Latest Quantum Computing Reports

Latest Quantum Computing Reports.  You’ll find the latest news from our most reliable sources, here.  The news, uncategorized, awaiting our review.   Get it first.   Because Quantum is Coming.  Qubit.

  • How To Solve Real Problems On Modern Quantum Computers
    In recent years, quantum devices have become available that enable researchers — for the first time — to use real quantum hardware to begin to solve scientific problems. However, in the near term, the number and quality of qubits (the basic unit of quantum information) for quantum computers are expected to remain limited, making it difficult to use these machines for practical applications.A hybrid quantum and classical approach may be the answer to tackling this problem with existing quantum hardware. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, along with researchers at Clemson University and Fujitsu Laboratories of America, have developed hybrid algorithms to run on quantum machines and have demonstrated them ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-07-15By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Physicists find first possible 3-D quantum spin liquid
    There's no known way to prove a three-dimensional "quantum spin liquid" exists, so Rice University physicists and their collaborators did the next best thing: They showed their single crystals of cerium zirconium pyrochlore had the right stuff to qualify as the first possible 3-D version of the long-sought state of matter. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-07-15
  • Producing Graphene from Carbon Dioxide
    Direct Synthesis of Technological Material Graphene from Greenhouse Gas Carbon Dioxide The general public knows the chemical compound of carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and because of its global-warming effect. However, carbon dioxide can also be a useful raw material for chemical reactions. A working group at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has now reported on this unusual application in the ChemSusChem journal. They are using carbon dioxide as a raw material to produce graphene, a technological material which is currently the subject of intense study. Carbon dioxide (red-black) and hydrogen (gray) catalytically react to graphene (black) on copper-palladium surfaces. (Picture: E. Moreno-Pineda, KIT) The combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil produces energy ... READ MORE
    Source: Green-RevolutionPublished on 2019-07-15By research/ media organizations
  • Introducing a new game: Quantum TiqTaqToe
    A passing conversation with my supervisor Video games have been a part of my life for about as long as I can remember. From Paperboy and The Last Ninja on the Commodore 64 when I was barely old enough to operate a keyboard, to Mario Kart 8 and Zelda on the Nintendo Switch, as a postdoc at Caltech, working on quantum computing and condensed matter physics. Up until recently, I have kept my two lives separate: my love of video games and my career in quantum physics. The realization that I could combine quantum physics with games came during an entertaining discussion with my current supervisor, Gil Refael. Gil and I were brainstorming approaches to develop a quantum version of ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum FrontiersPublished on 2019-07-15By Evert van Nieuwenburg
  • Terahertz Technology Escapes The Cold
    The group of Jérôme Faist in the Institute for Quantum Electronics achieved the first realization of a terahertz quantum cascade laser operating without cryogenic cooling. This feat heralds the widespread use of these devices in practical applications.Terahertz (THz) radiation is a bit like a treasure chest that resists being opened fully. Residing in the electromagnetic spectrum between the infrared and microwave regions, THz radiation combines a range of properties that are ideal with a view to applications. It provides a window to unique spectroscopic information about molecules and solids, it can penetrate non-conducting materials such as textiles and biological tissue, and it does so without ionising — and hence damaging — the object, or subject, under study. This opens up ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-07-15By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Quantum logic clock returns to top performance
    The quantum logic clock -- perhaps best known for showing you age faster if you stand on a stool -- has climbed back to the leading performance echelons of the world's experimental atomic clocks. ... READ MORE
    Source: Science DailyPublished on 2019-07-15
  • NUS Scientists Discover How To ‘Lock’ Heat In Place
    A ground-breaking study conducted by researchers from NUS Electrical and Computer Engineering has revealed a method of using quantum mechanical wave theories to ‘lock’ heat into a fixed position.Ordinarily, a source of heat diffuses through a conductive material until it dissipates, but Associate Professor Cheng-Wei Qiu and his team used the principle of ‘anti-parity-time (APT) symmetry’ to show that it’s possible to confine the heat to a small region of a metal ring without it spreading over time.In the future, this newly demonstrated phenomenon could be used to control heat diffusion in sophisticated ways and optimise efficacy in systems that need cooling. The results of the study were published on 12 April 2019 in the prestigious scientific journal Science.Freezing the spread of heat“Imagine ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-07-15By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • GCS Centres Converge on Frankfurt for ISC19
    July 15, 2019 — From sponsoring students and awards, to speaking and moderating discussions, to hosting guests at its “HPC Happy Hour,” GCS and centres’ staffs were heavily involved in this year’s International Supercomputing Conference.
