Quantum Computing News and Reports off the Wire. 
You’ll find the latest news from our most reliable sources, here.  The news, uncategorized, awaiting our review.   Get it first.   Because Quantum is Coming.  Qubit.

  • DOAJ Seal certifies Quantum’s high publishing standards
    Quantum has been awarded the DOAJ Seal. The seal is a distinction for journals that achieve a particularly high level of compliance to best practices and publishing standards. We are thankful for this recognition by the Directory of Open Access Journals, which further establishes Quantum as a high quality publishing venue for quantum science and related fields. ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-06-15By Quantum Journal
  • Phone addiction, cash for quantum, EV noise and more: Best of the week’s news
    Hilary Lamb, technology reporter Studies into smartphone addiction found to be flawed In one of the least surprising results of a study ever, Lancaster University researchers have found that much research on smartphone addiction is based on flawed evidence. Most academic studies into smartphone use rely on self-reported measures of device use. This study compared self-reported data on device use with data collected from the Apple Screen Time function. While just 52 out of 238 iPhone users in the study would fit into a ‘high use’ category based on self-reported data, 92 could be placed in this category based on Apple Screen Time data. This is a more serious issue than it sounds. Governments around the world are grappling in ... READ MORE
    Source: Engineering & TechnologyPublished on 2019-06-14By E&T editorial staff
  • Oscillating quasiparticles: the cycle of decay and rebirth
    Decay is relentless in the macroscopic world: Broken objects do not fit themselves back together again. However, other laws are valid in the quantum world: New research shows that so-called quasiparticles can decay and reorganize themselves again and are thus become virtually immortal. These are good prospects for the development of durable data memories. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-06-14
  • Immortal quantum particles
    Decay is relentless in the macroscopic world: broken objects do not fit themselves back together again. However, other laws are valid in the quantum world: new research shows that so-called quasiparticles can decay and reorganize themselves again and are thus become virtually immortal. These are good prospects for the development of durable data memories. ... READ MORE
    Source: Science DailyPublished on 2019-06-14
  • Oscillating Quasiparticles: the cycle of decay and rebirth
    Decay is relentless in the macroscopic world: broken objects do not fit themselves back together again. However, other laws are valid in the quantum world: new research shows that so-called quasiparticles can decay and reorganize themselves again and are thus become virtually immortal. These are good prospects for the development of durable data memories.read more ... READ MORE
    Source: PressReleasePointPublished on 2019-06-14By Technical University of Munich
  • Armen Sarkissian: ‘The moment you stop learning, you die’
    The Armenian president and physicist on Byron, Kim Kardashian — and the new ‘quantum politics’ ... READ MORE
    Source: Financial TimesPublished on 2019-06-14
  • Eavesdropper’s ability to attack a free-space quantum-key-distribution receiver in atmospheric turbulence
    Author(s): Poompong Chaiwongkhot, Katanya B. Kuntz, Yanbao Zhang, Anqi Huang, Jean-Philippe Bourgoin, Shihan Sajeed, Norbert Lütkenhaus, Thomas Jennewein, and Vadim MakarovThe ability of an eavesdropper (Eve) to perform an intercept-resend attack on a free-space quantum-key-distribution (QKD) receiver by precisely controlling the incidence angle of an attack laser has been previously demonstrated. However, such an attack could be ineffective in the presence of atmosph...[Phys. Rev. A 99, 062315] Published Fri Jun 14, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-06-14By Poompong Chaiwongkhot, Katanya B. Kuntz, Yanbao Zhang, Anqi Huang, Jean-Philippe Bourgoin, Shihan Sajeed, Norbert Lütkenhaus, Thomas Jennewein, and Vadim Makarov
  • Asymmetric sending or not sending twin-field quantum key distribution in practice
    Author(s): Xing-Yu Zhou, Chun-Hui Zhang, Chun-Mei Zhang, and Qin WangQuantum key distribution (QKD) offers a secret way to share keys between legitimate users which is guaranteed by the law of quantum mechanics. Most recently, the limitation of transmission distance without quantum repeaters was broken through by twin-field QKD [M. Lucamarini et al., Nature (London)...[Phys. Rev. A 99, 062316] Published Fri Jun 14, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-06-14By Xing-Yu Zhou, Chun-Hui Zhang, Chun-Mei Zhang, and Qin Wang
  • Quantum computing is important for Africa
    Dr Solomon Assefa, IBM Research Africa (left) and Professor Zeblon Vilakazi, Wits deputy vice-chancellor for research and postgraduate affairs. Launching a partnership with the University of the Witwatersrand, Dr Solomon Assefa at IBM Research Africa said that classical computing has served society incredibly well but many of the world’s biggest mysteries and greatest opportunities remain beyond the grasp of today’s classical machines.  “To continue the pace of progress we need to augment the classical approach with a completely new paradigm, one that follows its own set of rules. It is called quantum computing. For Africa to remain competitive we must get ... READ MORE
    Source: EE EngineerITPublished on 2019-06-14By Aimee Clarke
  • Accenture: Aerospace, Defense Leaders See AI as Tech Game Changer
    A new Accenture (NYSE: ACN) report shows that 33 percent of aerospace and defense executives said they expect their organizations to witness the greatest impact from artificial intelligence in the next three years compared with distributed ledger, quantum computing and other emerging technologies. ... READ MORE
    Source: GOVCONWirePublished on 2019-06-13By Jane Edwards
  • Strain switches 2D phase-change transistor
    A new way to switch transistors could overcome the power consumption and undesirable current leakage problems encountered in conventional nanoscale field-effect devices. The new technique, which works by applying a voltage-induced strain to a 2D material so that it goes from being a semimetal to a semiconductor, could be used to control devices for ultrafast low-power non-volatile logic and memory. Almost all transistors today rely on the electric-field effect to tune the conductivity of a semiconducting channel from its conducting “on” state to a non-conducing “off” state. As transistors become ever smaller, however, effects such as current leakage become more problematic. Researchers at the University of Rochester in the US led by Stephen M. Wu have now put forward an ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-06-13By Belle Dumé
