferromagnetic Weyl semimetals
    Research on Weyl physics is really taking off with no less than three reports by independent research groups in this week’s Science. The first group, led by Zahid Hasan of Princeton University in the US, says it has observed novel topological Weyl fermion “line” and “drumhead” surface states in a room temperature magnet – made of cobalt, manganese and gallium (Co2MnGa) – for the first time. The second and third groups, led by Yulin Chen at the University of Oxford in the UK and Haim Beidenkopf of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, are reporting on the existence of a time-reversal symmetry-broken (that is, magnetic) Weyl semimetal in a crystal containing cobalt, tin and sulphur (Co3Sn2S2), also through measurements ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-09-23By Belle Dumé
  • Launch of the Joint Lab in Quantum Processing
    ICFO and Quside announce the creation of a new Joint Lab in Quantum Processing, establishing a collaborative framework to foster the development of quantum processing technologies. Ongoing research initiatives that began before Quside spun-out of ICFO in 2017 are now beginning to produce salient results, providing the impetus for this new Tech Transfer initiative to produce novel processing technologies that aim to accelerate computational capacity, optimizing computer power and costs. The goal of the joint lab is to use advanced quantum physics concepts and models to solve new challenging problems that have been unsolvable with current existing computers and hardware. There is a world-wide race to harness the power of quantum physics for next generation technologies. Quside, a deep tech ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-09-23By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Researchers create first three-photon color-entangled W state
    Researchers have constructed a quantum-mechanical state in which the colors of three photons are entangled with each other. The state is a special combination, called a W state, that retains some entanglement even if one of the three photons is lost, which makes it useful for quantum communication. Such entangled states also enable novel quantum applications and tests of fundamental physics. ... READ MORE
    Source: Science DailyPublished on 2019-09-23
  • Kevin von Keyserling – Keyfactor
    Kevin von KeyserlingCEO and co-founderKeyfactor Why Nominated: Since founding his company in 2004, Kevin von Keyserling has transformed Keyfactor (formerly Certified Security Solutions) from a security consultancy to a digital identity management solutions provider that manages more than 500 million digital certificates for companies around the world. Over the last year, he closed the Cleveland, Ohio-area company’s largest funding round to date, increased headcount by 100 and oversaw the release of a critical product update. He’s also been spending considerable time developing a roadmap to secure the health care industry. Profile: As Keyfactor CEO, von Keyserling is responsible for company operations, product management, sales and marketing, and platform enablement. Affectionately called “KvK” by his employees, von Keyserling exudes ... READ MORE
    Source: SC MagazinePublished on 2019-09-23By Doug Olenick
  • Steve Grobman – McAfee
    Steve GrobmanSenior Vice President & Chief Technology OfficerMcAfee Why Nominated:  With over 20 years of experience, Grobman has held numerous technical and cybersecurity leadership positions over the years. In these various roles – from his time as an Intel Fellow to his current position setting the technical and strategic directions for McAfee’s next-generation cyberdefense and data science technologies, threat and vulnerability research, and internal CISO and IT organizations, Grobman has spearheaded a plethora of initiatives to support and educate the wider industry on an array of pressing cybersecurity-related challenges. Profile: To better educate professionals about the ways cyberdefense capabilities can become less effective over time, he created the “Grobman Curve.” Unlike software development cycles that show resulting products improving ... READ MORE
    Source: SC MagazinePublished on 2019-09-23By Doug Olenick
  • Heat-Bath Algorithmic Cooling with optimal thermalization strategies
    Quantum 3, 188 (2019).https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2019-09-23-188Heat-Bath Algorithmic Cooling is a set of techniques for producing highly pure quantum systems by utilizing a surrounding heat-bath and unitary interactions. These techniques originally used the thermal environment only to fully thermalize ancillas at the environment temperature. Here we extend HBAC protocols by optimizing over the thermalization strategy. We find, for any $d$-dimensional system in an arbitrary initial state, provably optimal cooling protocols with surprisingly simple structure and exponential convergence to the ground state. Compared to the standard ones, these schemes can use fewer or no ancillas and exploit memory effects to enhance cooling. We verify that the optimal protocols are robusts to various deviations from the ideal scenario. For a single target qubit, the optimal ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-09-23By Álvaro M. Alhambra, Matteo Lostaglio, and Christopher Perry
  • Highly Sensitive Sensors to Measure the Heart and Brain Activity
    Electrical signals measurements such as the ECG (electrocardiogram) can show how the human brain or heart works. Next to electrical signals magnetic signals also reveal something about the activity of these organs. They could be measured with little effort and without skin contact. But the especially weak signals require highly sensitive sensors. Scientists from the Collaborative research Center 1261 “Magnetoelectric Sensors” at Kiel University have now developed a new concept for cantilever sensors, with the future aim of measuring these low frequencies of heart and brain activity. The extremely small, energy-efficient sensors are particularly well-suited for medical applications or mobile microelectronics. This is made possible by the use of electrets. Such material is permanently electrically charged, and is also used ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-09-23By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • ‘Valley states’ in this 2D material could potentially be used for quantum computing
    Physicists manipulate energy valleys in tungsten disulfide, with potential applications in quantum computing. ... READ MORE
    Source: NanowerkPublished on 2019-09-23
  • Fujitsu and PeptiDream Leverage Quantum-Inspired Tech in Joint Research to Accelerate Drug Discovery