    Prof. Dr. Dieter Kranzlmüller, Chairman of the GCS Board of Directors and Director of LRZ, gave ISC19 attendees an update on GCS activities during his presentation, “HPC in Germany—an Update from GCS.” Image courtesy of Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS).As Germany’s flagship high-performance computing (HPC) organization, the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS) has been a major participant in the International Supercomputing Conference (ISC) for the past 8 years, sending experts to share HPC knowledge and insights, present papers, as well as supporting next-generation ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-07-15By Mariana Iriarte
  • Physicists find first possible 3D quantum spin liquid
    There?s no known way to prove a three-dimensional ?quantum spin liquid? exists, so physicists did the next best thing: They showed their single crystals of cerium zirconium pyrochlore had the right stuff to qualify as the first possible 3D version of the long-sought state of matter. ... READ MORE
    Source: NanowerkPublished on 2019-07-15
  • Single-shot energetic-based estimator for entanglement in a half-parity measurement setup
    Quantum 3, 166 (2019).https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2019-07-15-166Producing and certifying entanglement between distant qubits is a highly desirable skill for quantum information technologies. Here we propose a new strategy to monitor and characterize entanglement genesis in a half parity measurement setup, that relies on the continuous readout of an energetic observable which is the half-parity observable itself. Based on a quantum-trajectory approach, we theoretically analyze the statistics of energetic fluctuations for a pair of continuously monitored qubits. We quantitatively relate these energetic fluctuations to the rate of entanglement produced between the qubits, and build an energetic-based estimator to assess the presence of entanglement in the circuit. Remarkably, this estimator is valid at the single-trajectory level and shows to be robust against finite detection efficiency. ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-07-15By Cyril Elouard, Alexia Auffèves, and Géraldine Haack
  • Minimal energy cost of entanglement extraction
    Quantum 3, 165 (2019).https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2019-07-15-165We compute the minimal energy cost for extracting entanglement from the ground state of a bosonic or fermionic quadratic system. Specifically, we find the minimal energy increase in the system resulting from replacing an entangled pair of modes, sharing entanglement entropy $Delta S$, by a product state, and we show how to construct modes achieving this minimal energy cost. Thus, we obtain a protocol independent lower bound on the extraction of pure state entanglement from quadratic systems. Due to their generality, our results apply to a large range of physical systems, as we discuss with examples.Minimal energy cost of entanglement extractionLucas Hackl1,2 and Robert H. Jonsson31Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, 85748 Garching, Germany2Munich Center ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-07-15By Lucas Hackl and Robert H. Jonsson
  • ISC19 Cluster Competition: Application Results, Finally!
    Our exhaustive coverage of the ISC19 Student Cluster Competition continues as we discuss the application scores below. While the scores were typically high, some of the apps, like SWIFT and OpenFOAM, really pushed the students to the edge, judging by the average and median scores. Here are the final results for the HPC application portion of the competition: CP2K:  This is a quantum chemistry and solid state physics application that can perform atomistic simulations of solids, liquid, molecular, periodic, material, crystal, and biological systems. You want to use Gaussian or plane wave approaches? Go for it. CP2K is like a Swiss Army knife of figuring out the physics behind materials and stuff. Taiwan’s NTHU nailed the top score, with ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-07-15By Dan Olds
  • ${l}_{1}$-norm coherence of assistance
    Author(s): Ming-Jing Zhao, Teng Ma, Quan Quan, Heng Fan, and Rajesh PereiraWe introduce and study the l1-norm coherence of assistance both theoretically and operationally. We first provide an upper bound for the l1-norm coherence of assistance and show a necessary and sufficient condition for the saturation of the upper bound. For two- and three-dimensional quantum states,...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 012315] Published Mon Jul 15, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-07-15By Ming-Jing Zhao, Teng Ma, Quan Quan, Heng Fan, and Rajesh Pereira
  • Device-independent quantum secret sharing in arbitrary even dimensions
    Author(s): Sarbani Roy and Sourav MukhopadhyayWe present a device-independent quantum secret sharing scheme in arbitrary even dimension. We propose a d-dimensional N-partite linear game, utilizing a generic multipartite higher-dimensional Bell inequality, a generalization of Mermin's inequality in a higher dimension. The probability of winning ...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 012319] Published Mon Jul 15, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-07-15By Sarbani Roy and Sourav Mukhopadhyay
  • Engineering asymmetric steady-state Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering in macroscopic hybrid systems
    Author(s): Xinyao Huang, Emil Zeuthen, Qihuang Gong, and Qiongyi HeGeneration of quantum correlations between separate objects is of significance both in fundamental physics and in quantum networks. One important challenge is to create the directional “spooky action-at-a-distance” effects that Schrödinger called “steering” between two macroscopic and massive object...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 012318] Published Mon Jul 15, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-07-15By Xinyao Huang, Emil Zeuthen, Qihuang Gong, and Qiongyi He