  • Knuth and Gödel Prizes to be Awarded at 2019 ACM SIGACT Conference
    NEW YORK, June 13, 2019 — SIGACT, the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Algorithms and Computation Theory, has announced that the Donald E. Knuth Prize will be awarded to Avi Wigderson and the Gödel Prize will be awarded to Irit Dinur. Wigderson and Dinur will be formally recognized at the 51st Annual Symposium on the Theory of Computing (STOC 2019) in Phoenix, Arizona, June 23-26.   Donald E. Knuth Prize Avi Wigderson of the Institute for Advanced Study is recognized with the 2019 Donald E. Knuth Prize for fundamental and lasting contributions to the foundations of computer science in areas including randomized computation, cryptography, circuit complexity, proof complexity, parallel computation, and our understanding of fundamental graph properties. ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-06-13By Mariana Iriarte
  • Hybrid Nanostructure Steps Up Light-Harvesting Efficiency
    Mingxing Li (sitting) and Mircea Cotlet (left) of Brookhaven Lab’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials and Jia-Shiang Chen of Stony Brook University’s Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Department used a self-assembly technique based on the interactions between electrically charged particles (opposite charges attract; like charges repel) to create a “nanohybrid” structure that contains both biologically derived and nonliving materials. Compared to the nonhybrid counterparts, the nanohybrid shows increased energy transfer efficiency and photoresponsivity, or response to light—ideal characteristics for solar cell applications.To absorb incoming sunlight, plants and certain kinds of bacteria rely on a light-harvesting protein complex containing molecules called chromophores. This complex funnels solar energy to the photosynthetic reaction center, where it is converted into chemical energy for metabolic ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-13By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • DOE Maps Out Quantum Research Centers
    The U.S. Department of Energy will build at least two new research centers to support quantum information science . ... READ MORE
    Source: ACM Computers & SocietyPublished on 2019-06-13
  • Scientists Achieve First Observation of Three-dimensional Quantum Hall Effect
    A research team led by Prof. QIAO Zhenhua from University of Science and Technology of China of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Assoc. Prof. ZHANG Liyuan from Southern University of Science and Technology has for the first time experimentally observed the three-dimensional (3D) quantum Hall effect in bulk ZrTe5 crystal. This study was published in Nature. Normally, electrons travel in straight line-it means that the current usually flows following the direction of voltage drop. When a magnetic field is applied in a direction perpendicular to the current, a transverse force will be exerted on the charge carriers, leading to the production of a transverse potential difference. This phenomenon is the famous Hall effect. In 1980 a quantum-mechanical version of the Hall effect was discovered by German physicist ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-13By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Diamond Metalens Could Improve Quantum Device Performance and Scalability
    At the chemical level, diamonds are no more than carbon atoms aligned in a 3D crystal lattice. Even a diamond that looks flawless contains defects that can absorb or emit light. Small defects in diamonds called nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers hold electron spins that can be manipulated at room temperature. Each NV center emits light that can provide information about the spin’s quantum state. Collecting light from deeply embedded NV centers usually requires a bulky optical microscope in a highly controlled laboratory environment. Now, a research group at the University of Pennsylvania has designed a specialized metalens that circumvents the need for a large, expensive microscope. By finding a certain kind of defect inside a ... READ MORE
    Source: PhotonicsPublished on 2019-06-13
  • Quantum – a Double-Edged Sword for Cryptography
    Defence, finance, social networking – communications everywhere rely on cryptographic security. Cryptography involves jumbling up messages according to a code, or key, that has too many combinations for even very powerful computers to try out.But quantum computers have an advantage. Unlike regular computers, which process information in ‘bits’ of definite ones and zeros, quantum computers process information in ‘qubits’, the states of which remain uncertain until the final calculation.The result is that a quantum computer can effectively try out many different keys in parallel. Cryptography that would be impenetrable to regular computers could take a quantum computer mere seconds to crack.Practical quantum computers that can be used to break encryption are expected to be years, if not decades, away. But that should not ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-13By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Discovery of Field-Induced Pair Density Wave State in Cuprate High Temperature Superconductors
    Superconductors are quantum materials that are perfect transmitters of electricity and electronic information. Although they form the technological basis of solid-state quantum computing, they are also its key limiting factor because conventional superconductors only work at temperatures near -270 oC. This has motivated a worldwide race to try to discover higher temperature superconductors. Materials containing CuO2 crystal layers (cuprates) are, at present, the best candidate for highest temperature superconductivity, operating at approximately -120 oC. But room temperature superconductivity in these compounds appears to be frustrated by the existence of a competing electronic phase, and focus has recently been on identifying and controlling that mysterious second phase.Superconductivity occurs when electrons form pairs of opposite spin and opposite momentum, and these “Cooper pairs” condense into ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-13By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Penn Engineers Design Nanostructured Diamond Metalens For Compact Quantum Technologies