    TOKYO and KAWASAKI, Japan, September 23, 2019 — Fujitsu Limited and PeptiDream Inc. today announced that they have agreed to initiate joint research and development in the area of peptide drug discovery, using Fujitsu’s Digital Annealer, which employs next-generation computing architecture to quickly solve combinatorial optimization problems. By combining Fujitsu’s proprietary high-speed, quantum-inspired computing technology with PeptiDream’s advanced knowledge and wealth of experimental data in unique peptides(1), the companies seek to develop revolutionary in silico drug discovery(2) technology. This technology, applied to the field of peptide drug discovery offers researchers the chance to dramatically accelerate the search for drug candidate compounds through improved efficiency. At present, the most widely distributed drugs are small-molecule drugs, which have the advantages, as oral ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-09-23By Mariana Iriarte
  • Even Huge Molecules Follow the Quantum World’s Bizarre Rules
    A record-breaking experiment shows an enormous molecule is also both a particle and a wave—and that quantum effects don't only apply at tiny scales. ... READ MORE
    Source: WIRED SciencePublished on 2019-09-23By Sophia Chen
  • ‘Valley states’ in this super-thin material could potentially be used for quantum computing
    New research on two-dimensional tungsten disulfide (WS2) could open the door to advances in quantum computing. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-09-23
  • CSC to Inaugurate New Supercomputer and Data Management Solution in Kajaani
    September 23, 2019 — The story of Finnish scientific computing continues today as the first phase of Finland’s next-generation data management and computing environment is launched at CSC’s data center in Kajaani. “At the first time, CSC’s data management and computing services are available to all public research institutions, as the services can now be used by researchers at research institutes, not just at universities and universities of applied sciences. This facilitates collaboration,” says Director Erja Heikkinen for Ministry of Education and Culture. The Puhti Supercomputer and the Puhti-AI Artificial Intelligence Partition, designed for AI research and applications as well as other GPU computing, more than double the computing capacity available to CSC. Puhti is a BullSequana X400 system from Atos, ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-09-23By Mariana Iriarte
  • Researchers develop new framework for nanoantenna light absorption
    Harnessing light's energy into nanoscale volumes requires novel engineering approaches to overcome a fundamental barrier known as the "diffraction limit." However, University of Illinois researchers have breached this barrier by developing nanoantennas that pack the energy captured from light sources, such as LEDs, into particles with nanometer-scale diameters, making it possible to detect individual biomolecules, catalyze chemical reactions, and generate photons with desirable properties for quantum computing. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org NanotechPublished on 2019-09-23
  • Google paper claims ‘quantum supremacy’ has been achieved
    Quantum computers make use of quantum-mechanical phenomena such as superposition to carry out calculations rapidly. Quantum computers use ‘qubits’ instead of bits: while bits can be either a 0 or a 1, a qubit can represent 0, 1, or any superposition of these two states. While quantum computers are in early stages of development, a quantum computer could theoretically perform calculations exponentially faster than a classical computer. Quantum supremacy is a milestone in quantum computing, referring to the ability of quantum computer to perform calculates which would not be possible using classical computers. The Google paper describing this achievement, which was briefly made available on a Nasa website before being removed (Google and Nasa collaborate on developing quantum hardware), was ... READ MORE
    Source: Engineering & TechnologyPublished on 2019-09-23By E&T editorial staff
  • Locally accurate MPS approximations for ground states of one-dimensional gapped local Hamiltonians
    Quantum 3, 187 (2019).https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2019-09-23-187A key feature of ground states of gapped local 1D Hamiltonians is their relatively low entanglement --- they are well approximated by matrix product states (MPS) with bond dimension scaling polynomially in the length $N$ of the chain, while general states require a bond dimension scaling exponentially. We show that the bond dimension of these MPS approximations can be improved to a constant, independent of the chain length, if we relax our notion of approximation to be more local: for all length-$k$ segments of the chain, the reduced density matrices of our approximations are $epsilon$-close to those of the exact state. If the state is a ground state of a gapped local Hamiltonian, the bond dimension of ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-09-23By Alexander M. Dalzell and Fernando G. S. L. Brandão
  • Measurement-driven analog of adiabatic quantum computation for frustration-free Hamiltonians
    Author(s): Liming Zhao, Carlos A. Pérez-Delgado, Simon C. Benjamin, and Joseph F. FitzsimonsThe adiabatic quantum algorithm has drawn intense interest as a potential approach to accelerating optimization tasks using quantum computation. The algorithm is most naturally realized in systems which support Hamiltonian evolution rather than discrete gates. We explore an alternative approach in w...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 032331] Published Mon Sep 23, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-09-23By Liming Zhao, Carlos A. Pérez-Delgado, Simon C. Benjamin, and Joseph F. Fitzsimons
  • Quantum teleportation of photonic qudits using linear optics
    Author(s): Chenyu Zhang, J. F. Chen, Chaohan Cui, Jonathan P. Dowling, Z. Y. Ou, and Tim ByrnesOne of the challenges of photon-based quantum teleportation is that both a source of entangled photons and an entangled basis measurement are required. For qubits, one can perform a probabilistic entangled basis measurement using linear optics, making the scheme efficient. However, for photonic qudi...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 032330] Published Mon Sep 23, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-09-23By Chenyu Zhang, J. F. Chen, Chaohan Cui, Jonathan P. Dowling, Z. Y. Ou, and Tim Byrnes
  • Yes, seasoned scientists do extraordinary science.
