Latest Quantum Computing Reports

Latest Quantum Computing Reports.  You’ll find the latest news from our most reliable sources, here.  The news, uncategorized, awaiting our review.   Get it first.   Because Quantum is Coming.  Qubit.

  • For Specialized Optimizing Machines, It’s All in the Connections
    Whether it’s an Ising machine or a quantum annealer, the machine seems to matter less than how the parts connect ... READ MORE
    Source: IEEE Spectrum AllPublished on 2019-05-24By Michael Koziol
  • Scientists Discover Circuit Boards Inside Cells
    Unlike a fixed circuit board, however, cells can rapidly rewire their communication networks to change their behaviour.Cell-wide webThe discovery of this cell-wide web turns our understanding of how instructions spread around a cell on its head.It was thought that the various organs and structures inside a cell float around in an open sea called the cytoplasm.Signals that tell the cell what to do were thought to be transmitted in waves and the frequency of the waves was the crucial part of the message.NanoscaleResearchers at the University of Edinburgh found information is carried across a web of guide wires that transmit signals across tiny, nanoscale distances.It is the movement of charged molecules across these tiny distances that transmit information, just as ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-05-24By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Quantum Computing Boost from Vapour Stabilising Technique
    A technique to stabilise alkali metal vapour density using gold nanoparticles, so electrons can be accessed for applications including quantum computing, atom cooling and precision measurements, has been patented by scientists at the University of Bath.Alkali metal vapours, including lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium, allow scientists to access individual electrons, due to the presence of a single electron in the outer ‘shell’ of alkali metals.This has great potential for a range of applications, including logic operations, storage and sensing in quantum computing, as well as in ultra-precise time measurements with atomic clocks, or in medical diagnostics including cardiograms and encephalograms.However, a serious technical obstacle has been reliably controlling the pressure of the vapour within an enclosed space, for instance ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-05-24By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Atom patterning breaks new number record
    Neutral atoms trapped by light in arrays of dipole traps could be used as quantum bits for quantum computing. For such applications, however, these atoms must be positioned individually within the traps to create defect-free arrays that can then be used in information processing. Researchers at the Technische Universität Darmstadt in Germany have now developed a new technique for patterning 111 atoms in this way, so breaking the previous record, set last year, of 72 atoms. The method should even be scalable to one million atoms or more, they say. In their experiments, the researchers, led by Gerhard Birkl, began by creating a cloud of several million rubidium atoms in a room-temperature vacuum system using a magneto-optical trap. They then ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-05-24By Belle Dumé
  • How permanent summer time could affect your sleep, BBC sings the praises of kinetic theory
    There is a plan afoot in Europe to do away with the annual switches between standard time and summer time (or daylight-saving time, as it is known in North America). Tonight in Bristol (at about 51° latitude) the Sun will set at 9:08 pm and on the June solstice it will be daylight until 9:31 pm. I think most would agree that it would be crazy to give up these long, bright evenings – so I’m hoping that, if the UK does stop changing its clocks, it will remain on summer time all year round. The downside to being on summer time all year round is that it would not be light until 9:13 am in Bristol on December 21 ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-05-24By Hamish Johnston
  • New Material Also Reveals New Quasiparticles
    Researchers at PSI have investigated a novel crystalline material that exhibits electronic properties that have never been seen before. It is a crystal of aluminum and platinum atoms arranged in a special way. In the symmetrically repeating unit cells of this crystal, individual atoms were offset from each other in such a way that they – as connected in the mind’s eye – followed the shape of a spiral staircase. This resulted in novel properties of electronic behaviour for the crystal as a whole, including so-called Rarita-Schwinger fermions in its interior and very long and quadruple topological Fermi arcs on its surface. The researchers have now published their results in the journal Nature Physics.Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-05-24By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Video: The First Catalan Quantum Computer
    Pol Forn from the Barcelona Supercomputing Centre gave this talk at the BSC Annual Meeting. "QUANTIC is a joint venture between the Barcelona Supercomputing Center and the University of Barcelona. The research directions are focused on performing quantum computation in a laboratory of superconducting quantum circuits and studying new applications for quantum processors." The post Video: The First Catalan Quantum Computer appeared first on insideHPC. ... READ MORE
    Source: Inside High Performance ComputingPublished on 2019-05-24By Rich Brueckner
  • Fluorescence Spectroscopy Market 2018: Global Industry Overview 2028: Top Companies – Shimadzu Corporation, Sarspec, Lda, Aurora Biomed Inc.