    At the chemical level, diamonds are no more than carbon atoms aligned in a precise, three-dimensional (3D) crystal lattice. However, even a seemingly flawless diamond contains defects: spots in that lattice where a carbon atom is missing or has been replaced by something else. Some of these defects are highly desirable; they trap individual electrons that can absorb or emit light, causing the various colors found in diamond gemstones and, more importantly, creating a platform for diverse quantum technologies for advanced computing, secure communication and precision sensing.Quantum technologies are based on units of quantum information known as “qubits.” The spin of electrons are prime candidates to serve as qubits; unlike binary computing systems where data takes the form of only ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-13By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Using light for good
    What was your career like before you started M Squared? I watched the first space shuttle launch when I was at school, and I remember sitting there thinking, “Geez, I don’t know what I want to do in life, but I want to do something like that.” I went on to study laser physics and optoelectronics as an undergraduate at the University of Strathclyde, UK, and my main motivation for choosing that course was that it looked like the industry of the future. It turned out that this was at least partly true, in lots of exciting ways that people might not have imagined back in the late 1980s. I stayed at Strathclyde to do a PhD in solid-state lasers, ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-06-13By No Author
  • Mysterious Majorana quasiparticle is now closer to being controlled for quantum computing
    (Princeton University) Using a new approach, Princeton University researchers detected the elusive Majorana quasiparticle, notable for being its own antiparticle and for its potential as the basis for a robust quantum computing system, in a device built from a superconductor, small magnetic elements, and a topological insulator. ... READ MORE
    Source: EurekAlert! Chemistry & PhysicsPublished on 2019-06-13
  • Wits enters the quantum computing universe with IBM Q
    (University of the Witwatersrand) IBM (NYSE: IBM) has announced the expansion of its quantum computing efforts to Africa in a new collaboration with the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits University) in South Africa. Wits University is the first African partner on the IBM Q Network and will be the gateway for academics across South Africa and to the 15 universities who are part of the African Research Universities Alliance (ARUA). ... READ MORE
    Source: EurekAlert! Technology & EngineeringPublished on 2019-06-13
  • New quantum dot microscope shows electric potentials of individual atoms
    (Forschungszentrum Juelich) Researchers from Jülich in cooperation with partners from other institutions has developed a new method to measure the electric potentials of a sample at atomic accuracy. Using conventional methods, it was virtually impossible until now to quantitatively record the electric potentials that occur in the immediate vicinity of individual molecules or atoms. The new scanning quantum dot microscopy method could open up new opportunities for chip manufacture or the characterization of biomolecules such as DNA. ... READ MORE
    Source: EurekAlert! Chemistry & PhysicsPublished on 2019-06-13
  • Generalized Adiabatic Theorem and Strong-Coupling Limits
    Quantum 3, 152 (2019).https://doi.org/10.22331/q-2019-06-12-152We generalize Kato's adiabatic theorem to nonunitary dynamics with an isospectral generator. This enables us to unify two strong-coupling limits: one driven by fast oscillations under a Hamiltonian, and the other driven by strong damping under a Lindbladian. We discuss the case where both mechanisms are present and provide nonperturbative error bounds. We also analyze the links with the quantum Zeno effect and dynamics.Generalized Adiabatic Theorem and Strong-Coupling LimitsDaniel Burgarth1, Paolo Facchi2,3, Hiromichi Nakazato4, Saverio Pascazio2,3,5, and Kazuya Yuasa41Center for Engineered Quantum Systems, Dept. of Physics & Astronomy, Macquarie University, 2109 NSW, Australia2Dipartimento di Fisica and MECENAS, Università di Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy3INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari, Italy4Department of Physics, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555, Japan5Istituto Nazionale ... READ MORE
    Source: Quantum JournalPublished on 2019-06-12By Daniel Burgarth, Paolo Facchi, Hiromichi Nakazato, Saverio Pascazio, and Kazuya Yuasa
  • Tune in to Future Polarity Quantum Devices
    A thorough study published on NanoLetters and led by the ICN2 Advanced Electron Nanoscopy group provides new insights on the growth mechanisms and conditions that determine the polarity of semiconductor nanostructures. Fine control of polarity can result in the design of new quantum devices.Future applications of nanomaterials depend on our ability to understand their characteristics at the atomic scale and to modulate them at will. Polarity appears to play an important role in determining the physical and morphological properties of semiconductor nanostructures, thus researchers are studying how to control or change it.Because of the way atoms are arranged in crystal structures, electromagnetic charges are locally separated. As a consequence, if we look at the crystal along specific directions, we can ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-12By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • A Bubbly New Way to Detect the Magnetic Fields of Nanometer-Scale Particles
    As if they were bubbles expanding in a just-opened bottle of champagne, tiny circular regions of magnetism can be rapidly enlarged to provide a precise method of measuring the magnetic properties of nanoparticles.The technique, uncorked by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their collaborators, provides a deeper understanding of the magnetic behavior of nanoparticles. Because the method is fast, economical and does not require special conditions — measurements can occur at room temperature and under atmospheric pressure, or even in liquids — it provides manufacturers with a practical way to measure and improve their control of the properties of magnetic nanoparticles for a host of medical and environmental applications.  A tiny magnetic rod is placed ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-12By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • What’s New in HPC Research: Brain Mapping, Earthquakes, Energy Efficiency & More