    Imagine that you earned tenure and your field’s acclaim decades ago. Perhaps you received a Nobel Prize. Perhaps you’re directing an institute for science that you helped invent. Do you still do science? Does mentoring youngsters, advising the government, raising funds, disentangling logistics, presenting keynote addresses at conferences, chairing committees, and hosting visitors dominate the time you dedicate to science? Or do you dabble, attend seminars, and read, following progress without spearheading it? People have asked whether my colleagues do science when weighed down with laurels. The end of August illustrates my answer. At the end of August, I participated in the eighth Conference on Quantum Information and Quantum Control at Toronto’s Fields Institute. The Fields Institute bestows laurels called “the John ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum FrontiersPublished on 2019-09-22By Nicole Yunger Halpern
  • A diamond’s quantum memory sets a glittering record
    Nature, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02766-3Tiny device holds an unprecedented number of quantum units of information. ... READ MORE
    Source: nature.comPublished on 2019-09-22
  • Massively Parallel Computer Aided Design of Nano-Transistors: When Physics Lets You Down
    "In this talk, the capabilities of a state-of-the-art quantum mechanical device simulator will be briefly reviewed, insisting on the developed multi-level parallelization scheme and highlighting the fact that physics can lead to wrong assumptions regarding the best-suited distribution of the workload. This problem will be addressed through a data-centric transformation of the code." The post Massively Parallel Computer Aided Design of Nano-Transistors: When Physics Lets You Down appeared first on insideHPC. ... READ MORE
    Source: Inside High Performance ComputingPublished on 2019-09-21By Rich Brueckner
  • Google claims to have reached quantum supremacy
    Researchers say their quantum computer has calculated an impossible problem for ordinary machines ... READ MORE
    Source: Financial TimesPublished on 2019-09-20
  • Stevens Team Closes In On “Holy Grail” of Room Temperature Quantum Computing Chips
    To process information, photons must interact.  However, these tiny packets of light want nothing to do with each other, each passing by without altering the other. Now, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have coaxed photons into interacting with one another with unprecedented efficiency — a key advance toward realizing long-awaited quantum optics technologies for computing, communication and remote sensing.  The team, led by Yuping Huang, an associate professor of physics and director of the Center for Quantum Science and Engineering, brings us closer to that goal with a nano-scale chip that facilitates photon interactions with much higher efficiency than any previous system. The new method, reported as a memorandum in the Sept. 18 issue of Optica, works at very low energy levels, suggesting ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-09-20By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • DOE Awards Argonne $4.15M for Research in Quantum Computing and Networking
    September 20, 2019 — The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory was recently awarded a total of $4.15 million for research in quantum computing and networking as part of the 2019 Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Quantum Computing and Quantum Network Awards. The awards will fund three multi-year projects in an effort to secure the nation’s leadership in the field of quantum information science.
    A multimodal landscape arising in the quantum approximation optimization algorithm. Dots show points evaluated by a multistart optimizer, which is better suited for finding good optima for this problem than classical methods. Developing specialized methods for such problems will be a part of FAR-QC. (Image courtesy of Ruslan Shaydulin, Ilya Safro and Jeffrey ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-09-20By Mariana Iriarte
  • Researchers build a quantum dot energy harvester
    Over the past few years, thermoelectric generators have become the focus of a growing number of studies, due to their ability to convert waste heat into electrical energy. Quantum dots, semiconductor crystals with distinctive conductive properties, could be good candidates for thermoelectric generation, as their discrete resonant levels provide excellent energy filters. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-09-20
  • DOE awards Argonne $4.15 million for research in quantum computing and networking
    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory was recently awarded a total of $4.15 million for research in quantum computing and networking as part of the 2019 Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Quantum Computing and Quantum Network Awards. The awards will fund three multi-year projects in an effort to secure the nation’s leadership in the field of quantum information science. The three projects aim to advance the development of quantum computing and networking, from quantum-driven algorithms, programming languages, compilers and debugging approaches to metropolitan-scale quantum networks that take advantage of existing fiber optic connections. Scientists from Argonne’s Mathematics and Computer Science (MCS) division and Computing, Environment and Life Sciences (CELS) directorate will participate in two of the projects in ASCR’s Accelerated Research ... READ MORE
    Source: Chicago Quantum ExchangePublished on 2019-09-20By t-9eaysh
  • Government to invest £100m in SMEs to tackle global challenges
    The UK Government has announced a £98m investment, allowing both UK researchers and small businesses to seize the vast opportunities in science and innovation and industries of the future. Of this money, £78m will be invested in 78 scientists and researchers through the Government’s 'Future Leaders Fellowships' scheme (which is run by UK Research and Innovation), supporting many of those working at “the cutting edge of the next scientific discoveries”, including solutions to topics as diverse as climate change and birth defects. “Delivering on our research and innovation ambitions means putting people first, whether they are just starting in their career or are leading major projects in academia or industry,” said science minister Chris Skidmore. “These inspirational Future Leaders Fellows will ... READ MORE