    At present, there are various diagnostic techniques available for the diagnosis of medically important microorganisms like viruses, bacteria, parasites, and fungi. But, these techniques are time-consuming with some limitations or inconvenience. Fluorescence spectroscopy seems to be a promising emerging diagnostic technique with fast and rapid diagnosis ability which can be used in many filed of medical sciences. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a method which is used to analyze the sample fluorescence properties by determining the concentration of an analyte in a sample. Fluorescence spectroscopy is extensively used for measuring compounds in a solution and is usually considered an easy method to perform. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a kind of electromagnetic spectroscopy which examines fluorescence from a sample. In fluorescence spectroscopy, a specific ... READ MORE
    Source: ReleaseWirePublished on 2019-05-24
  • Study investigates how spin-orbit interaction protects Majorana nanowires
    Researchers at Delft University of Technology have recently carried out a study investigating spin-orbit interaction in Majorana nanowires. Their study, published in Physical Review Letters, is the first to clearly show the mechanism that enables the creation of the elusive Majorana particle, which could become the building block of a more stable type of quantum computer. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org NanotechPublished on 2019-05-24
  • New Holographic Technique Opens the Way for Quantum Computation
    Photography measures how much light of different color hits the photographic film. However, light is also a wave, and is therefore characterized by the phase. Phase specifies the position of a point within the wave cycle and correlates to depth of information, meaning that recording the phase of light scattered by an object can retrieve its full 3D shape, which cannot be obtained with a simple photograph. This is the basis of optical holography, popularized by fancy holograms in sci-fi movies like Star Wars.But the problem is that the spatial resolution of the photo/hologram is limited by the wavelength of light, around or just-below 1 μm (0.001 mm). That’s fine for macroscopic objects, but it starts to fail when entering ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-05-24By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • World’s First Ultrafast All-Optical Room Temperature Transistor
    Cover of the June issue of Nature Photonics Modern digital computers have changed our lives in a variety of ways, but the technology on which they are built has still some room for improvement. As computational workloads continue to grow due to massive amounts of data and techniques like artificial intelligence, more powerful computing technologies become of paramount importance. Two of the main pillars of our modern digital computers are the electronic transistor and the von-Neumann computer architecture. While the von-Neumann architecture established the physical separation of computing tasks like storage and processing, transistors are the fundamental building blocks in our digital computers. By cramming ever more transistors on ever smaller chips we have come to build devices like our ... READ MORE
    Source: IBM ResearchPublished on 2019-05-24By Thilo Stöferle
  • Quantum computing boost from vapor stabilizing technique
    A technique to stabilize alkali metal vapor density using gold nanoparticles, so electrons can be accessed for applications including quantum computing, atom cooling and precision measurements, has now been patented. ... READ MORE
    Source: Science DailyPublished on 2019-05-24
  • Could skyrmions change the future of computing?
    The chances are high that most people you know have never heard of skyrmions. This is natural, because they are rather murky products of quantum field theory that act like particles without actually being particles. So far so obscure. Skyrmions, however, may soon be as well known as silicon chips. That’s because they have the potential to change the face of computing, revolutionising the fields of data storage, information processing and artificial intelligence. Skyrmions are quasi-particles – little twists in energy fields that look and behave like particles. They can be moved around, interact with other skyrmions and be created and destroyed. Like particles, they can be extremely stable, lasting years in the right conditions. Based on their inherent stability, ... READ MORE
    Source: Engineering & TechnologyPublished on 2019-05-24By Lee Williams
  • Battle of the elements: What makes carbon King of the Elements?