    In this bimonthly feature, HPCwire highlights newly published research in the high-performance computing community and related domains. From parallel programming to exascale to quantum computing, the details are here. Overcoming limitations of GPGPU computing in scientific applications While GPU performance has improved steadily, the PCIe interconnect that connects the system host memory and the GPUs has not kept pace. In this article, written by a team from the Center for Scientific Communication and Visualization Research at University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, the authors explore two alternatives to limited PCIe bandwidth – Nvidia NVLink interconnects and zero-copy algorithms for shared memory heterogeneous system architecture (HSA) devices. Using benchmarks, they measure the performance of each device in various scientific applications. Authors: Connor ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-06-12By Oliver Peckham
  • Discovery of field-induced pair density wave state in high temperature superconductors
    Superconductors are quantum materials that are perfect transmitters of electricity and electronic information. Although they form the technological basis of solid-state quantum computing, they are also its key limiting factor because conventional superconductors only work at temperatures near -270 °C. This has motivated a worldwide race to try to discover higher temperature superconductors. Materials containing CuO2 crystal layers (cuprates) are, at present, the best candidate for highest temperature superconductivity, operating at approximately -120 °C. But room temperature superconductivity in these compounds appears to be frustrated by the existence of a competing electronic phase, and focus has recently been on identifying and controlling that mysterious second phase. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-06-12
  • Physics at the Edge
    Andrea YoungPhoto Credit:SONIA FERNANDEZ In 2005, condensed matter physicists Charles Kane and Eugene Mele considered the fate of graphene at low temperatures. Their work led to the discovery of a new state of matter dubbed a “topological insulator,” which would usher in a new era of materials science.  “A topological insulator is a material that is an insulator in its interior but is highly conducting on its surface,” said UC Santa Barbara assistant physics professor Andrea Young. In two-dimensions, an ideal topological insulator would have “ballistic” conductance at its edges, Young explained, meaning that electrons traveling through the region would encounter zero resistance. Joshua IslandPhoto Credit: SONIA FERNANDEZ Ironically, while Kane and Mele’s work would lead to the discovery of topological insulating ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-12By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • IBM Expands its Quantum Computing Program to Africa with Wits University
    JOHANNESBURG, June 12, 2019 — IBM  today announced the expansion of its quantum computing efforts to Africa in a new collaboration with the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits University) in South Africa. Wits University is the first African academic partner in the IBM Q Network and will be the gateway for academic collaboration across South Africa, and to the other 15 universities who are part of the African Research Universities Alliance (ARUA). “This is the latest outcome of the joint partnership between IBM Research and Wits, which started in 2016 when IBM opened its second lab in Africa in Wits University’s Tshimologong Digital Innovation Precinct in Johannesburg. To expand the IBM Q Network to include Wits will drive innovation in ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-06-12By Mariana Iriarte
  • A Leap into the Continuum
    Computing the dynamics of many interacting quantum particles accurately is a daunting task. There is however a promising calculation method for such systems: tensor networks, which are being researched in the theory division at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics. The initial focus of tensor network was on quantum particles restricted to a lattice, just as they occur in crystals for example, or in the quantum registers of future quantum computers. In a new paper, the postdoctoral researcher Antoine Tilloy and the theory division director Ignacio Cirac managed to extend this approach to the continuum. A goal in the long run is an elegant calculation method for the quantum field theories that describes the basic forces of physics.Describing the ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-12By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Experimental Device Generates Electricity From the Coldness of the Universe
    The obvious drawback of solar panels is that they require sunlight to generate electricity. Some have observed that for a device on Earth facing space, which has a frigid temperature, the chilling outflow of energy from the device can be harvested using the same kind of optoelectronic physics we have used to harness solar energy. New work, in a recent issue of Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing, looks to provide a potential path to generating electricity like solar cells but that can power electronics at night.An international team of scientists has demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to generate a measurable amount of electricity in a diode directly from the coldness of the universe. The infrared ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-12By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Video: Readying Quantum Chromodynamics for Exascale
    In this video, Fermilab scientist Andreas Kronfeld discusses the LatticeQCD project for Quantum Chromodynamics. As part of the Exascale Computing Project, LatticeQCD is increasing the precision of QCD calculations to understand the properties of quarks and gluons in the Standard Model of particle physics, a theory that clarifies the basic building blocks (or fundamental particles) of the universe and how they are related. The post Video: Readying Quantum Chromodynamics for Exascale appeared first on insideHPC. ... READ MORE
    Source: Inside High Performance ComputingPublished on 2019-06-12By staff
  • Solve for X