    Source: Engineering & TechnologyPublished on 2019-09-20By E&T editorial staff
  • View from India: Servers redefined
    All essential services in India are available online today. This results in a huge quantum of structured and unstructured data which requires processing in a central location. Another aspect is that the information or data about the concerned individual needs to be protected and that happens through data centres. It’s only appropriate that the resources inside a data centre should be maximised so that the operations are speedy. This includes devices, base station, on-premise server and switches, all of which drive high digital speed. High-speed digital design is the norm today. To illustrate, WeChat users send 40 billion messages every day, YouTube users upload more than 400 hours of video per minute and Walmart processes 2.5 petabytes of data every hour. ... READ MORE
    Source: Engineering & TechnologyPublished on 2019-09-20By Kavitha Srinivasa
  • Time-optimal implementations of quantum algorithms
    Author(s): Alejandro Cros Carrillo de Albornoz, John Taylor, and Vlad CărareIn this paper, we present the general methodologies and framework to evaluate the time efficiency of an experimental realization of quantum algorithms. We do so by describing the factorization of N=15 in an NMR quantum computer (using Shor's algorithm) as an example. We began by simulating a quantum...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 032329] Published Fri Sep 20, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-09-20By Alejandro Cros Carrillo de Albornoz, John Taylor, and Vlad Cărare
  • Validating quantum computers using randomized model circuits
    Author(s): Andrew W. Cross, Lev S. Bishop, Sarah Sheldon, Paul D. Nation, and Jay M. GambettaWe introduce a single-number metric, quantum volume, that can be measured using a concrete protocol on near-term quantum computers of modest size (n≲50), and measure it on several state-of-the-art transmon devices, finding values as high as 16. The quantum volume is linked to system error rates, and...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 032328] Published Fri Sep 20, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-09-20By Andrew W. Cross, Lev S. Bishop, Sarah Sheldon, Paul D. Nation, and Jay M. Gambetta
  • Uncertain fate of fair sampling in quantum annealing
    Author(s): Mario S. Könz, Guglielmo Mazzola, Andrew J. Ochoa, Helmut G. Katzgraber, and Matthias TroyerRecently, it was demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally on the D-Wave quantum annealer that transverse-field quantum annealing does not find all ground states with equal probability. In particular, it was proposed that more complex driver Hamiltonians beyond transverse fields might mitig...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 030303(R)] Published Fri Sep 20, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-09-20By Mario S. Könz, Guglielmo Mazzola, Andrew J. Ochoa, Helmut G. Katzgraber, and Matthias Troyer
  • Nano bulb lights novel path
    Rice University engineers create tunable, nanoscale, incandescent light source What may be viewed as the world’s smallest incandescent lightbulb is shining in a Rice University engineering laboratory with the promise of advances in sensing, photonics and perhaps computing platforms beyond the limitations of silicon. Gururaj Naik of Rice’s Brown School of Engineering and graduate student Chloe Doiron have assembled unconventional “selective thermal emitters” — collections of near-nanoscale materials that absorb heat and emit light. Their research, reported in Advanced Materials, one-ups a recent technique developed by the lab that uses carbon nanotubes to channel heat from mid-infrared radiation to improve the efficiency of solar energy systems. The new strategy combines several known phenomena into a unique configuration that also turns heat into light — but in ... READ MORE
    Source: Green-RevolutionPublished on 2019-09-19By research/ media organizations
  • IBM Opens Quantum Computing Center; Announces 53-Qubit Machine
    Gauging progress in quantum computing is a tricky thing. IBM yesterday announced the opening of the IBM Quantum Computing Center in New York, with five 20-qubit systems up and running and a 53-qubit system expected to go online next month. The latter will become “the largest universal [gate based] quantum system made available for external access in the industry,” says IBM. New additions, including the 53-qubit system, will bring the IBM fleet of commercially available quantum computers to 14 by year’s end according to IBM. Actually, the new “center” encompasses two locations, Poughkeepsie and York Town, with the following systems:  POK has two 20-qubit systems, three 5-qubit systems, and will host the 53-qubit machine; Yorktown has three 20-qubit systems, one ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-09-19By John Russell
  • Sound of the future: A new analog to quantum computing
    Researchers have demonstrated the possibility for acoustic waves in a classical environment to do the work of quantum information processing without the time limitations and fragility. ... READ MORE
    Source: Science DailyPublished on 2019-09-19
  • Appreciating the classical elegance of time crystals
    Structures known as 'time crystals' -- which repeat in time as conventional crystals repeat in space -- have recently captured the interest and imagination of researchers across disciplines. The concept has emerged from the context of quantum many-body systems, but physicists have now developed a versatile framework that clarifies connections to classical works dating back nearly two centuries, thus providing a unifying platform to explore seemingly dissimilar phenomena. ... READ MORE
