IBM Powering Up Cybersecurity Against Quantum Computing

Prepare for Future Security Threats

Selected notes ~

+  No longer can you store and secure all of your data on a single server like you could 20 years ago. We’re in the era of cloud, the Internet of Things and mobile devices. Data no longer exists in a single, central place, but is distributed on all kind of devices, which creates security challenges. New technologies such as artificial intelligence and quantum computing promise immense improvements in how clients, partners and IBM run their businesses. On the flip side, these technologies offer new capabilities that could be leveraged for malicious activities and attacks.

Recent times have shown that security is more important than ever. Companies across industries and employees at all levels list security and compliance as one of their top concerns and have to make it a priority.

+  IBM has begun developing solutions to prevent and counter malicious usage of these new technologies. One example is its collaboration with NIST on post-quantum cryptography; factorization algorithms will no longer be sufficient in the era of quantum computing due to the incredible computing power. One such algorithm under consideration by NIST is CRYSTALS-Kyber from the IBM Research lab in Zurich, which is derived from lattice problems. We’ve already have seen good results for CRYSTALS-Kyber key generation, encryption and decryption on our POWER9 systems.

+  The Power platform is open, and that’s one of IBM’s value propositions as well. In contrast to its enterprise systems, open Power Systems servers run KVM as their hypervisor and IBM is investing in that space in terms of security as well. Later this year IBM plans to launch its Protected Execution Facility, introducing the concept of secure objects to make sure sensitive workloads can be appropriately secured. This allows clients to run sensitive workloads in secure memory. Clients will know they are protected even if the KVM hypervisor was compromised.

Source:  IBM Systems.  Petra Bührer,  Prepare for Future Security Threats…

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