    “For the average journalist,” particle physicist Bruno Mansoulié notes astutely, “equations just mean a vanishing audience.” Being one of those mathematics-adverse science writers myself, the task of reviewing Mansoulié’s book, All of Physics (Almost) in 15 Equations – which has recently been translated into English from its original French – offered the promise of a brilliant redemption narrative, for me at least. In the ultimate in immersion therapy, I imagined reluctantly allowing Mansoulié to expose me to the wonder of once-dreaded equations. My hope was that I should emerge, transformed and enlightened by the book. Unfortunately, that wasn’t the case, and Mansoulié has not quite cracked the formula for success. The premise of this short volume is certainly sound. Each ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-06-12By No Author
  • New Paper: Practical Annealing-Based Quantum Computing
    Researchers at D-Wave Systems have published a new paper on Practical Annealing-Based Quantum Computing. "According to the paper, quantum annealing is the viable way forward to connect quantum hardware to real-world applications. Providing annealing-based QPUs as part of a complete computing platform within a declarative paradigm has made this nascent technology accessible for many users who, in turn, are helping to drive this approach forward." The post New Paper: Practical Annealing-Based Quantum Computing appeared first on insideHPC. ... READ MORE
    Source: Inside High Performance ComputingPublished on 2019-06-12By staff
  • ‘God Does Not Play Dice with the Universe,’ Einstein Writes in Letter About His Qualms with Quantum Theory
    Three letters written by Einstein are up for auction, and they offer an intriguing view of his thoughts on quantum physics. ... READ MORE
    Source: Live SciencePublished on 2019-06-12
  • Measure of quantum correlations that lies approximately between entanglement and discord
    Author(s): Aaron SzaszWhen a quantum system is divided into two local subsystems, measurements on the two subsystems can exhibit correlations beyond those possible in a classical joint probability distribution; these are partially explained by entanglement, and more generally by a wider class of measures such as the quan...[Phys. Rev. A 99, 062313] Published Wed Jun 12, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-06-12By Aaron Szasz
  • Scientists achieve first observation of three-dimensional quantum Hall effect
    In this study, researchers discovered that the carrier density wave induced by electron-electron interaction is the key factor for the appearance of 3D quantum Hall effect. Electrons in such a system can travel freely between different energy bands, like boats traveling in vast ocean. ... READ MORE
    Source: NanowerkPublished on 2019-06-12
  • Becoming Quantum Ready in Africa
    Classical computing has served society incredibly well. It gave us the Internet and cashless commerce. It sent humans to the moon, put robots on Mars and smartphones in our pockets. But many of the world’s biggest mysteries and potentially greatest opportunities remain beyond the grasp of classical computers forever. To continue the pace of progress, we need to augment the classical approach with a completely new paradigm, one that follows its own set of rules. It’s called quantum computing. Herman Mashaba, Mayor of Johannesburg and the chief executive of the City Council, holds an IBM Q chip at the IBM Research lab in South Africa. Quantum Computing is a radically new way of performing computer calculations. For certain problems, it ... READ MORE
    Source: IBM ResearchPublished on 2019-06-12By Ismail Akhalwaya
  • Yale science hits the stage with ‘Quantum Sound’
    Kyle Serniak, Spencer Topel, and Luke Burkhart of the Yale Quantum Institute are planning a singularly unique performance merging art and science. ... READ MORE
    Source: Yale Science & Technology NewsPublished on 2019-06-11
  • Fiber-Optic Probe Can See Molecular Bonds
    In “Avengers: Endgame,” Tony Stark warned Scott Lang that sending him into the quantum realm and bringing him back would be a “billion-to-one cosmic fluke.” In reality, shrinking a light beam to a nanometer-sized point to spy on quantum-scale light-matter interactions and retrieving the information is not any easier. Now, engineers at the University of California, Riverside, have developed a new technology to tunnel light into the quantum realm at an unprecedented efficiency.In a Nature Photonics paper, a team led by Ruoxue Yan, an assistant professor of chemical and environmental engineering, and Ming Liu, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, describe the world’s first portable, inexpensive, optical nanoscopy tool that integrates a glass optical fiber with a silver nanowire condenser. The device ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-11By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Researchers ‘Stretch’ the Ability of 2D Materials to Change Technology
    Two-dimensional (2D) materials—as thin as a single layer of atoms—have intrigued scientists with their flexibility, elasticity, and unique electronic properties since first being discovered in materials such as graphene in 2004. Some of these materials can be especially susceptible to changes in their material properties as they are stretched and pulled. Under applied strain, they have been predicted to undergo phase transitions as disparate as superconducting in one moment to nonconducting the next, or optically opaque in one moment to transparent in the next.Now, University of Rochester researchers have combined 2D materials with oxide materials in a new way, using a transistor-scale device platform, to fully explore the capabilities of these changeable 2D materials to transform electronics, optics, computing, and ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-11By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Engineers design nanostructured diamond metalens for compact quantum technologies
    By finding a certain kind of defect inside a block of diamond and fashioning a pattern of nanoscale pillars on the surface above it, engineering researchers can now control the shape of individual photons emitted by the defect. Because those photons carry information about the spin state of an electron, such a system could be used as the basis for compact quantum technologies.  ... READ MORE
    Source: Science DailyPublished on 2019-06-11
  • A Novel Theory of Heat, in the Search for Efficient Thermoelectrics
