Rather quick synopsis of five leading QaaS providers: Amazon, QuTech, D-Wave, Honeywell, Strangeworks (yes, Whurley has gotten the show on the road pretty far, actually). Worth the read from the link provided, below. As we all know, “Because Qauntum is Coming.” Qubit

A buyer’s guide to quantum as a service: Qubits for hire

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+  Steve Jobs is widely quoted to have said, “A lot of times, people don’t know what they want until you show it to them.” A quantum computing (QC) service is hard enough to understand when it’s explained to you plainly. The promise of QC relies upon its ability to leverage something weird to accomplish something fantastic. Thing is, we’re not quite at “fantastic” yet, and by the time we get there, things may no longer be so weird.

If you have a hankering to wangle a Hadamard gate or two, to produce a Hamiltonian whose yield is better than anything classical physics can cough up, then at last there’s a service for you. Or perhaps there is and isn’t one at the same time.

 

+  Here’s the general idea: The first quantum computing (QC) services, or quantum-like services, being offered to commercial customers are experiments. They are ways to stage scientific functions, in an effort to learn where a quantum-oriented market might be. That’s important because QC researchers need to be able to tap into this market as early as possible (assuming it exists) if they are to generate the capital investments necessary to actually grow such a market in the first place.

+  To give you a better sense of where this market stands at the moment, we’ve selected five organizations — some commercial, some academic, and some which blend the two — which offer some kind of a quantum computing service that incorporates real QCs performing true quantum functions. The expectation is that customers will be able to subscribe to quantum services much the same way they do to cloud services today, whether that’s a first or at some eventual point in time. The thing with quantum is, time ends up more often than not being a variable.

Source:  ZD Net.  Scott Fulton III,  A buyer’s guide to quantum as a service: Qubits for hire…

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