  • Simulations of subatomic many-body physics on a quantum frequency processor
    Author(s): Hsuan-Hao Lu, Natalie Klco, Joseph M. Lukens, Titus D. Morris, Aaina Bansal, Andreas Ekström, Gaute Hagen, Thomas Papenbrock, Andrew M. Weiner, Martin J. Savage, and Pavel LougovskiSimulating complex many-body quantum phenomena is a major scientific impetus behind the development of quantum computing, and a range of technologies are being explored to address such systems. We present the results of the largest photonics-based simulation to date, applied in the context of subato...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 012320] Published Mon Jul 15, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-07-15By Hsuan-Hao Lu, Natalie Klco, Joseph M. Lukens, Titus D. Morris, Aaina Bansal, Andreas Ekström, Gaute Hagen, Thomas Papenbrock, Andrew M. Weiner, Martin J. Savage, and Pavel Lougovski
  • Quantum hacking of free-space continuous-variable quantum key distribution by using a machine-learning technique
    Author(s): Wenti Huang, Yiyu Mao, Cailang Xie, and Duan HuangThe transmission coefficient of the free-space channel is fluctuating due to the occurrence of random fluctuations of the refractive index and noise. The Gaussian-modulated quantum states of light may degrade into a non-Gaussian mixture at a certain probability after being transmitted through the fr...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 012316] Published Mon Jul 15, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-07-15By Wenti Huang, Yiyu Mao, Cailang Xie, and Duan Huang
  • Continuous-variable entangled states of light carrying orbital angular momentum
    Author(s): A. Pecoraro, F. Cardano, L. Marrucci, and A. PorzioThe orbital angular momentum of light, unlike spin, is an infinite-dimensional discrete variable and may hence offer enhanced performances for encoding, transmitting, and processing quantum information. Hitherto, this degree of freedom of light has been studied mainly in the context of quantum state...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 012321] Published Mon Jul 15, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-07-15By A. Pecoraro, F. Cardano, L. Marrucci, and A. Porzio
  • AI: the energy industry’s untapped resource
    The arrival of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) has led to the collection and transmission of vast amounts of new and complex data, in the energy sector just as elsewhere. However, this huge inflow of data, gathered via connected devices such as sensors placed along pipelines in oil and gas fields and power plants, needs to be processed, analysed and interpreted if it is to be useful. A handful of oil majors have turned to cloud computing at their in-house data centres to take on the challenge. BP’s state-of-the-art Centre for High-Performance Computing (CHPC) in Houston, for example, is capable of over 11.2 petaflops of processing speed, while the Eni Green Data Centre near Milan now has a computational peak ... READ MORE
    Source: Engineering & TechnologyPublished on 2019-07-15By Nicholas Newman
  • Manufacturing Bits: July 15
    Atomtronics The Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser of the Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (IESL-FORTH) and others have developed an atomtronic accelerator ring, a move that could advance the field of atomtronics. Researchers have developed a small accelerator ring-shaped matterwave guide, which is capable of accelerating sub-atomic particles at hypersonic speeds. It could one day enable the development of sensitive quantum rotation and gravity sensors. The Cretan Matter Waves Group are also part of the research group. Atomtronics, a sub-field of ultracold atomic physics, manipulates atoms to create devices using lasers. This is much the same way that electronics manipulates electrons to make devices. Atomtronics promises to one day develop analogs of electronic circuits and devices using ... READ MORE
    Source: Semiconductor EngineeringPublished on 2019-07-15By Mark LaPedus
  • System Bits: July 15
    Automating bridge inspections with robotics The University of Waterloo has come up with robotics that could be used in automated inspection of bridges, making sure such critical infrastructure is safe and sound. The technology promises to make bridge inspection cheaper and easier. The system collects data for defect detection and analysis through a combination of autonomous robots, cameras, and LiDAR technology, which is incorporated in self-driving cars and in other applications, such as mapping. “We can do more than humans now do – and do it much better in every way,” said Sriram Narasimhan, an engineering professor at Waterloo. “It is very inexpensive because you don’t need as many inspectors relying on specialized equipment, such as lifts, and you get ... READ MORE
    Source: Semiconductor EngineeringPublished on 2019-07-15By Jeff Dorsch
  • NIST’s quantum logic clock returns to top performance
    (National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) The quantum logic clock -- perhaps best known for showing you age faster if you stand on a stool -- has climbed back to the leading performance echelons of the world's experimental atomic clocks. ... READ MORE
    Source: EurekAlert! NanotechnologyPublished on 2019-07-15
  • NIST’s Quantum Logic Clock Returns to Top Performance
    The quantum logic clock—perhaps best known for showing you age faster if you stand on a stool—has climbed back to the leading performance echelons of the world’s experimental atomic clocks.  ... READ MORE
    Source: NIST PhysicsPublished on 2019-07-14By Sarah Henderson