    EPFL and MARVEL researchers have developed a new theory for heat conduction that can finally describe and predict the thermal conductivity of any insulating material. This new formulation will let scientists make accurate predictions of thermal conductivity in a range of materials for critical engineering applications – from electronics to lasers to waste-heat recovery.Thermoelectric materials in particular hold vast potential for use in energy applications because they generate electricity from waste heat, such as that generated by industrial processes, by car and truck engines, or simply by the sun. Reducing the thermal conductivity of these materials by a factor of three, for example, would completely revolutionize existing waste-heat recovery, and also all refrigeration and air-cooling technology.A unique theory for all insulating materialsIn ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-11By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Direct Observation of Giant Molecules
    The tiny size of conventional diatomic molecules in the sub-nanometer regime hinders direct optical resolution of their constituents. Physicists from the Quantum Many Body Division at MPQ led by Prof. Immanuel Bloch were able to bind pairs of highly excited atoms at a distance of one micrometer. The huge bond length — comparable to small biological cells like the E. coli bacteria — allows a microscopic study of the underlying binding structure by directly optically resolving both bound atoms.The small size and the interaction of all contributing electrons make it very complicated to experimentally and theoretically study molecular bonds in a highly detailed manner. Even the mere structure of atoms, the fundamental building blocks of chemical bonds, cannot be calculated analytically. Only ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-11By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Light-Powered Nano-Microbial ‘Factories’ Could Help Reduce Carbon
    Using light-activated quantum dots to activate specific enzymes within microbial cells, researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder (CU Boulder) created nanobio-hybrid organisms (nanorgs) that can consume harmful gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and convert them into biodegradable plastic, gasoline, ammonia, and biodiesel. According to the researchers, the technique could improve CO2 capture and one day potentially replace carbon-intensive manufacturing for plastics and fuels. A research team led by professor Prashant Nagpal began exploring the potential of quantum dots to offset carbon production in 2013. The goal was to see if quantum dots could act as a sort of “spark plug,” triggering enzymes within microbial ... READ MORE
    Source: PhotonicsPublished on 2019-06-11
  • Intriguing Behaviour of Molybdenum Diselenide at Room Temperature
    A study recently published on Nano Letters has revealed interesting properties of monolayer molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), which can open up to spintronic applications of this nanomaterial. A sample with a low concentration of dopants and many crystal defects has shown spin lifetimes of 100ns at room temperature and spin polarization reversal over 60K. Dr Zeila Zanolli, Ramon y Cajal researcher at the ICN2 Theory and Simulation Group, has played a fundamental role in the theoretical interpretation of these results.Monolayers of certain materials, named transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), are bidimensional semiconductors presenting direct band gap and strong spin orbit splitting, both characteristics that make them particularly useful for spintronic applications. In order to exploit the technological potential of these materials, though, ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-11By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Women will find it harder to adapt to tech disruption, McKinsey report suggests
    While many workers fear automation and disruptive technological change in the future of workplaces, little research has been done on whether men and women will encounter the same challenges and at the same rate.   According to a new report by the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) – launched alongside London Tech Week - women may find it harder to adapt to technological change than the opposite sex. The same opportunities as those offered to men would not be guaranteed. On accessing adequate mobility, skills and tech-readiness in the age of automation, women could face "pervasive barriers on all three of them", the report states. This would make navigating the transition in the future of work for women much more difficult, also increasing gender ... READ MORE
    Source: Engineering & TechnologyPublished on 2019-06-11By Ben Heubl
  • Hypersonic matterwaves for ultrafast atomtronics
    Atomtronics manipulates atoms much in the way that electronics manipulates electrons. It carries the promise of highly compact quantum devices which can measure incredibly small forces or tiny rotations. Such devices might one day be used to monitor Earth's status by sensing water levels in the desert or in the search for minerals and oil. They will also be used in navigation, when GPS fails on planes or ships due to malicious attacks or simply because it is not available, e.g. in the deep seas. They might also one day act as portable quantum simulators solving complex computational tasks. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-06-11
  • Quantum—a double-edged sword for cryptography
    Quantum computers pose a big threat to the security of modern communications, deciphering cryptographic codes that would take regular computers forever to crack. But drawing on the properties of quantum behaviour could also provide a route to truly secure cryptography. ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-06-11
  • Bounds on the entanglement of two-qutrit systems from fixed marginals
    Author(s): Giuseppe Baio, Dariusz Chruściński, Paweł Horodecki, Antonino Messina, and Gniewomir SarbickiWe discuss the problem of characterizing upper bounds on entanglement in a bipartite quantum system when only the reduced density matrices (marginals) are known. In particular, starting from the known two-qubit case, we propose a family of candidates for maximally entangled mixed states with respect...[Phys. Rev. A 99, 062312] Published Tue Jun 11, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-06-11By Giuseppe Baio, Dariusz Chruściński, Paweł Horodecki, Antonino Messina, and Gniewomir Sarbicki
  • Quantum secret sharing with polarization-entangled photon pairs
    Author(s): Brian P. Williams, Joseph M. Lukens, Nicholas A. Peters, Bing Qi, and Warren P. GriceWe describe and experimentally demonstrate a more practical three-party quantum secret sharing (QSS) protocol using polarization-entangled photon pairs. The source itself serves as an active participant and can switch between the required photon states by modulating the pump beam only, thereby makin...[Phys. Rev. A 99, 062311] Published Tue Jun 11, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-06-11By Brian P. Williams, Joseph M. Lukens, Nicholas A. Peters, Bing Qi, and Warren P. Grice