    What links the Earth and the air? What both sparkles like starlight and reflects almost nothing at all? What underpins the chemistry of biological molecules – life itself – and has launched a whole field of materials science in 2D, not to mention its mechanical, electrical and optical properties, which are worth (to funders at least) billions? In some form or another carbon and carbon compounds take a piece of the action in almost all fields of science. So what makes carbon so ubiquitous in so many fields? A chemist might think a good place to start is by looking at how carbon bonds to other elements. As a physicist by training, though, I’d add that where it gets really ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-05-24By Anna Demming
  • Minimal nonorthogonal gate decomposition for qubits with limited control
    Author(s): Xiao-Ming Zhang, Jianan Li, Xin Wang, and Man-Hong YungIn quantum control theory, a question of fundamental and practical interest is how an arbitrary unitary transformation can be decomposed into a minimum number of elementary rotations for implementation, subject to various physical constraints. Examples include the singlet-triplet (ST) and exchange-o...[Phys. Rev. A 99, 052339] Published Fri May 24, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-05-24By Xiao-Ming Zhang, Jianan Li, Xin Wang, and Man-Hong Yung
  • Focus: A Quantum Molecular Assembler
    Author(s): Matteo RiniResearchers have created a molecule in a single, precisely characterized quantum state by merging two carefully prepared atoms.[Physics 12, 58] Published Fri May 24, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS PhysicsPublished on 2019-05-24By Matteo Rini
  • Plumbene, graphene’s latest cousin, realized on a ‘nano water cube’
    Scientists have created 'plumbene', a 2D-honeycomb sheet of lead atoms. Plumbene has the largest spin-orbit interaction of any Group 14 elemental 2D material, potentially making it a robust 2D topological insulator in which the Quantum Spin Hall Effect might occur even above room temperature. ... READ MORE
    Source: NanowerkPublished on 2019-05-24
  • Former Novetta CEO Peter LaMontagne Named to ManTech Board
    Peter LaMontagne, president and CEO of geospatial intelligence firm Quantum Spatial, has been appointed to ManTech International‘s (Nasdaq: MANT) board of directors. LaMontagne, who also worked for ManTech as senior corporate vice president, previously served as CEO of Novetta prior to 2019 Wash100 award recipient Tiffany Gates’ appointment to the role in March 2017. He … ... READ MORE
    Source: GOVCONWirePublished on 2019-05-24By Brenda Marie Rivers
  • Superfast Computing Method Uses Terahertz Light Pulses
    An international team has discovered how to perform superfast data processing using light pulses instead of electricity. The team used magnets to create faster data processing speeds without incurring high energy costs. Traditionally in magnetic hard drives, the magnetic read/write head uses electrical currents to retrieve information. Researchers from Lancaster University, Regensburg University, Radboud University, and the Russian Academy of Sciences replaced the electricity used to retrieve data with extremely short pulses of light. Each pulse is the duration of one-trillionth of a second and is concentrated by special antennas on top of a magnet. Using ultrashort pulses of light enables extremely economical switching of a magnet from one stable orientation (red arrow) to another (white arrow). This ... READ MORE
    Source: PhotonicsPublished on 2019-05-24
  • Quantum computing boost from vapour stabilising technique
    (University of Bath) A technique to stabilise alkali metal vapour density using gold nanoparticles, so electrons can be accessed for applications including quantum computing, atom cooling and precision measurements, has been patented by scientists at the University of Bath. ... READ MORE
    Source: EurekAlert! Chemistry & PhysicsPublished on 2019-05-24
  • As quantum technology matures what industries should care?
    “In the next 5-10 years a quantum computer will do a calculation that a supercomputer can’t do,” Rupesh Srivistava told around 65 invited attendees at the OxLEP led Quantum Technologies briefing at the UK’s House of Commons. No-one can predict the future, but as a Technology Associate at Oxford University’s Clarendon Laboratory working for Networked Quantum Information Technologies (NQIT) Srivistava is well placed for an educated guess, and there is increasing confidence that in the not so distant future, quantum phenomena will descend from the lofty realms of the wacky and inscrutable to be harnessed in technologies that are useful and eventually indispensable for human activities. However as to what those activities are and who should care, it seems the ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-05-23By Anna Demming
  • AIC and EXTEN Technologies to Provide NVMe-oF Storage Solutions with Ultra-High Performance
    TAIPEI, TaiwanMay 23, 2019 — AIC and EXTEN Technologies have partnered to provide a complete NVMe-oF target solution using a cost-effective FBOF platform running Broadcom PS1100R Stingray 100G SmartNIC with EXTEN HyperDynamic Software. The AIC J2024-04 platform supports twice the PCIe bandwidth of a typical 2U server, allowing quad 100GbE networking with 24 NVMe drives. EXTEN HyperDynamic storage software provides record-breaking performance with advanced management, provisioning, and RAID data protection services. “NVMe over Fabrics will reshape the datacenter landscape. It is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to be a driver in these changes. AIC is proud to be one of the leading solution providers to offer a turnkey box to the leading data centers in the world,” said Michael Liang, CEO, AIC. ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-05-23By Oliver Peckham
  • Quantum Dots Enhance Stability of Solar-Harvesting Perovskite Crystals
    U of T Engineering researchers have combined two emerging technologies for next-generation solar power — and discovered that each one helps stabilize the other. The resulting hybrid material is a major step toward reducing the cost of solar power while multiplying the ways it can be used.Today virtually all solar cells are made of high-purity silicon. It’s a well-established technology, and in recent years the manufacturing cost has dropped significantly due to economies of scale. Nevertheless, silicon has an upper limit to its efficiency. A team led by Professor Ted Sargent (ECE) is pursuing complementary materials that can enhance the solar-harvesting potential of silicon by absorbing wavelengths of light that silicon does not.“Two of the technologies we pursue in our lab are ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-05-23By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Data Science Helps Engineers Discover New Materials for Solar Cells and LEDs
    Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a high-throughput computational method to design new materials for next generation solar cells and LEDs. Their approach generated 13 new material candidates for solar cells and 23 new candidates for LEDs. Calculations predicted that these materials, called hybrid halide semiconductors, would be stable and exhibit excellent optoelectronic properties.The team published their findings on May 22, 2019 in the journal Energy & Environmental Science.Hybrid halide semiconductors are materials that consist of an inorganic framework housing organic cations. They show unique material properties that are not found in organic or inorganic materials alone.A subclass of these materials, called hybrid halide perovskites, have attracted a lot of attention as promising materials for next generation ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-05-23By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • IonQ Publishes New Benchmarks for Quantum Computation
    May 23, 2019 — IonQ, a leader in trapped-ion quantum computing, has released the results of two rigorous real-world tests that show that its quantum computer can solve significantly more complex problems with greater accuracy than results published for any other quantum computer. The results, released on arXiv.org, are further validation of IonQ’s trapped-ion technology. In December, IonQ announced the most powerful system built to date. And in February, it published the world’s first quantum computer simulation of the water molecule. “There is a lot of hype in the market now as many players release highly selective descriptions and statistics for their quantum computers,” said Christopher Monroe, IonQ’s co-founder and Chief Executive Officer. “The real test of any computer is what can ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-05-23By Oliver Peckham
  • IonQ Announces New CEO to Poise for Rapid Growth
    May 23, 2019 — IonQ, a leader in universal quantum computing, announced a change in leadership to accommodate its aggressive growth objectives for 2019 and beyond. IonQ’s current CEO and co-founder, Christopher Monroe, will be appointed Chief Scientist, and Peter Chapman will join the company as the President and Chief Executive Officer. Mr. Monroe said, “As IonQ accomplishes new technological breakthroughs in the race for quantum computing, Peter’s role as CEO is imperative to bringing those advancements to life for markets such as chemistry, medicine, finance, logistics and others that we have yet to identify.” Peter Chapman, who was recently Director of Engineering for Amazon Prime, is also a former close colleague of Ray Kurzweil, prestigious innovator, inventor and futurist. Peter ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-05-23By Oliver Peckham
  • Lithium Doesn’t Crack Under Pressure, It Transforms
    A sample of the mineral lepidolite, a key source of lithium, mined in Finland.A sample of the mineral lepidolite, a key source of lithium, mined in Finland. (Credit: iStock/ekakoskinen) Using cutting-edge theoretical calculations performed at NERSC, researchers at Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry have predicted fascinating new properties of lithium – a light alkali metal that has intrigued scientists for two decades with its remarkable diversity of physical states at high pressures. “Under standard conditions, lithium is a simple metal that forms a textbook crystalline solid. However, scientists have shown that when you put a lithium crystal under pressure, the atomic structure changes and, somewhat counterintuitively, its conductivity drops, becoming less metallic,” said Stephanie Mack, a graduate student research ... READ MORE
    Source: Lawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryPublished on 2019-05-23By akovner
  • Geometry of an electron determined for the first time
    Physicists are able to show for the first time how a single electron looks in an artificial atom. A newly developed method enables them to show the probability of an electron being present in a space. This allows improved control of electron spins, which could serve as the smallest information unit in a future quantum computer. ... READ MORE
    Source: Science DailyPublished on 2019-05-23
  • Optimal realistic attacks in continuous-variable quantum key distribution
    Author(s): Nedasadat Hosseinidehaj, Nathan Walk, and Timothy C. RalphQuantum cryptographic protocols are typically analyzed by assuming that potential opponents can carry out all physical operations, an assumption which grants capabilities far in excess of present technology. Adjusting this assumption to reflect more realistic capabilities is an attractive prospect, ...[Phys. Rev. A 99, 052336] Published Thu May 23, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-05-23By Nedasadat Hosseinidehaj, Nathan Walk, and Timothy C. Ralph
  • Digitization of scalar fields for quantum computing
    Author(s): Natalie Klco and Martin J. SavageQubit, operator, and gate resources required for the digitization of lattice λϕ4 scalar field theories onto quantum computers are considered, building upon the foundational work by Jordan et al. [Quantum Inf. Comput. 14, 1014 (2014); Science 336, 1130 (2012)], with a focus towards noisy intermediate...[Phys. Rev. A 99, 052335] Published Thu May 23, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-05-23By Natalie Klco and Martin J. Savage
  • Upper bound on certifiable randomness from a quantum black-box device
    Author(s): Marie Ioannou, Jonatan Bohr Brask, and Nicolas BrunnerQuantum theory allows for randomness generation in a device-independent setting, where no detailed description of the experimental device is required. Here we derive a general upper bound on the amount of randomness that can be certified in such a setting. Our bound applies to any black-box scenario...[Phys. Rev. A 99, 052338] Published Thu May 23, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-05-23By Marie Ioannou, Jonatan Bohr Brask, and Nicolas Brunner
  • From research to real quantum computing?