  • Path to Million Qubit Quantum Computers Using Atoms and Lasers
    Atom Computing is building quantum computers using individually controlled atoms As one of the world’s leading researchers in atomic clocks and neutral atoms, Benjamin Bloom (co-founder of Atom Computing) built the world’s fastest atomic clock, and it is considered the most precise and accurate measurement ever performed. Ben has shown that neutral atoms could be more scalable, and could build a stable solution to create and maintain controlled quantum states. He used his expertise to lead efforts at Intel on their 10nm semiconductor chip, and then to lead research and development of the first cloud-accessible quantum computer at Rigetti. He was joined by co-founder and lead scientist Jonathan King (Ph.D., ChemE, 2012) to create Atom Computing to build truly ... READ MORE
    Source: Green-RevolutionPublished on 2019-07-14By research/ media organizations
  • Scientists unveil the first-ever image of quantum entanglement
    For the first time ever, physicists have managed to take a photo of a strong form of quantum entanglement called Bell entanglement—capturing visual evidence of an elusive phenomenon which a baffled Albert Einstein once called 'spooky action at a distance'. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-07-13
  • Quantum Sensor Breakthrough Using Naturally Occurring Vibrations in Artificial Atoms
    When individual atoms emit light, they do so in discrete packets called photons.When this light is measured, this discrete or ‘granular’ nature leads to especially low fluctuations in its brightness, as two or more photons are never emitted at the same time.This property is particularly useful in developing future quantum technologies, where low fluctuations are key, and has led to a surge of interest in engineered systems that act like atoms when they emit light, but whose properties are more easily tailored.These ‘artificial atoms’ as they are known, are typically made from solid materials, and are in fact much larger objects, in which the presence of vibrations is unavoidable, and usually considered to be detrimental.However, a collaborative team, led by ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-07-12By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • On-Demand Control of Terahertz and Infrared Waves
    The ability to control infrared and terahertz waves using magnetic or electric fields is one of the great challenges in physics that could revolutionise opto-electronics, telecommunications and medical diagnostics. A theory from 2006 predicts that it should be possible to use graphene – a monoatomic layer of carbon atoms– in a magnetic field not only to absorb terahertz and infrared light on demand but also to control the direction of the circular polarisation. Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, and the University of Manchester have succeeded in testing this theory and achieved the predicted results. The study, to be published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, shows that the scientists found an efficient way to control infrared and terahertz waves. ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-07-12By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • First the E-Bike, Next the Flying Car
    This company thinks its 3D-printing technology for carbon fiber can do anythingCarbon fiber composites are incredibly strong for their weight; that’s why they’re key to the newest aircraft designs. However, they’re only strong in one direction, so they’re generally layered or woven in grid patterns before being shaped into structures. That means one set of fibers carries the load some of the time, and another set carries it at other times—which is not the most efficient use of the material. In 2014, Hemant Bheda was CEO of Quantum Polymers, a company that makes extruded plastic rods, plates, and other shapes for machined parts. The company used chopped up carbon fiber in some of its materials, but a potential customer asked for ... READ MORE
    Source: IEEE Spectrum ComputingPublished on 2019-07-12By Tekla S. Perry
  • New Theory Aims to Advance Quantum Computing
    A protocol for storing and releasing a single photon in an embedded eigenstate — a quantum state that is virtually unaffected by loss and decoherence — could advance the development of quantum computers. Created by researchers at City University of New York (CUNY), the protocol could facilitate a new approach to capturing and preserving photons. The team’s calculations suggest that it is possible for a pair of photons to impinge on a cavity-atom coupled system, and that atomic nonlinearity would allow one photon to be perfectly trapped and preserved in the system while the other is reemitted. The researchers theoretically explored the excitation and release of single-photon embedded eigenstates based on atomic ... READ MORE
    Source: PhotonicsPublished on 2019-07-12
  • Argonne Combines Quantum and Classical Approaches to Overcome Limitations in Current Quantum Computing Hardware
    July 12, 2019 — In recent years, quantum devices have become available that enable researchers — for the first time — to use real quantum hardware to begin to solve scientific problems. However, in the near term, the number and quality of qubits (the basic unit of quantum information) for quantum computers are expected to remain limited, making it difficult to use these machines for practical applications. A hybrid quantum and classical approach may be the answer to tackling this problem with existing quantum hardware. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, along with researchers at Clemson University and Fujitsu Laboratories of America, have developed hybrid algorithms to ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-07-12By Mariana Iriarte
  • Big Screen: Are space ships really possible?