  • Penn engineers design nanostructured diamond metalens for compact quantum technologies
    (University of Pennsylvania) By finding a certain kind of defect inside a block of diamond and fashioning a pattern of nanoscale pillars on the surface above it, Penn Engineering researchers can now control the shape of individual photons emitted by the defect. Because those photons carry information about the spin state of an electron, such a system could be used as the basis for compact quantum technologies.  ... READ MORE
    Source: EurekAlert! NanotechnologyPublished on 2019-06-11
  • 2D Material Combines Long Lifetime with Freedom of Movement
    Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) have developed a method to isolate thin layers of tungsten diselenide (WSe2) — a 2D material — from crystals, to allow layers of WSe2 to be stacked on top of other atomically thin materials such as boron nitride and graphene. The discovery could further the use of WSe2 for building smaller, more efficient computing devices. When the WSe2 layer is sandwiched between two boron nitride flakes and interacts with light, an exciton is formed. The exciton in the WSe2 contains a property known as “valley spin”— an expanded degree of freedom of movement that could be useful in the building of quantum computing devices. However, excitons usually do not have a ... READ MORE
    Source: PhotonicsPublished on 2019-06-10
  • Preliminary Agenda Posted for HPC User Forum, Sept. 9-11 at Argonne National Laboratory
    June 10, 2019 — On behalf of Hyperion Research and the volunteer steering committee of HPC users that directs the HPC User Forum, we invite you to join us to discuss the current status and future of HPC at the future home of Aurora, America’s first planned exascale supercomputer due for installation in 2021. We’ll explore exascale initiatives around the world, hardware and software innovations to support a future based on what DOE calls “extreme heterogeneity,” the convergence of simulation and analytics, the HPC and enterprise markets, on premise and cloud computing, and emerging methods including AI-ML-DL and quantum computing.
    Confirmed Speakers So Far: Leonardo ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-06-10By Tiffany Trader
  • RFI: Help U.S. Catalyze Quantum Information Science
    Quantum information science is likely to have applications in many domains stretching from sensor technology and communications to quantum computing. Building an U.S. ecosystem to foster QIS was first articulated in a National Strategic Overview for Quantum Information Science issued by the National Science and Technology Council and later folded into NSF $1.2B plus National Quantum Initiative Act enacted early this year. Recently, the NSF re-opened its Request for Information (RFI) regarding how best to implement elements of the strategic overview which spelled out several key policy areas bulleted here: Focus on a science-first approach that aims to identify and solve Grand Challenges: problems whose solutions enable transformative scientific and industrial progress; Build a quantum-smart and diverse workforce to meet the needs of a ... READ MORE
    Source: HPC WirePublished on 2019-06-10By John Russell
  • NIST Infrared Frequency Comb Measures Biological Signatures
    Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and collaborators have demonstrated a compact frequency-comb apparatus that rapidly measures the entire infrared band of light to detect biological, chemical and physical properties of matter. Infrared light travels in waves longer than visible light and is most familiar as the radiation associated with heat.The NIST setup, which occupies just a few square feet of table space, has potential applications such as disease diagnosis, identification of chemicals used in manufacturing, and biomass energy harvesting. The work is described in Science Advances.Optical frequency combs measure exact frequencies, or colors, of light. Various comb designs have enabled the development of next-generation atomic clocks and show promise for environmental applications such as detecting methane leaks. Biological ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-10By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • UCI Scientists Create New Class of Two-Dimensional Materials
    In a paper published this week in Nature, materials science researchers at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions unveil a new process for producing oxide perovskite crystals in exquisitely flexible, free-standing layers.A two-dimensional rendition of this substance is intriguing to scientists and engineers, because 2D materials have been shown to possess remarkable electronic properties, including high-temperature superconductivity. Such compounds are prized as potential building blocks in multifunctional high-tech devices for energy and quantum computing, among other applications.“Through our successful fabrication of ultrathin perovskite oxides down to the monolayer limit, we’ve created a new class of two-dimensional materials,” said co-author Xiaoqing Pan, professor of materials science & engineering and Henry Samueli Endowed Chair in Engineering at UCI. “Since these crystals ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-10By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • Probing Semiconductor Crystals with a Sphere of Light
    Tohoku University researchers have developed a technique using a hollow sphere to measure the electronic and optical properties of large semiconducting crystals. The approach, published in the journal Applied Physics Express, improves on current photoluminescence spectroscopy techniques and could lead to energy savings for mass producers, and thus consumers, of power devices.Semiconducting crystals are used to make electronic devices like microprocessor chips and transistors. Manufacturers need to be able to detect crystal defects and test their energy conversion efficiency. One way to do this is to measure their ‘internal quantum efficiency’, or their ability to generate photons from electrons excited by an electric current or an excitation laser. Currently available methods limit the sample size that can be tested at ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-10By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
  • The Day Computers Can Break All Encryption Is Coming
    With quantum computing advancements threatening to expose all encrypted data, technology companies and security agencies are pursuing projects to preserve information safety. ... READ MORE