    The word “quantum” appears today in just about every article about computing and electronics. While quantum means significant and considerable, it is not just new age “mumbo-jumbo”. It underlies many of today’s most important technologies, including lasers and semiconductors found in every computer chip. More specifically, quantum computing is a new type of computing, as IBM explains it, “All computing systems rely on a fundamental ability to store and manipulate information. Current computers manipulate individual bits, which store information as binary 0 and 1 states. Quantum computers leverage quantum mechanical phenomena to manipulate information. To do this, they rely on quantum bits, or qubits.” There are a few different ways to create a qubit. One method uses superconductivity to ... READ MORE
    Source: EE EngineerITPublished on 2019-05-23By Aimee Clarke
  • Plumbene, graphene’s latest cousin, realized on the ‘nano water cube’
    (Nagoya University) Nagoya University-led researchers have created 'plumbene,' a 2D-honeycomb sheet of lead atoms. Plumbene has the largest spin-orbit interaction of any Group 14 elemental 2D material, potentially making it a robust 2D topological insulator in which the Quantum Spin Hall Effect might occur even above room temperature. As a surprising by-product, the research group also observed a nanoscale palladium-lead Weaire-Phelan-like bubble structure in the palladium substrate -- like the 'WaterCube' of the 2008 Olympics in Beijing. ... READ MORE
    Source: EurekAlert! NanotechnologyPublished on 2019-05-23
  • The geometry of an electron determined for the first time
    (University of Basel) Physicists at the University of Basel are able to show for the first time how a single electron looks in an artificial atom. A newly developed method enables them to show the probability of an electron being present in a space. This allows improved control of electron spins, which could serve as the smallest information unit in a future quantum computer. The experiments were published in Physical Review Letters and the related theory in Physical Review B. ... READ MORE
    Source: EurekAlert! NanotechnologyPublished on 2019-05-23
  • TACC Ranch Technology Upgrade Improves Valuable Data Storage
    There’s a joke attributed to comedian Steven Wright that goes, “You can’t have everything. Where would you put it?” Users of advanced computing can likely relate to this. The exponential growth of data poses a steep challenge to efforts for its reliable storage. For over 12 years, the Ranch system at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) has provided long-term archiving of research data ranging from astrophysics to climate science to particle physics, and more. A new upgrade to hardware and software brings good news to over 52,000 users of TACC’s Ranch long-term mass data storage system.