    Source: Science DailyPublished on 2019-09-19
  • Bridge between quantum mechanics and general relativity still possible
    Quantum mechanics and the general theory of relativity form the bedrock of the current understanding of physics—yet the two theories don't seem to work together. Physical phenomena rely on relationship of motion between the observed and the observer. Certain rules hold true across types of observed objects and those observing, but those rules tend to break down at the quantum level, where subatomic particles behave in strange ways. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-09-19
  • Satellite testing of a gravitationally induced quantum decoherence model
    Quantum mechanics and the general theory of relativity are two pillars of modern physics. However, a coherent unified framework of the two theories still remains an open problem. Attempts to quantize general relativity have led to many rival models of quantum gravity, which, however, generally lack experimental foundations. We report a quantum optical experimental test of event formalism of quantum fields, a theory which attempts to present a coherent description of quantum fields in exotic spacetimes containing closed timelike curves and ordinary spacetime. We experimentally test a prediction of the theory with the quantum satellite Micius that a pair of time-energy entangled particles probabilistically decorrelate passing through different regions of the gravitational potential of Earth. Our measurement results are consistent ... READ MORE
    Source: SciencePublished on 2019-09-19By Xu, P., Ma, Y., Ren, J.-G., Yong, H.-L., Ralph, T. C., Liao, S.-K., Yin, J., Liu, W.-Y., Cai, W.-Q., Han, X., Wu, H.-N., Wang, W.-Y., Li, F.-Z., Yang, M., Lin, F.-L., Li, L., Liu, N.-L., Chen, Y.-A., Lu, C.-Y., Chen, Y., Fan, J., Peng, C.-Z., Pan, J.-W.
  • ‘Traffic Light’ Brings Quantum Waves to a Halt
    Stop! In the name of quantum science and engineering. The familiar refrain relates to a new achievement in quantum technology, an emerging field of research that seeks to harness the unique properties of atoms and subatomic particles. A University at Buffalo-led research team has developed a “traffic light” that can bring quantum waves to a halt. The advancement could be key to harnessing the potential of the atomic world, eventually leading to breakthroughs in computing, medicine, cryptography, materials science and other applications. “It’s an area of research of immense importance,” says UB electrical engineer Jon Bird, PhD, co-lead author of a study published recently in the journal Physical Review Letters that describes the aforementioned work. Bird is professor and chair of the ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-09-19By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Researchers Resolve Catch 22 in Graphene Based Molecular Devices
    The conductivity of Graphene has made it a target for many researchers seeking to exploit it to create molecular scale devices and now a research team jointly led by University of Warwick and EMPA have found a way past a frustrating catch 22 issue of stability and reproducibility that meant that graphene based junctions were either mechanically stable or electrically stable but not both at the same time. Graphene and graphene like molecules are attractive choice as an electronic component in molecular devices but up till now it has proven very challenging to use them in large scale production of molecular devices that will work and be robust at room temperatures. In a joint effort research teams from the University ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-09-19By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Aliro to make Quantum Computing accessible to any Developer
    Today Aliro Technologies emerged from stealth with the closing of its $2.7 million seed round, led by Flybridge Capital Partners. "Aliro’s vision is to commercialize new software technologies that make today’s quantum hardware more accessible and useful for any coder, making hybrid classical-quantum programs the new standard. The company was spun out of Harvard’s quantum computing lab, co-founded by Prof. Prineha Narang, a luminary in quantum computing." The post Aliro to make Quantum Computing accessible to any Developer appeared first on insideHPC. ... READ MORE
    Source: Inside High Performance ComputingPublished on 2019-09-19By staff
  • Team closes in on ‘holy grail’ of room temperature quantum computing chips
    To process information, photons must interact. However, these tiny packets of light want nothing to do with each other, each passing by without altering the other. Now, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have coaxed photons into interacting with one another with unprecedented efficiency—a key advance toward realizing long-awaited quantum optics technologies for computing, communication […] The post Team closes in on ‘holy grail’ of room temperature quantum computing chips appeared first on Science Bulletin. ... READ MORE
    Source: SCIENCE BULLETINPublished on 2019-09-19By science
  • Atos Unveils Global High Performance Computing Test Lab
    ANGERS, France, September 19, 2019 — Atos, a global leader in digital transformation, today officially inaugurates its new global High Performance Computing (HPC) Test Lab in Angers. The new 2,000 m2 test center, which has the capacity to host the equivalent of approximately 48 BullSequana supercomputers, provides Atos’ HPC customers worldwide with the unique opportunity to thoroughly test their supercomputing equipment under real conditions, to ensure it meets stringent benchmarking criteria, prior to receiving delivery on-premise. This reaffirms the presence of Atos and its role in the region, and also strengthens the Group’s unique positioning as the European leader in supercomputing, by supporting both its own and its clients’ work to develop ‘exascale’ supercomputers (capable of processing a billion operations ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-09-19By Mariana Iriarte
  • IBM Brings World’s Largest Fleet of Quantum Computing Systems Online