    Any space adventure that goes beyond the Moon or Mars inevitably trips up when it comes to the practicalities of travel. Quite often the most satisfactory explanations are those which don’t really mean anything. For ‘Star Trek’, dilithium crystals just did the job and without further examination we were motoring along at warp factor 2. Recently at Big Screen we looked at ‘High Life’ and ‘IO’, both of which required interstellar travel although, in fairness, neither was looking too far beyond our galactic neighbours. In practice, travel to the nearest star (other than the Sun), Alpha Centauri cluster, within a single lifetime might remain beyond us unless there is a dramatic breakthrough in technology. Even with the invention of a ... READ MORE
    Source: Engineering & TechnologyPublished on 2019-07-12By Tim Fryer and Chris Edwards
  • Nonadaptive fault-tolerant verification of quantum supremacy with noise
    Quantum 3, 164 (2019).https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2019-07-12-164Quantum samplers are believed capable of sampling efficiently from distributions that are classically hard to sample from. We consider a sampler inspired by the classical Ising model. It is nonadaptive and therefore experimentally amenable. Under a plausible conjecture, classical sampling upto additive errors from this model is known to be hard. We present a trap-based verification scheme for quantum supremacy that only requires the verifier to prepare single-qubit states. The verification is done on the same model as the original sampler, a square lattice, with only a constant overhead. We next revamp our verification scheme in two distinct ways using fault tolerance that preserves the nonadaptivity. The first has a lower overhead based on error correction with ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-07-12By Theodoros Kapourniotis and Animesh Datta
  • Which is the perfect quantum theory?
    For some phenomena in quantum many-body physics several competing theories exist. But which of them describes a quantum phenomenon best? A team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Harvard University in the United States has now successfully deployed artificial neural networks for image analysis of quantum systems.read more ... READ MORE
    Source: PressReleasePointPublished on 2019-07-12By Technical University of Munich
  • Hamiltonian Simulation by Qubitization
    Quantum 3, 163 (2019).https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2019-07-12-163We present the problem of approximating the time-evolution operator $e^{-ihat{H}t}$ to error $epsilon$, where the Hamiltonian $hat{H}=(langle G|otimeshat{mathcal{I}})hat{U}(|Grangleotimeshat{mathcal{I}})$ is the projection of a unitary oracle $hat{U}$ onto the state $|Grangle$ created by another unitary oracle. Our algorithm solves this with a query complexity $mathcal{O}big(t+log({1/epsilon})big)$ to both oracles that is optimal with respect to all parameters in both the asymptotic and non-asymptotic regime, and also with low overhead, using at most two additional ancilla qubits. This approach to Hamiltonian simulation subsumes important prior art considering Hamiltonians which are $d$-sparse or a linear combination of unitaries, leading to significant improvements in space and gate complexity, such as a quadratic speed-up for precision simulations. It also motivates useful new instances, ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-07-11By Guang Hao Low and Isaac L. Chuang
  • What’s New in HPC Research: Traffic Simulation, Performance Variations, Scheduling & More
    In this bimonthly feature, HPCwire highlights newly published research in the high-performance computing community and related domains. From parallel programming to exascale to quantum computing, the details are here. Optimizing visualization performance on power-constrained supercomputers Power consumption is a major hurdle on the road the exascale. In this dissertation, Stephanie Labasan of the University of Oregon focuses on power consumption by visualization and analysis applications, which tend to be more data-intensive than traditional HPC applications. She examines power/performance tradeoffs for popular algorithms under different configurations, demonstrating that additional performance can  be gained by redistributing power based on predicted performance. Author: Stephanie Alyssa Labasan Enabling HPC-as-a-Service using ‘HEAppE’ HPC-as-a-service allows users to access supercomputing power in a simple and intuitive way without purchasing ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-07-11By Oliver Peckham
  • Optimizing the Growth of Coatings on Nanowire Catalysts
    Solar energy harvested by semiconductors—materials whose electrical resistance is in between that of regular metals and insulators—can trigger surface electrochemical reactions to generate clean and sustainable fuels such as hydrogen. Highly stable and active catalysts are needed to accelerate these reactions, especially to split water molecules into oxygen and hydrogen. Scientists have identified several strong light-absorbing semiconductors as potential catalysts; however, because of photocorrosion, many of these catalysts lose their activity for the water-splitting reaction. Light-induced corrosion, or photocorrosion, occurs when the catalyst itself undergoes chemical reactions (oxidation or reduction) via charge carriers (electrons and “holes,” or missing electrons) generated by light excitation. This degradation limits catalytic activity.Now, scientists from the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-07-11By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Of Art and Satellites