    TACC’s Ranch archival system includes a Quantum Scalar i6000 tape library with the StorNext archival file system that coordinates both disk and ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-05-22By Jorge Salazar, TACC
  • Terahertz light pulses speed up spin switching
    A new technique to rapidly reverse a magnet’s polarity in a way that all of its spins coherently rotate could be used to develop more energy-efficient data storage devices and superfast computers in the future. The technique, which works by applying ultrashort pulses of terahertz-frequency light to the magnet, does not produce any waste heat and requires very little energy – just one photon per spin flip. Modern-day computer hard drives encode data as binary zeros and ones by orienting the spins in magnetic materials using magnetic field pulses created by an electrical current. This process dissipates huge amounts of energy though (and is relatively slow). Indeed, today’s data centres consume between 2 and 5% of the world’s electricity and ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-05-22By Belle Dumé
  • Researchers Propose New Method for Detecting Magnetic Nanosamples
    A research group led by Prof. XUE Fei in High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CHMFL), recently proposed a new method for assembling magnetic nanosamples and a cantilever for dynamic cantilever magnetometry.Their work was published in Physical Review Applied.Magnetic nanostructures are elemental components in many different areas, such as high-density magnetic recording, magnetic sensors, magnetic force detection, and biomedical sciences.In these studies and applications, quantitative analysis of magnetic anisotropy, coercivity, and saturation magnetization of nanomagnetic structures is very important.The researchers in Prof. XUE’s group proposed a sample-preparation and sample-transfer method that allows dynamic cantilever magnetometry to be used to measure individual nanostructures with no particular shape requirements.They used a dual-beam system consisting of a focused ion beam and a scanning electron ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-05-22By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Quantum rebar: Quantum dots enhance stability of solar-harvesting perovskite crystals
    Researchers demonstrate that perovskite crystals and quantum dots working together can increase stability of solar materials. ... READ MORE
    Source: NanowerkPublished on 2019-05-22
  • Superconductor’s Magnetic Persona Unmasked
    In the pantheon of unconventional superconductors, iron selenide is a rock star. But new experiments by U.S., Chinese and European physicists have found the material’s magnetic persona to be unexpectedly mundane.Rice University physicist Pengcheng Dai, corresponding author of a study of the results published online this week in Nature Materials, offered this bottom-line assessment of iron selenide: “It’s a garden-variety iron-based superconductor. The fundamental physics of superconductivity are similar to what we find in all the other iron-based superconductors.”That conclusion is based on data from neutron scattering experiments performed over the past year in the U.S., Germany and the United Kingdom. The experiments produced the first measurements of the dynamic magnetic properties of iron selenide crystals that had undergone a characteristic structural shift that occurs as ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-05-22By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • ID Quantique explains why quantum specialists are racing to join ITU
    In a recent interview with ITU News, ID Quantique’s Matthieu Legré explains the reasons behind accelerating ITU standardisation work on security aspects of quantum technologies. During the expansive interview, Matthieu explains why quantum computing is a threat to security, explains why protective action must be taken now and elaborates on the importance of ITU standardisation work and how it will evolve over the coming years. The interview: Seven companies and two universities have become ITU members to influence the development of ITU standards on security aspects of quantum technologies. These new ITU members are preparing for the impending arrival of quantum computing – new computing architectures based on the properties of quantum physics. Quantum technologies will be capable of solving ... READ MORE
    Source: IDQPublished on 2019-05-22By cremarc
  • Near-term quantum-repeater experiments with nitrogen-vacancy centers: Overcoming the limitations of direct transmission
    Author(s): Filip Rozpędek, Raja Yehia, Kenneth Goodenough, Maximilian Ruf, Peter C. Humphreys, Ronald Hanson, Stephanie Wehner, and David ElkoussQuantum channels enable the implementation of communication tasks inaccessible to their classical counterparts. The most famous example is the distribution of secret key. However, in the absence of quantum repeaters, the rate at which these tasks can be performed is dictated by the losses in the qua...[Phys. Rev. A 99, 052330] Published Wed May 22, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-05-22By Filip Rozpędek, Raja Yehia, Kenneth Goodenough, Maximilian Ruf, Peter C. Humphreys, Ronald Hanson, Stephanie Wehner, and David Elkouss
  • Optimal quantum subsystem codes in two dimensions
    Author(s): Theodore J. YoderGiven any two classical codes with parameters [n1,k,d1] and [n2,k,d2], we show how to construct a quantum subsystem code in two dimensions with parameters [[N,K,D]] satisfying N≤2n1n2, K=k, and D=min(d1,d2). These quantum codes are in the class of generalized Bacon-Shor codes introduced by Bravyi [P...[Phys. Rev. A 99, 052333] Published Wed May 22, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-05-22By Theodore J. Yoder
  • Quantum-assisted Gaussian process regression