    Today, IBM announced the opening of the IBM Quantum Computation Center in New York State. "To meet growing demand for access to real quantum hardware, ten quantum computing systems are now online through IBM's Quantum Computation Center. The fleet is now composed of five 20-qubit systems, one 14-qubit system, and four 5-qubit systems. Five of the systems now have a Quantum Volume of 16 – a measure of the power of a quantum computer – demonstrating a new sustained performance milestone." The post IBM Brings World’s Largest Fleet of Quantum Computing Systems Online appeared first on insideHPC. ... READ MORE
    Source: Inside High Performance ComputingPublished on 2019-09-19By staff
  • ‘Poor man’s qubit’ can solve quantum problems without going quantum
    It may still be decades before quantum computers are ready to solve problems that today’s classical computers aren’t fast or efficient enough to solve, but the emerging “probabilistic computer” could bridge the gap between classical and quantum computing. Engineers at Purdue University and Tohoku University in Japan have built the first hardware to demonstrate how […] The post ‘Poor man’s qubit’ can solve quantum problems without going quantum appeared first on Science Bulletin. ... READ MORE
    Source: SCIENCE BULLETINPublished on 2019-09-19By science
  • Tsallis entropy, $q$-expectation value, and constraints on three-party quantum correlations
    Author(s): Jeong San KimWe show that the mutually exclusive nature of classical and quantum correlations distributed in multiparty quantum systems can be characterized in terms of q-expectation value. Using Tsallis q entropy and q-expectation value, we first provide generalized definitions of classical and quantum correlat...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 032327] Published Thu Sep 19, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-09-19By Jeong San Kim
  • A Major Step in Standardization of Quantum Random Number Generators (QRNG)
    Earlier this month, the draft recommendation “Quantum noise random number generator architecture” was consented as an international standard during ITU-T1 meeting in Geneva, Switzerland. ID Quantique was one the main actors of this success. Today’s cryptography relies on sequences of random numbers. Pseudo random number generators currently in use seem to provide random bit sequences, but actually these bit sequences have certain patterns, so there is a risk of being hacked. The integration of physical entropy sources in random number generators is the most common method to overcome this security threat. However, classical physics is causal, hence the unpredictability of a bit sequence generated with classical physics cannot be proven. Quantum physics, on the other hand, is random by essence. ... READ MORE
    Source: IDQPublished on 2019-09-19By Marketing
  • Quantum computation center opens
    IBM continued its push toward large-scale adoption of quantum computing with the opening of the first IBM Quantum Computation Center in Poughkeepsie, NY, bringing the number of quantum computing systems available online via our IBM Q Experience platform to a total of 10. To meet growing demand, an additional four systems are scheduled to come online in the next month. This milestone represents a paradigm shift in quantum computing, marking the first large-scale deployment of quantum computing systems. One of the systems to be released next month has 53 qubits, which will make it the largest commercially available universal gate-model quantum computing system to date. These systems give IBM Q Network enterprise users, researchers, and developers the ability to explore ... READ MORE
    Source: IBM ResearchPublished on 2019-09-18By Doug McClure
  • Registration Is Open for HPC User Forum Meetings at CSCS and EPCC
    September 18, 2019 — The HPC User Forum Steering Committee and Hyperion Research have assembled an exciting roster of speakers for the HPC User Forum meetings that will take place during the same week as the Swiss National Supercomputing Center, Lugano (CSCS) and EPCC/the University of Edinburgh in October. The expert speakers will dive into topics such as the global exascale race, technology directions (architectures, processors, storage), AI, cloud and quantum computing, smart cities and more. The meetings are open to anyone interested. The meetings will begin and end at midday, to make same-day travel easier. Registration and food/refreshments are free, but space is strictly limited. Seats will be assigned on a first-come, first-served basis. Details Preliminary HPC User Forum ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-09-18By Mariana Iriarte
  • Atos’ BullSequana Supercomputer Powered by AMD Processor Sets World-Record
    IRVING, Texas, September 18, 2019 – Atos, a global leader in digital transformation, today announces that its BullSequana XH2000 supercomputer powered by an AMD EPYC 7H12 Series Processor has set four new world-records in server performance. Thanks to the BullSequana’s Enhanced Direct Liquid Cooling system and the powerful AMD EPYC 7H12 processor, the Atos measurements currently top the best published results for two-socket nodes on four SPECrate® benchmarks.* Additionally, it has set a new record for the HPL Linpack Benchmark on an AMD EPYC CPU, with an 11% increase in performance.** These measure how hardware systems perform under compute-intensive workloads based on real-world applications. The BullSequana surpasses previous records*** (records using both AMD and non-AMD processors) for all 5 benchmarks. The BullSequana ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-09-18By Mariana Iriarte
  • New Method that can Simulate Nanoelectronics Earns Researchers Gordon Bell Prize Nomination
    September 18, 2019 — Chip manufacturers are already assembling transistors that measure just a few nanometres across. They are much smaller than a human hair, whose diameter is approximately 20,000 nanometres in the case of finer strands. Now, demand for increasingly powerful supercomputers is driving the industry to develop components that are even smaller and yet more powerful at the same time. Nomination for the Gordon Bell Prize However, in addition to physical laws that make it harder to build ultra-scaled transistors, the problem of the ever increasing heat dissipation is putting manufacturers in a tricky situation – partly due to steep rises in cooling requirements and the resulting demand for energy. Cooling ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-09-18By Mariana Iriarte
