Image of a Single Strontium Atom; Quantum Applications

The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) has awarded Mr. David Nadlinger the top prize in the annual science photgoraphy competition. The full size image, titled “Single Atom in an Ion Trap”, clearly shows the pale blue dot of a single, positively-charged strontium atom, suspended by magentic fields. A possible, practical application of this atom is use in quantum computing.

Single Atom in Ion – Overall Winner and 1st Equipment and Facilities – Mr David Nadlinger, University of Oxford

The image and details are found here…

“Single Photon based Quantum Technologies”

The final days of May 2018 will see an international symposium on “Single Photon based Quantum Technologies”. Topics to be discussed will focus on quantum technologies utilizing single photons as their basis. Goes to show the scientists and research teams are forging ahead to make quantum computing a reality.

More details are found here at PicoQuant…

A Quantum Internet {For Europe}

Or is it ARPANET, albeit the quantum version? Plans, at least conceptually, have been developed in part with researchers at Delft University, to create a quantum network. Though focused on connecting four cities in the Netherlands, the project is looking to expand continent-wide. The expanded project, dubbed, the “Quantum Internet Alliance”, is attempting to design a quantum internet. Well worth the read.

This report is found here…

High-Dimensional Frequency-Based Quantum Computing

Oak Ridge National Labs and the U.S. Department of Energy have split light beams into their constituent frequency modes. This permits selected frequencies to encode quantum data into photons. The ‘so what’ is that the demonstration will likely advance distributed quantum computing.

This report is found here…

Topological Superconductor Wanted

Decoherence, the inability of photons to maintain superposition (ergo, being unable to retain usefulness to quantum computing), is a major hurdle in the road to quantum computers. This team of researchers suggests they have an alternative — Majorana fermions hosted on a superconductor. Read on to this latest development and possible new avenue toward quantum supremacy.

This report is found at NEW ATLAS…

Steering Your Photons

Arguably, the biggest challenge to quantum computing is the fragility of the photon. A team at the Univeristy of Mayland’s Joint Quantum Institute has developed a chip which is able to steer photons, unhindered. Unlike the internet where packets in the form of light can suffer some loss and retain usefulness, quantum systems require the fragile photons maintain integrity. Uses for this quantum photonic chip are revealed in the article.

This report is found at the A. James Clark School of Engineering…

Convey Basic Quantum Computing Knowledge For Your CIO…

The team at CIO.com has published an elevator pitch to give to your CIO. Just don’t forget to mention the threat to your systems and data as the elevator door closes. Quick read.

This report is found here at CIO.com…

What Is The Quantum Computing Equivalent of a Wire?

Light. Researchers across several institutes have managed to harness electromagnetic wave properties of light, encoding the spin state with the light’s electric field. One step further and you have this coupled photon delivering the spin state to another qubit…

This report from Princeton University is found at EurekAlert!

The advent of quantum computing with practical applications has gained pace. A few years back quantum supremacy was envisioned at 10 years out; now, five years out. Its time for the cyber security world to get into shape, and fast; though, we could have it all wrong.

This report is found here…

Too Primitive To Deliver…

While the excitement of quantum computing builds, we must keep-in-check the possibility that quantum supremacy may not take place. In this article from Quantamagazine, we are presented with counter-arguments to the race for quantum computing — and its noisy.

This report is found at…

Making Error Correction Feasible…

Error correction is critical to making quantum computing succeed. Recent U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) awards have put $1.3M (USD) into the coffers of researchers. Texas A & M is fortunate to have the research team and the funding to work on one of the “best bets” to reducing errors imposed during transmission of quantum computer data into classical computing systems. This aspect plays a large part in banking transactions; that level of security necessitates finding quantum-secure algorithms and other methods to maintain security in a post-quantum cryptogrpahy world.

This report is found at THE BATTALION…

Two Words: Potential and Primitive.

What does it take to build a quantum computing company startup? There are many angles and obstacles. But the technology is primitive and the potential is enormous. How far out is any real return on invesetment? 5, 10, 15 years or more? How does a quantum startup compete against Big Blue, Google, Microsoft, and, well, D-Wave and Rigetti?

This report is found at THENEXTPLATFORM…

Why Is China Winning?

If you believe all you read, China should be winning the quantum computing race. If you don’t believe all you read, try watching. This 3 minute video discusses China and its advances in quantum computing — and why the Chinese are winning.

This report is found at TECHINASIA…

Is It Here, Finally?

Some say quantum computing is nearly here, some say it is already here. So which is it? This article lends additional coverage to Google’s and Microsoft’s (and others) race for practical quantum computing.

This report is found here…

“Entropy Accumulation”

If one sums up the entropy of their large system, including all of its parts, you have “entropy accumulation”. The research provided in this quantum-cryptographic-security-related-protocol article discusses this property as a proof for device-independent quantum key distribution. Set aside some time; there’s even some Bob, Alice, and Eve, in this one.

This report is found at Nature.com…

Using Your Fridge To Cool Quantum Devices…

Noise. Heat is considered noise in the quantum computing arena. A new method to mitigate the issue has been theoretically proven to work. Akin to using a ‘fridge’, this group of physicists has a new method to control heat flow; a sort of insulation. The Institute of Science and Technology of Austria has published this new report.

A mechanical system is coupled to two electromagnetic cavities and a heat bath, is proposed as a realization. In this model, the two systems are also connected to their own heat baths. (c) by Shabir Barzanjeh, André Xuereb & Matteo Aquilina

This report is found here…

Guess Again, FrodoKEM! Quantum-Safe Submissions for NIST’s Post-Quantum Cryptography Project

CRYSTALS DILITHIUM, Gravity-SPHINCS and HiMQ-3 are just several of the 50+ submissions to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) project to define quantum-safe algorithms. Round 1 submissions have closed and the algorithms are under close review. NIST has posted details for each of the submissions as well as dates and details for the First Post-Quantum Cryptography Standardization Conference (PQCrypto 2018) slated for mid-April 2018. Topics will include lattice-based, code-based, and other cryptosystems with potential to be secure from quantum systems; as well, topics covering post-quantum security models and implementations are expected.

PQC Algorithms are found here at NIST…

PQC Standardization Conference details are here…