    A quotation from The Golden Record 2.0 — a play written for the NUS Arts Festival — and a high-tech quantum device from the NUS Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT) are now orbiting in space together. They are being carried by a satellite called SpooQy-1 built by CQT to test a quantum light source that could enable future secure communication. This space mission commemorates three years of art-science collaboration between CQT and the NUS Centre For the Arts (CFA).“Scientists and artists have in common that they are curious explorers of the world. Through our collaborations, we hope to inspire more people to share our appetite for learning. Even people who think they aren’t interested in science may find they appreciate its value when they encounter it through ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-07-11By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Open Source Release Welcomes Developers to Contribute and Help Solve Planet-Scale Challenges
    At Microsoft, our Quantum mission is to develop and deploy the worlds most scalable, secure, quantum computing system and to support a rich ecosystem of domain experts, developers, and researchers to solve todays most challenging problems.To help achieve this mission we introduced the Microsoft Quantum Development Kit (QDK) over two years ago. The QDK includes the Q# quantum programming language and compiler, samples and tutorials to get started, and simulators and resource estimators for your quantum programs. The QDK also includes development environment extensions for VS and VS Code, and integration with the Jupyter platform. It has been exciting to see the deep community engagement with our QDK and to witness the apps that are being built to help realize ... READ MORE
    Source: Microsoft QuantumPublished on 2019-07-11By Microsoft Quantum Team
  • LaTeX template updated, Quantum Plots, LyX layout, and more…
    We are pleased to announce that version 5.0 of the quantumarticle LaTeX document class has been released and now ships with the following new features: New class options & improvements Version 5.0 of the quantumarticle document class comes with a large number of under-the-hood improvements, fixes for several typesetting glitches, and even more thorough checks and helpful error messages to make producing professional looking manuscripts even easier. We have also further increased the compatibility with other popular document classes, and introduced new class options for using quantumarticle for manuscripts not intended for submission to Quantum. Quantum Plots As a further service to our authors, Quantum provides Quantum Plots, a Jupyter notebook based on the popular library matplotlib. It allows ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-07-11By Quantum Journal
  • Introducing Quantum Plots
    Plots are an integral part of almost every publication. But designing a plot is usually only the first step. It has also be adjusted to fit into your publication in terms of size, style and font. Of course, one can always use Tikz to produce plots that integrate well with LaTeX documents, but most authors either find this too complex or still want to use their favourite plotting tools. To this end, Quantum provides Quantum Plots, a Jupyter notebook based on the popular and widely used library matplotlib. It is intended as a tool to streamline the process of making publication-ready plots intended for submission to Quantum. The notebook will automatically set plot options and font sizes in a way ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-07-11By Quantum Journal
  • CMU Scientists Use XSEDE-Allocated Resources to Simulate Improved Battery Components
    July 11, 2019 — The move toward cleaner, cheaper energy would be much easier if we had more powerful, safer battery technologies. Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) scientists have used the XSEDE-allocated Bridges system at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) and Comet at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) to simulate new battery component materials that are inherently safer and more powerful than currently possible.
    One of the predicted new low cobalt structures of Li Nix Mn y Co 1-x-y O2 with a ratio of nickel to maganese to cobalt of 18:5:1. The nickel is shown in grey, the maganese in magenta and the cobalt in blue. The lithium layer is shown in green and oxygen in red. Image courtesy ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-07-11By Mariana Iriarte
  • The best of both worlds: How to solve real problems on modern quantum computers
    Researchers have developed hybrid algorithms to run on size-limited quantum machines and have demonstrated them for practical applications. ... READ MORE
    Source: Science DailyPublished on 2019-07-11
  • A connection between quantum correlations and spacetime geometry
    Researchers of the Academy explore the consequences of locality for measurements distributed in spacetime. Their article has now been published in the Nature journal Quantum Information. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-07-11
  • ‘Connects the Dots’ for Quantum Networks
    Researchers at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) developed a new technique that could enable future advancements in quantum technology.The technique squeezes quantum dots, tiny particles made of thousands of atoms, to emit single photons (individual particles of light) with precisely the same color and with positions that can be less than a millionth of a meter apart.“This breakthrough could accelerate the development of quantum information technologies and brain-inspired computing,” said Allan Bracker, a chemist at NRL and one of the researchers on the project.In order for quantum dots to “communicate” (interact), they have to emit light at the same wavelength. The size of a quantum dot determines this emission wavelength. However, just as no two snowflakes are alike, no ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-07-11By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • The best of both worlds: how to solve real problems on modern quantum computers