  • Team closes in on ‘holy grail’ of room temperature quantum computing chips
    To process information, photons must interact. However, these tiny packets of light want nothing to do with each other, each passing by without altering the other. Now, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have coaxed photons into interacting with one another with unprecedented efficiency—a key advance toward realizing long-awaited quantum optics technologies for computing, communication and remote sensing. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-09-18
  • Closing in on ‘holy grail’ of room temperature quantum computing chips
    To process information, photons must interact. However, these tiny packets of light want nothing to do with each other, each passing by without altering the other. Now, researchers have coaxed photons into interacting with one another with unprecedented efficiency -- a key advance toward realizing long-awaited quantum optics technologies for computing, communication and remote sensing. ... READ MORE
    Source: Science DailyPublished on 2019-09-18
  • IBM’s Public Cloud set for 53-Qubit Quantum Computing Boost
    The quantum computing system will be the single largest universal quantum system made available for...Read More »© SDxCentral, LLC. Use of this feed is limited to personal, non-commercial use and is governed by SDxCentral's Terms of Use (https://www.sdxcentral.com/legal/terms-of-service/). Publishing this feed for public or commercial use and/or misrepresentation by a third party is prohibited. ... READ MORE
    Source: sdx centralPublished on 2019-09-18By Dan Meyer
  • A Quantum Leap
    We hear a lot these days about the coming quantum revolution. Efforts to understand, develop, and characterize quantum materials — defined broadly as those displaying characteristics that can be explained only by quantum mechanics and not by classical physics — are intensifying. Researchers around the world are racing to understand these materials and harness their unique qualities to develop revolutionary quantum technologies for quantum computing, communications, sensing, simulation and other quantum technologies not yet imaginable. This week, UC Santa Barbara stepped to the front of that worldwide research race by being named the site of the nation’s first Quantum Foundry. Funded by an initial six-year, $25-million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the project, known officially as the UC Santa ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-09-18By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • All-Electronic Two-Dimensional Spin Transistors
    Physicists from the University of Groningen constructed a two-dimensional spin transistor, in which spin currents were generated by an electric current through graphene. A monolayer of a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) was placed on top of a graphene to induce charge-to-spin conversion in the graphene. This experimental observation was described in an article in Nano Letters on 27 August 2019. Spintronics is an attractive alternative way of creating low-power electronic devices. It is not based on a charge current but on a current of electron spins. Spin is a quantum mechanical property of an electron, a magnetic moment that could be used to transfer or store information. Talieh Ghiasi and Bart van Wees in the cleanroom | Photo University of Groningen ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-09-18By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Researchers are performing integer factorization using modified MRAM
    Ease of scaling could make probabilistic computing competitive with current-day quantum computers, though limitations of the design prompt researchers to dub it the "poor man's qubit." ... READ MORE
    Source: TechRepublic ArticlesPublished on 2019-09-18
  • ‘Poor man’s qubit’ can solve quantum problems without going quantum
    It may still be decades before quantum computers are ready to solve problems that today's classical computers aren't fast or efficient enough to solve, but the emerging "probabilistic computer" could bridge the gap between classical and quantum computing. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-09-18
  • In latest quantum milestone, IBM unveils its first 53-qubit computer
    Qubit by qubit, researchers are inching closer towards making large-scale quantum computing a reality. IBM Corp. today revealed that it has developed a quantum computer with more than twice the processing components as its previous largest machines. The new system packs 53 qubits compared to the earlier models’ 20 and features a number of major […] The post In latest quantum milestone, IBM unveils its first 53-qubit computer appeared first on SiliconANGLE. ... READ MORE
    Source: siliconANGLEPublished on 2019-09-18By Maria Deutscher
  • When in Rome: AMD Announces New Epyc CPU for HPC, Server and Cloud Wins
    Where else but Rome could AMD hold the official Europe launch party for its second generation of Epyc microprocessors, codenamed Rome. Today, AMD did just that announcing key server wins, important cloud provider wins – including IBM Cloud – introduction of a new 64-core, 280-watt CPU aimed at high-end HPC, and indulging in some chest-thumping around performance metrics. And that’s not all. Yesterday, Dell EMC announced five new servers based on second-gen Epyc. You get the picture. For AMD recently, it’s been (almost) all sunshine and haymaking. There’s also been a noticeable shift in positioning. When AMD plunged back into the datacenter market in 2017, contrition for past error and emphasis on competitive TCO (cum solid technology) were the main ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-09-18By John Russell
  • How will quantum computing change our society?