    Author(s): Zhikuan Zhao, Jack K. Fitzsimons, and Joseph F. FitzsimonsGaussian processes (GPs) are a widely used model for regression problems in supervised machine learning. Implementation of GP regression typically requires O(n3) logic gates. We show that the quantum linear systems algorithm [Harrow et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 150502 (2009)] can be applied to Gaus...[Phys. Rev. A 99, 052331] Published Wed May 22, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-05-22By Zhikuan Zhao, Jack K. Fitzsimons, and Joseph F. Fitzsimons
  • Ultrafast variational simulation of nontrivial quantum states with long-range interactions
    Author(s): Wen Wei Ho, Cheryne Jonay, and Timothy H. HsiehState preparation protocols ideally require as minimal operations as possible in order to be implemented in near-term, potentially noisy quantum devices. Motivated by long-range interactions (LRIs) intrinsic to many present-day experimental platforms (trapped ions, Rydberg atom arrays, etc.), we inv...[Phys. Rev. A 99, 052332] Published Wed May 22, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-05-22By Wen Wei Ho, Cheryne Jonay, and Timothy H. Hsieh
  • Viewpoint: 3D Map of a Quantum Dot’s Potential
    Author(s): Belita KoillerA new experimental method provides a way to determine the 3D confining potential of an electron in a quantum dot, allowing improved control over the electron’s spin.[Physics 12, 56] Published Wed May 22, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS PhysicsPublished on 2019-05-22By Belita Koiller
  • TACC Ranch technology upgrade improves valuable data storage
    (University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center) The Texas Advanced Computing Center upgraded the hardware and software to its Ranch long-term mass storage system. Quantum and Data Direct Networks supplied the hardware and software for the Ranch upgrade. Users should inspect and migrate data in a favorable sizes for the tape archives, preferably bigger than 100 gigabytes in individual file size. ... READ MORE
    Source: EurekAlert! Technology & EngineeringPublished on 2019-05-22
  • A light matter: Understanding the Raman dance of solids
    (Tokyo Institute of Technology) Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology and Keio University investigated the excitation and detection of photogenerated coherent phonons in polar semiconductor GaAs through an ultrafast dual pump-probe laser for quantum interferometry. ... READ MORE
    Source: EurekAlert! Chemistry & PhysicsPublished on 2019-05-22
  • ‘Noise-cancelling headphones’ for quantum computers: international collaboration launched
    A new project to develop an unprecedented capability in quantum computing -  a 'noise-cancelling headphone' for quantum computers - is set to increase the stability of fragile quantum building blocks, or qubits. ... READ MORE
    Source: University of New South WalesPublished on 2019-05-21
  • Lattice anchoring stabilizes solution-processed semiconductors
    Nature, Published online: 22 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1239-7The stability of both colloidal quantum dots and perovskites can be improved by combining them into a hybrid material in which matched lattice parameters suppress the formation of undesired phases. ... READ MORE
    Source: nature.comPublished on 2019-05-21By Mengxia Liu
  • JQI Researchers Shed New Light on Atomic ‘Wave Function’
    Physicists have demonstrated a new way to obtain the essential details that describe an isolated quantum system, such as a gas of atoms, through direct observation. The new method gives information about the likelihood of finding atoms at specific locations in the system with unprecedented spatial resolution. With this technique, scientists can obtain details on a scale of tens of nanometers—smaller than the width of a virus.Experiments performed at the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI), a research partnership between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland, use an optical lattice—a web of laser light that suspends thousands of individual atoms—to determine the probability that an atom might be at any given location. Because each individual atom in the ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-05-21By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • 14th Forum Teratec Highlights Major Keynote Speakers
    BRUYÈRES-LE-CHÂTEL, France, May 21, 2019 –Europe with new technologies coming at the heart of our future daily lives will be the focus of this new edition of the Forum Teratec, bringing together a panel of well-known and recognized experts providing a breadth of exchanges and content during these two days. For the first time speaking at the Plenary Sessions chaired by Daniel Verwaerde President of Teratec, this 14th edition will welcome Mariya Gabriel, European Commissioner for the Digital Economy and Society. Plenary Sessions: the meeting place for technological experts and industrial users! ·       Which Europe for HPC? Daniel Verwaerde will explain how far Teratec is a key player in supporting HPC in Europe. Mariya Gabriel, European Commissioner for the Digital Economy and Society will also present ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-05-21By Oliver Peckham
  • Why post-quantum encryption will be critical to protect current classical computers
    Quantum computers are theorized to be capable of breaking RSA encryption. Experts disagree on when it could happen, but agree on a need for quantum-proof encryption. ... READ MORE
    Source: TechRepublic ArticlesPublished on 2019-05-21
  • How Recent Technology Developments and Transformations in the Quantum Computing Space have Made an Impact on our Business Environment
    While Quantum technology is very promising, it is not at the financial breaking point to be competitive with the benefits of the traditional systems for a return on investment. ... READ MORE
    Source: CIO Review PlatformsPublished on 2019-05-21
  • Shedding Light on Quantum Computing