    In recent years, quantum devices have become available that enable researchers — for the first time — to use real quantum hardware to begin to solve scientific problems. However, in the near term, the number and quality of qubits (the basic unit of quantum information) for quantum computers are expected to remain limited, making it difficult to use these machines for practical applications. A hybrid quantum and classical approach may be the answer to tackling this problem with existing quantum hardware. Read More ... READ MORE
    Source: Chicago Quantum ExchangePublished on 2019-07-11By kwaimey
  • Researchers Discover Semiconducting Nanotubes That Form Spontaneously
    EPFL researchers have discovered a way of making semiconducting, photoluminescent nanotubes form spontaneously in liquid solutions. The tubes, which consist of several walls that are perfectly uniform and just a few atoms thick, display optical properties that make them perfect for use as fluorophores or photocatalysts.If scientists could find a way to control the process for making semiconductor components on a nanometric scale, they could give those components unique electronic and optical properties – opening the door to a host of useful applications.Researchers at the Laboratory of Microsystems, in EPFL’s School of Engineering, have taken an important step towards that goal with their discovery of semiconducting nanotubes that assemble automatically in solutions of metallic nanocrystals and certain ligands. The tubes have ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-07-11By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Predicting Material Properties with Quantum Monte Carlo
    July 11, 2019 — Recent advances in quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods have the potential to revolutionize computational materials science, a discipline traditionally driven by density functional theory (DFT). While DFT—an approach that uses quantum-mechanical modeling to examine the electronic structure of complex systems—provides convenience to its practitioners and has unquestionably yielded a great many successes throughout the decades since its formulation, it is not without shortcomings, which have placed a ceiling on the possibilities of materials discovery. QMC is poised to break this ceiling. The key challenge is to solve the quantum many-body problem accurately and reliably enough for a given material. QMC solves these problems via stochastic sampling—that is, by using random numbers to sample all possible solutions. ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-07-11By Mariana Iriarte
  • Quantum Chemistry on Quantum Computers
    Quantum computing and quantum information processing technology have attracted attention in recently emerging fields. Among many important and fundamental issues in nowadays science, solving Schroedinger Equation (SE) of atoms and molecules is one of the ultimate goals in chemistry, physics and their related fields. SE is “First Principle” of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, whose solutions termed wave functions can afford any information of electrons within atoms and molecules, predicting their physicochemical properties and chemical reactions.Researchers from Osaka City University (OCU) in Japan, Dr. K. Sugisaki, Profs. K. Sato and T. Takui and coworkers have found a novel quantum algorithm enabling us to determine whether quantum chemical calculations performed on quantum computers give correct wave functions as exact solutions of SE in ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-07-11By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Rigetti Computing buys quantum application developer QxBranch
    Quantum computing platform company Rigetti Computing Inc. is expanding into application territory with the acquisition of a startup called QxBranch Inc. Rigetti has built what it calls a “hybrid quantum-classical” computing platform that it claims is one of the world’s first genuine, working quantum computers. Available to use by researchers and organizations as a cloud service, […] The post Rigetti Computing buys quantum application developer QxBranch appeared first on SiliconANGLE. ... READ MORE
    Source: siliconANGLEPublished on 2019-07-11By Mike Wheatley
  • Quantum Start-up Rigetti Acquires QxBranch; Bolsters App Dev Capability
    Quantum startup Rigetti Computing announced today it acquired QxBranch, a quantum computing and data analytics software startup. The latest move marks what has been a busy year for Rigetti. Roughly one year ago, it announced plans to build a 128-bit quantum processor – the current version, Aspen4, is 16 qubits. Last fall, Rigetti launched its cloud platform and announced a $1 million prize for the first user to demonstrate quantum advantage. Rigetti says the QxBranch acquisition is a natural addition to its “full stack” strategy (hardware, development tools, cloud delivery, applications). QxBranch focuses on developing predictive analytics tools and applications for quantum computing. QxBranch’s quantum feature detector (QFD) library, written in Python, is already part of Rigetti’s tool suite. In April, ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-07-11By John Russell
  • Quantum computing firm Rigetti acquires QxBranch
    ​Quantum computing hardware and cloud company Rigetti has acquired QxBranch, an Adeleide-born quantum software startup. ... READ MORE
    Source: COMPUTERWORLD AustraliaPublished on 2019-07-11By George Nott
  • Coupling qubits to sound in a multimode cavity
    In a recent study, researchers at the University of Colorado have resolved phonon Fock states in the spectrum of a superconducting qubit coupled to a multimode acoustic cavity. Fock states (or number states) are quantum states with a clearly defined number of particles. These states play a crucial part in the second quantization formulation of quantum mechanics. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-07-11
  • Rigetti Computing acquires QxBranch for Quantum-powered Analytics