    By Fred Chong, Seymour Goodman Professor, University of Chicago Quantum computing is the only technology in which every device that we add to a machine doubles the potential computing power of the machine. If we can overcome the challenges in developing practical algorithms, software and machines, quantum computing could solve some problems where computation grows too quickly (exponentially in the size of the input) for classical machines. In the short term, quantum computing will change our understanding of the aforementioned sciences that fundamentally rely on understanding the behavior of electrons. A classical computer uses an exponential number of bits (electrons) to model the positions of electrons and how they change. Obviously, nature only uses one electron to “model” each electron in a molecule. Quantum computers ... READ MORE
    Source: Chicago Quantum ExchangePublished on 2019-09-18By t-9eaysh
  • DOE Funds Quantum Computing and Networking Research
    Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $60.7 million in funding to advance the development of quantum computing and networking. "We are on the threshold of a new era in Quantum Information Science and quantum computing and networking, with potentially great promise for science and society,” said Under Secretary of Science Paul Dabbar. “These projects will help ensure U.S. leadership in these important new areas of science and technology.” The post DOE Funds Quantum Computing and Networking Research appeared first on insideHPC. ... READ MORE
    Source: Inside High Performance ComputingPublished on 2019-09-18By staff
  • IBM Opens Quantum Computation Center in New York
    ARMONK, N.Y.September 18, 2019 — Today, IBM announced the opening of the IBM Quantum Computation Center in New York State. The new center expands the world’s largest fleet of quantum computing systems for commercial and research activity that exist beyond the confines of experimental lab environments. The IBM Quantum Computation Center will support the growing needs of a community of over 150,000 registered users and nearly 80 commercial clients, academic institutions and research laboratories to advance quantum computing and explore practical applications. The global community of users have run more than 14 million experiments on IBM’s quantum computers through the cloud since 2016, and published more than 200 scientific papers. To meet growing demand for access to real quantum hardware, ten quantum computing systems ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-09-18By Mariana Iriarte
  • Quantum Computing Software Startup Aliro Emerges From Stealth Mode
    There are a lot of different types of quantum computers. Arguably, none of them are ready to make a difference in the real world. But some startups are betting that they’re getting so close that it’s time to make it easy for regular software developers to take advantage of these machines. Boston-based Aliro Technologies is one such startup. Aliro emerged from stealth mode today, revealing that it had attracted US $2.7 million from investors that include Crosslink Ventures, Flybridge Capital Partners, and Samsung NEXT’s Q Fund. The company was founded by Harvard assistant professor of computational materials science, Prineha Narang, along with two of her students, and a post-doctoral researcher. Aliro plans a software stack that will allow ordinary developers to first ... READ MORE
    Source: IEEE Spectrum SemiconductorsPublished on 2019-09-18By Samuel K. Moore
  • Aliro Technologies helps developers write quantum apps once and run them anywhere
    Startup Aliro Technologies is emerging from stealth today, landing $2.7 million in a seed funding round for its mission to democratize quantum computing. Flybridge Capital Partners led the round, which also saw the participation of Crosslink Ventures and Samsung NEXT’s Q fund. Aliro began its life as a project at Harvard University’s quantum computing lab. There, […] The post Aliro Technologies helps developers write quantum apps once and run them anywhere appeared first on SiliconANGLE. ... READ MORE
    Source: siliconANGLEPublished on 2019-09-18By Mike Wheatley
  • Aliro aims to make quantum computers usable by traditional programmers
    Different quantum designs are suited to different workloads. Aliro hopes to provide a common platform to minimize differences and make it easier for businesses to adopt quantum. ... READ MORE
    Source: TechRepublic ArticlesPublished on 2019-09-18
  • DOE Awards ORNL Researchers $11M to Advance Quantum Technologies
    OAK RIDGE, Tenn., September 18, 2019—Three researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory will lead or participate in collaborative research projects aimed at harnessing the power of quantum mechanics to advance a range of technologies including computing, fiber optics and network communication. The application of quantum mechanics to computing and the processing of information holds enormous potential for scientific discovery and innovation. ORNL’s established programs in these domains make it an ideal partner in the quest to advance quantum technologies for applications in science and national security.
    ORNL staff are participating in three different quantum projects funded by DOE’s Advanced Scientific Computing Research program. Image courtesy of Carlos Jones/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy.Quantum ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-09-18By Mariana Iriarte
  • First 53-qubit IBM Q system to roll out at NY Quantum Computation Center
    IBM's new Quantum Computation Center in Armonk, NY will be home to 14 quantum computers, with cloud-delivered access to enterprises and academia. ... READ MORE
    Source: TechRepublic ArticlesPublished on 2019-09-18
  • Deep Tissue Project Expected to Boost 3-Photon Microscopy
    Heriot-Watt University is collaborating with laser specialist Chromacity Ltd. and microscope manufacturer Scientifica on the development of a laser designed for deep tissue analysis. Once completed, the laser could have applications in regenerative medicine, leukemia and Alzheimer’s disease, according to research fellow and project lead Richard McCracken from the university's Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences (IPAQS). The project, aptly named Deep Tissue, builds upon research carried out by IPAQS professor Derryck Reid. It promises to provide a laser capable of gathering tissue data to a depth more than double the level that lasers currently on the market can analyze. A Chromacity ultrafast laser in operation. ... READ MORE
    Source: PhotonicsPublished on 2019-09-18
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