    Source: ACM Computers & SocietyPublished on 2019-06-10
  • Fiber-optic probe can see molecular bonds
    In "Avengers: Endgame," Tony Stark warned Scott Lang that sending him into the quantum realm and bringing him back would be a "billion-to-one cosmic fluke." ... READ MORE
    Source: Phys.org PhysicsPublished on 2019-06-10
  • Growing 2D Crystals Over 3D Surfaces Could Be a Way to Engineer Quantum Emission
    A team led by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) explored how 2D crystals grow over 3D objects and how the curvature of 3D objects can stretch and strain the 2D crystals. The team’s findings could lead to a strategy for engineering strain during the growth of crystals to fabricate single-photon emitters for quantum information processing. When atomically thin 2D crystals were grown on substrates patterned with sharp steps and trenches, the crystals grew up and down these flat obstacles without changing their properties or growth rates. However, when the 2D crystals were grown on curvy surfaces, the crystals were forced to stretch as they grew in order to maintain their crystal structure. The researchers found that they could ... READ MORE
    Source: PhotonicsPublished on 2019-06-10
  • UK government to invest £153m in quantum computing
    Opening the annual celebration of London’s technology sector, May said: “Already, we are one of the best places in the world to start and grow a tech business. “British tech is growing over one-and-a-half times faster than the rest of the economy, adding more than £130bn to our economy every year,” she said. “But if we are going to maintain our position as a global leader, our challenge is how we develop British tech and make it even better. We want this to be the place everyone thinks of – and comes to – first when they want to develop their world-changing tech ideas. This is a challenge shared between industry and government. “Today, as we sit on the cusp ... READ MORE
    Source: Engineering & TechnologyPublished on 2019-06-10By E&T editorial staff
  • Measuring fermionic entanglement: Entropy, negativity, and spin structure
    Author(s): Eyal Cornfeld, Eran Sela, and Moshe GoldsteinThe recent direct experimental measurement of quantum entanglement paves the way towards a better understanding of many-body quantum systems and their correlations. Nevertheless, the experimental and theoretical advances had so far been predominantly limited to bosonic systems. Here, we study fermio...[Phys. Rev. A 99, 062309] Published Mon Jun 10, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-06-10By Eyal Cornfeld, Eran Sela, and Moshe Goldstein
  • Nested quantum annealing correction at finite temperature: $p$-spin models
    Author(s): Shunji Matsuura, Hidetoshi Nishimori, Walter Vinci, and Daniel A. LidarQuantum annealing in a real device is necessarily susceptible to errors due to diabatic transitions and thermal noise. Nested quantum annealing correction is a method to suppress errors by using an all-to-all penalty coupling among a set of physical qubits representing a logical qubit. We show analy...[Phys. Rev. A 99, 062307] Published Mon Jun 10, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-06-10By Shunji Matsuura, Hidetoshi Nishimori, Walter Vinci, and Daniel A. Lidar
  • Detecting coherence via spectrum estimation
    Author(s): Xiao-Dong Yu and Otfried GühneCoherence is a basic phenomenon in quantum mechanics and considered to be an essential resource in quantum information processing. Although the quantification of coherence has attracted a lot of interest, the lack of efficient methods to measure the coherence in experiments limits the applications. ...[Phys. Rev. A 99, 062310] Published Mon Jun 10, 2019 ... READ MORE
    Source: APS Physics ~ Quantum InformationPublished on 2019-06-10By Xiao-Dong Yu and Otfried Gühne
  • Settling the debate: Solving the electronic surface states of samarium hexaboride
    (Osaka University) Researchers at Osaka University show that samarium hexaboride is a topological insulator, which allows electrons to flow only along its exterior surface. Together with its strong electron correlations, this material has potential to be used in future spintronic quantum devices that utilize the spins of individual electrons. ... READ MORE
    Source: EurekAlert! Chemistry & PhysicsPublished on 2019-06-10
  • Physicists See a Quantum Leap, Halt It, and Reverse It
    An experiment observed quantum leaps as they happened, revealing that these speedy little jumps are in fact gradual, rather than instantaneous. ... READ MORE
    Source: WIRED Top StoriesPublished on 2019-06-09By Philip Ball
  • Perovskites a single crystal unit thick stand free
    Perovskites may be the next material to get the full 2D makeover, according to studies by a team of researchers at Nanjing University in China and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of California, Irvine, in the US. While previous work by other researchers had suggested that the crystalline lattice of free-standing perovskites would collapse in films less than five crystal lattice units thick, the researchers led by Peng Wang, Yuefeng Nie and Xiaoqing Pan have now fabricated perovskite in free-standing single unit cell layers. Regular readers of Physics World  will already be familiar with perovskites, particularly in our coverage of optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and LEDs, as efficiencies of devices using these materials have skyrocketed in recent ... READ MORE
    Source: Physics WorldPublished on 2019-06-08By Anna Demming
  • Chip Design Drastically Reduces Energy Needed to Compute with Light
    MIT researchers have developed a novel “photonic” chip that uses light instead of electricity — and consumes relatively little power in the process. The chip could be used to process massive neural networks millions of times more efficiently than today’s classical computers do.Neural networks are machine-learning models that are widely used for such tasks as robotic object identification, natural language processing, drug development, medical imaging, and powering driverless cars. Novel optical neural networks, which use optical phenomena to accelerate computation, can run much faster and more efficiently than their electrical counterparts.  But as traditional and optical neural networks grow more complex, they eat up tons of power. To tackle that issue, researchers and major tech companies — including Google, IBM, ... READ MORE
    Source: STRNPublished on 2019-06-07By Posted by Mhean Palisoc
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