    Today Rigetti Computing announced it has acquired QxBranch, a quantum computing and data analytics software startup. "Our mission is to deliver the power of quantum computing to our customers and help them solve difficult and valuable problems,” said Chad Rigetti, founder and C.E.O. of Rigetti Computing. “We believe we have the leading hardware platform, and QxBranch is the leader at the application layer. Together we can shorten the timeline to quantum advantage and open up new opportunities for our customers.” The post Rigetti Computing acquires QxBranch for Quantum-powered Analytics appeared first on insideHPC. ... READ MORE
    Source: Inside High Performance ComputingPublished on 2019-07-11By staff
  • Squeezing Quantum Dots to Tune Their Wavelength, Allow Interaction
    A technique for squeezing quantum dots, developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), could enable many quantum dots to interact with each other in a quantum network. The new technique provides a way to realize quantum dots that are tuned precisely in both their wavelength and position. The size of a quantum dot determines its emission wavelength, but no two quantum dots have exactly the same size and shape when they are created. To enable quantum dots to emit single photons with the same wavelength, and positioned less than 1 millionth of a meter apart, the researchers patterned strain using local phase transitions to selectively tune individual quantum dots that were embedded in a photonic architecture. The patterning ... READ MORE
    Source: PhotonicsPublished on 2019-07-11
  • Government announces 23.5m for UK Quantum Technology Hub
    A new wave of funding has been announced by the Government for research into quantum technologies. The Treasury has today committed £94 million to the National Quantum Technologies Programme, which comprises four Quantum Technology Hubs across the UK.read more ... READ MORE
    Source: PressReleasePointPublished on 2019-07-11By University of Birmingham
  • Discerning quantum memories based on electromagnetically-induced-transparency and Autler-Townes-splitting protocols
    Author(s): Anindya Rastogi, Erhan Saglamyurek, Taras Hrushevskyi, Scott Hubele, and Lindsay J. LeBlancElectromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and Autler-Townes splitting (ATS) are similar, but different quantum optical phenomena: EIT results from a Fano interference, whereas ATS is described by the ac Stark effect. Likewise, despite their close resemblance, light-storage techniques based on t...[Phys. Rev. A 100, 012314] Published Thu Jul 11, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-07-11By Anindya Rastogi, Erhan Saglamyurek, Taras Hrushevskyi, Scott Hubele, and Lindsay J. LeBlanc
  • Hyperbolic lattice appears in a coplanar waveguide array
    Building on previous work that realized Euclidean lattice models using circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) and interconnected networks of superconducting microwave resonators, researchers at Princeton University and the University of Maryland have now made a coplanar waveguide array in which photons move as if they are in hyperbolic, negatively-curved, space. Euclidean geometry describes the flat space of the non-relativistic physics world. It can describe Newtonian gravity, but it fails to describe gravitational radiation or strong gravitational fields that require general relativity in which gravity appears as a curvature of space-time. Non-Euclidean geometry is obviously difficult to study because of the, literally, astronomical distances involved so physicists are trying to reproduce it in experiments in the laboratory. The most intuitive way to ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-07-11By Belle Dumé
  • Approximation Algorithms for Complex-Valued Ising Models on Bounded Degree Graphs
    Quantum 3, 162 (2019).https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2019-07-11-162We study the problem of approximating the Ising model partition function with complex parameters on bounded degree graphs. We establish a deterministic polynomial-time approximation scheme for the partition function when the interactions and external fields are absolutely bounded close to zero. Furthermore, we prove that for this class of Ising models the partition function does not vanish. Our algorithm is based on an approach due to Barvinok for approximating evaluations of a polynomial based on the location of the complex zeros and a technique due to Patel and Regts for efficiently computing the leading coefficients of graph polynomials on bounded degree graphs. Finally, we show how our algorithm can be extended to approximate certain output probability amplitudes ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-07-11By Ryan L. Mann and Michael J. Bremner
  • Scientists discover how to ‘lock’ heat in place using quantum mechanics
    A ground-breaking study conducted by researchers from NUS Electrical and Computer Engineering has revealed a method of using quantum mechanical wave theories to ‘lock’ heat into a fixed position. Ordinarily, a source of heat diffuses through a conductive material until it dissipates, but Associate Professor Cheng-Wei Qiu and his team used the principle of ‘anti-parity-time (APT) symmetry’ to show that it’s possible to confine the heat to a small region of a metal ring without it spreading over time. Rotated at 0.5 rpm, the experimental system on the left shows the hottest (white) part of the ring is fixed at the bottom as it moves. The reference on the right shows the hottest part of the ring moving in conjunction with ... READ MORE
    Source: Green-RevolutionPublished on 2019-07-11By research/ media organizations
  • Air Force, IBM Form Quantum Computing Research Partnership
    The Air Force Research Laboratory has collaborated with IBM (NYSE: IBM) to explore the potential applications of commercial quantum technology to U.S. Air Force operations. AFRL said Tuesday it will work with the company's researchers to examine optimization challenges, quantum chemistry simulation and machine learning algorithms on actual hardware through the IBM Q Network. ... READ MORE
    Source: GOVCONWirePublished on 2019-07-11By Matthew Nelson
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