    Quantum computers promise to transform information technology. Perhaps only a few years from now, they will be performing tasks impossible for any classical machine, powering data science, engineering and drug design. The commercial quantum computers of the future are very likely to require very precise control of light, creating a multi-billion-dollar market for lasers and other photonic components.  This new kind of computing uses a phenomenon known as superposition, in which a... ... READ MORE
    Source: Novus LightPublished on 2019-05-21By Dr. Graeme Malcolm and Dr. Nils Hempler
  • The Short Path Algorithm Applied to a Toy Model
    Quantum 3, 145 (2019).https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2019-05-20-145We numerically investigate the performance of the short path optimization algorithm on a toy problem, with the potential chosen to depend only on the total Hamming weight to allow simulation of larger systems. We consider classes of potentials with multiple minima which cause the adiabatic algorithm to experience difficulties with small gaps. The numerical investigation allows us to consider a broader range of parameters than was studied in previous rigorous work on the short path algorithm, and to show that the algorithm can continue to lead to speedups for more general objective functions than those considered before. We find in many cases a polynomial speedup over Grover search. We present a heuristic analytic treatment of choices of ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-05-20By M. B. Hastings
  • Quantum Sensing & Single-Photon Systems News May 2019
    Welcome to the latest edition of Quantum Sensing & Single-Photon Systems News; brought to you by IDQ, the world leader in quantum photonics. In this edition, we would like to invite you to join us in Munich for Laser World of Photonics 2019. Since 1973, this trade fair has featured a unique combination of photonics components, systems and applications from across the industry. We will showcase our newest range of products and solutions. We would also like to let you know about two other upcoming events we organise. Quantum Industry Day in Switzerland is returning for its third year in October. Registration is now open, so be sure to book your place. Our annual Winter School ... READ MORE
    Source: IDQPublished on 2019-05-20By cremarc
  • Divisibility of qubit channels and dynamical maps
    Quantum 3, 144 (2019).https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2019-05-20-144The concept of divisibility of dynamical maps is used to introduce an analogous concept for quantum channels by analyzing the $textit{simulability}$ of channels by means of dynamical maps. In particular, this is addressed for Lindblad divisible, completely positive divisible and positive divisible dynamical maps. The corresponding L-divisible, CP-divisible and P-divisible subsets of channels are characterized (exploiting the results by Wolf et al. [25] and visualized for the case of qubit channels. We discuss the general inclusions among divisibility sets and show several equivalences for qubit channels. To this end we study the conditions of L-divisibility for finite dimensional channels, especially the cases with negative eigenvalues, extending and completing the results of Ref. [26]. Furthermore we show that ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-05-20By David Davalos, Mario Ziman, and Carlos Pineda
  • Fault-tolerant magic state preparation with flag qubits
    Quantum 3, 143 (2019).https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2019-05-20-143Magic state distillation is one of the leading candidates for implementing universal fault-tolerant logical gates. However, the distillation circuits themselves are not fault-tolerant, so there is additional cost to first implement encoded Clifford gates with negligible error. In this paper we present a scheme to fault-tolerantly and directly prepare magic states using flag qubits. One of these schemes requires only three ancilla qubits, even with noisy Clifford gates. We compare the physical qubit and gate cost of our scheme to the magic state distillation protocol of Meier, Eastin, and Knill (MEK), which is efficient and uses a small stabilizer circuit. For low enough noise rates, we show that in some regimes the overhead can be improved by ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-05-20By Christopher Chamberland and Andrew W. Cross
  • Scientists develop polariton nano-laser operating at room temperature
    Researchers demonstrate a room temperature polariton nano-laser, providing the crucial path of related research such as polariton physics at the nanoscale and also applications in quantum information systems. ... READ MORE
    Source: NanowerkPublished on 2019-05-20
  • Subsystem symmetries, quantum cellular automata, and computational phases of quantum matter
    Quantum 3, 142 (2019).https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2019-05-20-142Quantum phases of matter are resources for notions of quantum computation. In this work, we establish a new link between concepts of quantum information theory and condensed matter physics by presenting a unified understanding of symmetry-protected topological (SPT) order protected by subsystem symmetries and its relation to measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC). The key unifying ingredient is the concept of quantum cellular automata (QCA) which we use to define subsystem symmetries acting on rigid lower-dimensional lines or fractals on a 2D lattice. Notably, both types of symmetries are treated equivalently in our framework. We show that states within a non-trivial SPT phase protected by these symmetries are indicated by the presence of the same QCA in a tensor ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-05-20By David T. Stephen, Hendrik Poulsen Nautrup, Juani Bermejo-Vega, Jens Eisert, and Robert Raussendorf
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